oversight

FCA's Contracting Activities

Published by the Farm Credit Administration, Office of Inspector General on 2017-05-22.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

OFFICE OF
INSPECTOR GENERAL         Audit Report
                    The Farm Credit Administration's
                         Contracting Activities
                               A-17-02


                                Auditors
                              Sonya Cerne
                              Tori Kaufman
                              Tammy Rapp

                          Issued May 22, 2017




                        FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION
Farm Credit Administration                                        Office of Inspector General
                                                                   1501 Farm Credit Drive
                                                                   McLean, Virginia 22102-5090




 
 
 
May 22, 2017 
 
The Honorable Dallas P. Tonsager, Board Chairman  
The Honorable Jeffery S. Hall, Board Member  
Farm Credit Administration 
1501 Farm Credit Drive 
McLean, Virginia 22102‐5090 
              
Dear Board Chairman Tonsager and FCA Board Member Hall: 
 
The Office of Inspector General (OIG) completed an audit of the Farm Credit Administration’s (FCA or 
Agency) Contracting Activities.  The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA’s contracting 
process was effectively administered.   
 
We found the contracting process is effectively administered. FCA has implemented and/or augmented 
aspects of the contracting process to improve effectiveness and efficiency. Although FCA has made 
positive changes, we identified opportunities for further improvement to the contracting process. In 
response to our report, the Office of Agency Services (OAS) agreed to:    
 
   1. Develop a plan with milestones to ensure contract file documentation is complete.  Where 
       feasible, OAS will include automation options.  
    
   2. Provide all FCA Contracting Officer’s Representatives (CORs) with a handbook or other 
       educational/reference materials on documentation requirements, invoice reviews, and overall 
       responsibilities. 
 
   3. Revise the contract file content checklist to include a comprehensive checklist of steps from 
       solicitation to closeout in contract files. 
         
   4. Coordinate with the Office of General Counsel to develop contract language requiring contractors 
       to identify potential conflicts of interest throughout the performance of the contract, especially 
       in light of FCA’s regulatory mission. 
         
   5. Revise the contractor onboarding process to ensure required forms are obtained and placed in 
       the contract files. 
                   
   6. Update PPM 812, PPM 840, Office Directives, and the Contracts Desk Manual, to include the 
       following topics:  
            a. Contract closeout, 
            b. Conflict of interest statement requirements, 
             c. Legal reviews, 
             d. Contractor onboarding,  
             e. COR appointment threshold,  
             f. Section 508 compliance,  
             g. Standard contract clauses, and 
             h. Budget reporting process for contracts 
                 
    7. Develop a listing of standard contract clauses for FCA procurements and implement a policy to 
       ensure this repository is up to date.   
 
We appreciate the courtesies and professionalism extended by FCA personnel to the OIG staff.  If you 
have any questions about this audit, I would be pleased to meet with you at your convenience. 

 
Respectfully, 



                                                
Elizabeth M. Dean 
Inspector General 
 
Enclosure 
              


                                                                                                                                   




AGREED‐UPON ACTIONS: 
  
  


 In order to improve contract 
 administration, OAS agreed to: 
                       


     1. Develop a plan with milestones to           The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or Agency) is an independent Federal agency 
        ensure contract file documentation          responsible for regulating, examining, and supervising the Farm Credit System and the 
        is complete.  Where feasible, OAS           Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation. In order to fulfill mission requirements, 
        will include automation options.            the Agency executes and administers contracts to meet the needs of the Agency. As a 
     2. Provide all FCA CORs with a                 non‐appropriated Agency, FCA is not subject to the Office of Federal Procurement 
        handbook or other                           Policy Act or the Federal Acquisition Regulation.  
        educational/reference materials on           
        documentation requirements,                 The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA’s contracting process is 
        invoice reviews, and overall                effectively administered. We found the process is effectively administered, but needs 
        responsibilities.                           to make additional improvements, including: 
                                                     

     3. Revise the contract file content                   Our review identified examples where contracting procedures were not 
        checklist to include a comprehensive                followed. We identified two employee benefit contracts that did not include 
        checklist of steps from solicitation to             standard contract documentation and language. Both of these contracts also 
        closeout in contract files. 
                                                            needed to be ratified. Ratification refers to the approval of an unauthorized 
     4. Coordinate with the Office of                       commitment. Other contracts in our sample included errors in contract 
        General Counsel to develop contract                 documentation or unspecified payment terms.  
        language requiring contractors to 
        identify potential conflicts of interest           Contract clauses included in documentation were outdated, incomplete, 
        throughout the performance of the                   and/or missing. 13 of 29 contract files in our sample did include 
        contract, especially in light of FCA’s              documentation with standard clauses, and all 13 contained partially outdated 
        regulatory mission.                                 FAR references, dates, and/or titles. The Agency didn’t have a repository of 
     5. Revise the contractor onboarding                    required standard clauses. 
        process to ensure required forms are               Although the Agency developed and began using a form for contractor 
        obtained and placed in the contract                 onboarding, there was an inconsistent approach to how the onboarding 
        files.                                              process was initiated, documented, and updated. Forms were not always 
     6. Update PPM 812, PPM 840, Office                     completed and placed in the contract file, and the process for reviewing the 
        Directives, and the Contracts Desk                  form and determining required next steps was not always documented.  
        Manual, to include the following 
                                                           We noted various examples in our sample where documentation could be 
        topics:  
                                                            improved. Examples of documentation missing from official contract files 
          a. Contract closeout,                             included: letters designating the Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR), 
          b. Conflict of interest statement                 interagency agreements, statements of work, proposals, and evaluations of 
             requirements,                                  proposals. 
          c. Legal reviews,                                The Agency needs to revise aspects of the contracting process. Beyond the 
          d. Contractor onboarding,                         de‐obligation reporting process through Office of the Chief Financial Officer, 
                                                            contracting staff did not have a closeout process in place. Conflict of interest 
          e. COR appointment threshold,  
                                                            statements were not always required by contracting staff and officials 
          f. Section 508 compliance,                        involved in rating and selection. In addition, current processes for 
          g. Standard contract clauses, and                 accessibility and legal reviews of contract documents were not consistent and 
          h. Budget reporting process for                   fully documented.  
             contracts.                             The Office of Agency Services (OAS) agreed with our report and provided tasks to be 
     7. Develop a listing of standard               completed. OAS stated it would develop a contract documentation milestone plan, 
        contract clauses for FCA                    handbook, and revised checklist. OAS also plans to address potential conflicts of 
        procurements and implement a                interest in contract language, revise the contractor onboarding process, revise 
        policy to ensure this repository is up      policies and procedures, and develop a listing of standard contract clauses.    
        to date. 
 


                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

BACKGROUND _______________________________________________________________________  1 

Prior Reviews  ________________________________________________________________________  2 

AUDIT RESULTS  ______________________________________________________________________  3 

Contract Administration ________________________________________________________________  3 

    Following Contracting Procedures ____________________________________________________  3 
    Contract Clauses __________________________________________________________________  5 
    Contractor Onboarding  ____________________________________________________________  6 
    Documentation in Contract Files _____________________________________________________  6 
    Contributing Elements _____________________________________________________________  8 
Insufficient Processes __________________________________________________________________  8 

    Closeout Process  _________________________________________________________________  8 
    Conflict of Interest ________________________________________________________________  9 
    Accessibility Reviews  ______________________________________________________________  9 
    Legal Review ____________________________________________________________________  10 
    Budget Reporting ________________________________________________________________  10 
    Contributing Factors ______________________________________________________________  10 
Contracting Importance and Significance  _________________________________________________  10 

Agreed‐Upon Actions 1‐7 ______________________________________________________________  11 

OBJECTIVE, SCOPE, AND METHODOLOGY  ________________________________________________  13 

ACRONYMS  ________________________________________________________________________  14 

 

 
BACKGROUND

    The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or Agency) is an independent Federal agency responsible for 
    regulating, examining, and supervising the Farm Credit System and the Federal Agricultural Mortgage 
    Corporation. The mission of the Agency is to ensure a safe, sound, and dependable source of credit and 
    related services for agriculture and rural America.  
     
    In order to fulfill mission requirements, the Agency executes and administers contracts and agreements 
    to meet the needs of the Agency. As a non‐appropriated Agency, FCA is not subject to the Office of 
    Federal Procurement Policy Act or the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). Although not required, FCA 
    has used the FAR as guidance for contracting activity. 
     
    Contracting Staff 
    The FCA Chairman has delegated contracting authority to the Agency’s primary Contracting Officer in 
    Delegation 09, Delegation to Serve as Contracting Officer. The Agency has a second Contracting Officer 
    with a purchasing limit of $150,000 as of 2017. Contracting Officers enter into, administer, and 
    terminate contracting actions on behalf of FCA.  
     
    The Agency also utilizes contract specialists who assist the Contracting Officers, maintain contract files, 
    and communicate with staff on procurement actions. The Agency has one Contracting Specialist but has 
    an ongoing contract for another temporary Contracting Specialist. For selected contracts, a Contracting 
    Officer’s Representative (COR) is also chosen from FCA program offices. The COR is generally responsible 
    for developing contract specifications, determining when contract changes are needed, and monitoring 
    the contractor’s performance of technical requirements. 
     
    Contracting Process 
    Contracting is a multi‐step process which is monitored and modified as needed throughout the period of 
    performance. The first phase of the process requires determining the needs of the program office and 
    defining requirements, deliverables, and milestones. A statement of work can be used to solicit 
    proposals and identify qualified contractors in consulting, advisory, and assistance services contracts. 
    Once a contractor is selected, contractual documents are finalized and the contract is formally executed. 
    An executed contract is officially agreed‐upon by both parties.  
     
    An option year, identified as potential continued performance, gives the agency the ability to execute 
    the contract for an additional year, if needed and appropriate. The option year is exercised through a 
    modification of the original award. This is completed prior to the end of the period of performance of 
    the award. 
     
    Agency Policies and Procedures 
    The Agency’s contracting procedures are primarily documented in Policies and Procedures Manual 
    (PPM) 812, Contracting/Procurement Policy. PPM 812 establishes guidelines to help meet the goal to 
    acquire products and services that will provide the best value to the FCA in a timely manner that most 
    effectively meets program needs. PPM 812 also states, “the acquisition process shall, accordingly, 
    encourage flexibility, innovation, responsiveness, and the use of sound business judgment.” FCA also 
    documents its contracting process in the Contracts Desk Manual, other office directives, and PPM 840, 
    Role and Responsibility of the Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative.  
     


                                                         1 
Prior	Reviews	
In 2011, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) conducted an audit, Contracting Activities (A‐11‐01), to 
determine whether FCA’s contracting environment was efficient and effective in acquiring products and 
services that provided the best value to FCA. As a result of the audit, the Agency took the following 
actions prior to issuance of the final report: 
 
    1. Obtained a legal opinion on examiner assistant contracts being inconsistent with Federal and 
        Agency guidelines resulting in non‐governmental contractors performing an inherently 
        governmental function and providing personal services and took appropriate action; 

    2. Included in the Agency’s ethics and contracting program an Agency policy on acceptable and 
       prohibited conditions relevant to contracting practices with former FCA and FCS employees and 
       examples of prohibited contract award practices; 

    3. Strengthened internal controls over the contract administration function by performing 
       quarterly and annual reviews; 

    4. Established a policy that identifies training required of the contracting officer and contract 
       specialist; 

    5. Ensured the contracting officer and contract specialist develop an annual training plan; 

    6. Revised the Contracts Desk Manual; and, 

    7. Addressed the inconsistency in delegated authority to the contracting officer. 

The OIG also conducted an inspection, IT Equipment Acquisition (I‐12‐01), to determine whether the 
Agency’s acquisition process for IT equipment was appropriately planned and administered. As a result 
of the audit, the Agency took the following actions: 
 
    1. Defined rating numbers on the laptop evaluation form; 

    2. Included evaluation committee members in the entire evaluation and laptop recommendation 
       process; 

    3. Required all staff involved in the model and vendor selection process to sign a conflict‐of‐
       interest statement; and 

    4. Identified an evaluation method to apply on all IT equipment purchases. 

All agreed‐upon actions were closed in September 2012.  
 
 
 
 
 




                                                     2 
AUDIT RESULTS
      
     The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA’s contracting process is effectively 
     administered. We found the process is effectively administered, but there are opportunities for 
     additional improvements. FCA has implemented and/or augmented aspects of the contracting process 
     to improve effectiveness and efficiency: 
      
          During our last audit in 2011, the Agency had one Contracting Officer and one Contract 
             Specialist. Since then, FCA has increased the overall contracting staff to include two Contracting 
             Officers and two Contracting Specialists (one is a full‐time FCA employee and one is a temporary 
             contractor).   
            Contracting staff are qualified and trained according to internal policies and procedures. The 
             Contracts Desk Manual states contracting personnel will receive at least 80 hours of training 
             within a two‐year period. We did not identify any exceptions to the training requirements.   
            FCA maintained a system for contract files. Contracting staff had a systematic approach to how 
             the files would be maintained and began using a checklist for file completeness. Even though 
             the contract files are stored in hard copy form, every file requested was available and 
             maintained at FCA. 
            Contracting personnel are working with FCA’s Office of Information Technology to automate 
             some of the contracting processes. There have been discussions on automating a form for 
             contractor onboarding and using additional features in the contracting system to increase 
             efficiencies. 
      
     Although FCA has made positive changes, we identified opportunities for further improvements to 
     contract administration and processes.  
      
     Contract	Administration	
      
     In order to answer our objective, we sampled and reviewed 29 contract files from fiscal years 2015 and 
     2016. The contract files we reviewed totaled approximately $6.1 million.  From our review, we identified 
     areas that could be improved including: contract procedures, contract clauses, contractor onboarding, 
     and documentation.   

                                        Following Contracting Procedures 
      
     As a non‐appropriated fund Agency, FCA is not subject to the FAR. Procurement requirements are 
     established in Agency policies and procedures. FCA contracting procedures are designed to ensure 
     decisions are justified, documented, and the best value for the Agency. Contracting procedures 
     generally include: defining requirements, evaluating prices and qualified providers, establishing a 
     technical representative to oversee the contract, and maintaining and documenting an official contract 
     file.  
      
      
      
      



                                                         3 
The following are examples of procedures not followed:  
         
     For an employee benefit contract, we noted a difference in the FCA contract language and 
        documentation. Instead of using standard Agency language, the agreements were written by the 
        contractor. The competitive process was also not fully utilized. Although the contract file 
        documented FCA personnel involvement and legal reviews, the Agency did not issue standard 
        contract documentation and language, which is usually incorporated in the statement of work. 
        The competitive process included several proposals through a broker and verbal requests, but 
        did not have a consistent, comprehensive evaluation process. Ratings or scorings were not used 
        even though different vendors and proposals were considered. Personnel also stated that 
        comparisons were made with other financial regulators, but the fee structure was not part of 
        the comparison. Overall, without a fully documented contract file and a competitive process 
        showing evaluation of the options considered, it is difficult to know whether the company was 
        the best value for the Agency.  
       For a different employee benefit contract, the documentation showed inadvertent payment to 
        the company, and competition used to select the vendor was not consistently documented. The 
        Agency overpaid the company for services to be provided which resulted in confusion and 
        inefficiencies when trying to recover the funds. Although not in the contract file, when we 
        inquired concerning the extent to which the contract was competed, the Agency provided one 
        other proposal it had considered. However, rating/scoring sheets documenting the evaluation of 
        both companies were not in the contract file.  
 
Both of the examples above also had contracts that needed to be ratified. Ratification refers to the 
approval of an unauthorized, nonbinding agreement. An unauthorized commitment occurs when the 
FCA representative lacks the authority to enter into the agreement. The Contracts Desk Manual states 
the following:  
 
         “An  unauthorized  commitment…  shall  be  coordinated  with  the  FCA  Contracting 
         Officer. Ratification by the FCA Contracting Officer shall be made only after proper 
         expenditure  authority  has  been  obtained…  The  FCA  should  take  positive  action  to 
         preclude,  to  the maximum extent possible, the need for ratification of  contracting 
         actions.” 
 
In one case, the vendor had not renewed its registration in the System for Award Management, where 
companies register to do business with the Federal government. So, the modification to award the 
option year could not be exercised. However, FCA was still receiving services from the company without 
a binding agreement. Contract staff were in contact with the vendor throughout the process and 
documenting that employee benefits would not be affected by the lack of renewal. In the other 
example, there was an oversight by the COR and contracting staff, so the option year was not exercised 
in a timely manner. This resulted again in receiving services from the company without a binding 
agreement.  
 
We also identified other examples where procedures were not followed, including: 
  
      For one contract we reviewed, the statement of work was prepared based on hourly rates. 
         Subsequently, the contract was awarded based on fixed‐price milestones, not hourly rates. The 
         statement of work was not updated, and the COR and contracting staff stated this was an error. 



                                                   4 
        The payment schedule for this contract also did not correspond to the invoiced amounts paid. 
        The contractor was paid for partial completion of their first milestone deliverable, contrary to 
        the schedule established in the contract.  
       Another long‐term contract did not identify invoicing details in the statement of work. The 
        documentation did not define what payments would be based on or how frequent the 
        payments would be made on the contract.  
       Another contract had a modification completed after the period of performance had expired. 
        The modification was executed to pay an outstanding invoice. Agency officials stated this was 
        based on agreement by both parties; however, this was not documented in the contract file.  
       Another contract was inadvertently initiated, but later canceled. Personnel had to cancel the 
        contract after it was initiated instead of exercising the option year. This was discovered after the 
        contractor sent invoices that were declined for payment.  

                                               Contract Clauses 

As noted above, FCA is not subject to the FAR. However, FCA elects to include, by reference, certain 
applicable FAR clauses in certain contract documents. The following clauses are generally referenced:  
 
                 FAR             Title 
                 Subpart 
                 52.202‐1       Definitions 

                 52.203‐3       Gratuities 

                 52.203‐5       Covenant Against Contingent Fees 

                 52.203‐7       Anti‐Kickback Procedures 

                 52.203‐13      Contractor Code of Business Ethics and Conduct 

                 52.204‐9       Personal Identity Verification of Contractor Personnel 

                 52.222‐55      Minimum Wages Under Executive Order 13658 

                 52.239‐1       Privacy or Security Safeguards 

                 52.242‐15      Stop‐Work Order 

                 52.243‐1       Changes – Fixed Price 

                 52.243‐3       Changes – Time and Materials or Labor‐Hours 

                 52.246‐6       Inspection of Services 

                 52.246‐25      Limitation of Liability ‐ Services 

 



                                                       5 
These clauses cover important requirements and serve as part of the legal, binding agreements between 
FCA and those providing goods and services to the Agency. FCA’s PPM 812, Contracting Procurement 
Policy, states FCA General Provisions shall be incorporated into all contracts and that OAS will maintain a 
database of standard clauses to be used when applicable.   
 
We reviewed contract file documentation that included standard contract clauses. We found the 
contract clauses included in the documentation were outdated, incomplete, and/or missing. Of our 
sampled contracts, 13 contract files contained documentation with the standard clauses. However, all 
13 contained partially outdated FAR references, dates, and/or titles.  
 
In addition, because several of the contracts did not have statements of work issued to the 
individuals/companies/agencies doing business with FCA, the standard contract clauses were not part of 
the contract. As one example, a large employee benefit contract was implemented with no statement of 
work or standard clauses. Although the Agency entered into a contract that included the business’s 
contract information, FCA’s standard clauses were not included. In general, FCA includes the standard 
clauses as additional protection to the Agency.  

                                         Contractor Onboarding 

FCA’s contractor onboarding process needs improvement. There was an inconsistent approach to how 
this process was initiated, documented, and updated. The Contracts Desk Manual states the Contract 
Specialist is responsible for notifying the Information Technology (IT) Security Specialist when a 
contracting/procurement action requires the hiring of a contractor/consultant who will require access to 
FCA’s IT systems. 
 
Confidentiality agreements are another component of contractor onboarding. Contracting personnel 
stated confidentiality agreements should always be signed and in the contract file, if applicable. 
However, the Agency did not have a clear process for determining when confidentiality agreements are 
needed and ensuring appropriate individuals signed an agreement.  
 
The Agency developed and began using a contractor onboarding form in 2015. The form covers the 
contractor’s work schedule at FCA facilities, accesses to sensitive data and systems, and use of Agency 
equipment. An email was issued to all CORs to use the form. We found that the forms were not always 
completed nor placed in contract files. There appeared to be confusion on when the form was needed 
and who makes that determination. The process for reviewing the form and determining required next 
steps was not always documented. The contracting staff is working with the Office of Information 
Technology to try and automate the process but has had difficulties in implementation.  

                                    Documentation in Contract Files 

We noted various examples in our sample where documentation could be improved. We reviewed 29 
contract files to ensure documentation was sufficient to address:  
 
    justification for goods or services to be purchased; 
       specifications, requirements, and milestones; 
       competition or basis for selection; 




                                                     6 
       conflicts of interest; and 
       oversight. 
 
When a COR is designated by the Contracting Officer, a copy of the COR designation letter is placed in 
the contract file. 8 of the 29 contract files we sampled were missing the COR designation letter. In many 
cases, even though the form was missing from the file, the Contract File Content Checklist, which lists 
standard documentation, stated a letter was completed and included. We also identified conflicting 
information in internal policies and procedures. PPM 840 states a COR should be designated when a 
contract or purchase order is expected to exceed $100,000. However, PPM 812 and the Contracts Desk 
Manual state a COR will be appointed for all contracts and procurements over $5,000. There were also 
inconsistencies on whether interagency agreements needed a COR designation.  
 
Another contract file in our sample did not contain the interagency agreement or statement of work. As 
a direct contrast, another interagency agreement in our sample, with the same government agency, 
included both documents. Without these key documents, we could not review deliverables and 
milestones. As of March 2017, contracting officials stated a copy of the interagency agreement had been 
requested.   
 
We identified errors in the memoranda completed by the Contracting Specialist in our sample. In several 
contract files, the Contracting Specialist wrote a memorandum to file summarizing the steps taken for a 
procurement action. This memorandum was useful in identifying: 
 
      the type of source selection, 
       modifications to the request for proposals,  
       listing of proposals received,  
       evaluation conclusions, and 
       selection made. 
 
In two examples, some of the final quotes received did not match the quotes stated in the Contracting 
Specialist’s memoranda. In both examples, the errors would not have altered the selection since the 
company ultimately selected was documented as the best value to the Agency.  
 
On another contract in our sample, we observed an increase in the quantity for goods purchased from 
the original requisition, but the requisition was not revised justifying and approving the increase in 
quantity. Documentation of the increased quantity was limited to an email from the COR to the 
Contracting Specialist and approving official on the requisition. 
 
As part of our review, we followed up with CORs to determine whether documentation existed that was 
not placed in the contract file. We noted various examples such as proposals, evaluations of proposals, 
statements of work, and conflict of interest statements that were provided by the COR or Contracting 
Specialist, but not included in the official contract file.  




                                                    7 
                                         Contributing Elements  

Several causes contributed to the issues identified for improvement. FCA maintained paper contract 
files, and contract documents were mostly generated manually. Program offices generate requisitions 
and initiate modifications, based on Agency needs. FCA’s contracting staff documents contracting 
actions and maintains official contract files. Currently, contracting staff may send and receive 
documentation electronically from CORs or the contractor, and these documents must be printed and 
manually placed in the contract file. In addition, processes such as exercising option years and 
contractor onboarding rely on the COR to track due dates and initiate paper forms, which contributed to 
some of the issues identified in our review. Electronic, automated systems will streamline the 
contracting process and improve consistency, completeness, and timeliness.  
 
FCA currently uses a centralized document management and storage system. A similar approach could 
be used for contract files. With this type of system, both contracting staff and CORs could access and 
store documentation in one location. This will decrease duplication and ensure documentation is 
maintained efficiently by eliminating unnecessary steps in the current process. 
 
Other factors also affected documentation inconsistencies. FCA developed a Contract File Content 
Checklist that lists standard documentation. The checklist was designed to be completed multiple times 
as the contract is modified, and as noted previously, checklists were not always accurate. Beyond the 
checklist, FCA does not prescribe documentation requirements for contract files, but officials stated the 
contract file should include documentation from pre‐award through award. CORs take required training 
on their roles and responsibilities; however, there are no reference materials to help ensure records are 
complete and consistent. 
 
For contract clauses, FCA’s PPM 812, Contracting Procurement Policy, states that the Agency would 
maintain a database of standard FCA clauses to be used when applicable. Neither a database nor other 
informational repository was currently maintained to ensure standard clauses were correct and 
complete. 

Insufficient	Processes	
Overall, we identified several contracting processes that the Agency has not consistently implemented 
or that need improvement, including: contract closeout, conflict of interest declarations, accessibility 
reviews, legal reviews, and budget reporting.   

                                            Closeout Process	

The Agency does not have a consistent closeout process. FCA’s Contracts Desk Manual states that the 
COR is responsible for initiating administrative closeout of a contract and ensuring closeout procedures 
are complete. COR closeout procedures include ensuring physical property is returned, the contractor’s 
final invoice was submitted, and contract funds are reviewed and excess funds de‐obligated. Once these 
actions are completed, Contracting staff are then responsible for documenting completion of the 
requirements and closing out the contract file.  The Agency did not follow this process. 
 
Each quarter of the fiscal year, the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) staff sends a listing of 
open purchase orders/contracts to each COR and asks them to identify funds to be de‐obligated. OCFO 
staff sends a de‐obligation report to contracting staff identifying excess funds, if applicable. Beyond the 



                                                     8 
de‐obligation reporting process through OCFO staff, other aspects of closeout were not documented 
and included in contract files. The Contract File Content Checklist addressed closeout; however, this 
section was incomplete for many of the contracts reviewed in our sample.  

                                                           Conflict of Interest 

Conflict of interest declarations could be improved. Agency procedures state that FCA employees shall 
not take part in any action that may result in or create the appearance of a loss of complete 
independence and impartiality. Furthermore, employees purchasing goods and services shall conduct 
themselves so as to avoid even the appearance of any impropriety or conflict of interest.  
 
As a result of a previous OIG inspection, a process of signing a conflict of interest statement was put in 
place for staff involved in selections for large IT acquisitions. FCA’s Guidance for Project Management of 
Large Information Technology Projects defines “large” IT acquisitions as more than $500,000. The 
agency should consider lowering the threshold for requiring conflict of interest statements for all 
procurements and staff involved in the procurement process.  
 
Conflicts of interest are especially important given the Agency’s unique regulatory role. FCA contracts do 
not contain a specific provision requiring contractors to report any conflicts of interest that may exist or 
arise during the period of performance. Actual and potential conflicts of interest are not limited to 
specific types of acquisitions and must be evaluated continuously during the contracting process.   

                                                         Accessibility Reviews 

FCA developed guidance and created a standard form to assist offices performing Section 508 reviews to 
ensure compliance, but inconsistently documented Section 508 compliance reviews.  

FCA’s Section 508 Guidance states the following:  

           “Section 508 refers to a statutory section in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (found at 29 U.S.C. 
           794d), whose primary purpose is to provide access to, and use of, Federal executive agencies’ 
           electronic and information technology (EIT1) by individuals with disabilities, including both 
           federal employees and the general public. Accessible technology is the type that can be 
           accessed or operated in a variety of ways and does not rely on a single sense or ability of the 
           user.” 

In most cases, information technology products were reviewed for compliance with Section 508. If a 
product is not compliant or partially compliant, Section 508 requires agencies to provide reasonable 
accommodations to EIT for employees with disabilities. However, Section 508 compliance review 
documentation was inconsistent, incomplete, or missing accommodations or Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) approval. In two examples, a compliance review was performed, but not signed by the Section 508 
Coordinator. In another example, a product was determined to be partially compliant, but did not 
indicate whether accommodations were made or approved by the CIO. Lastly, a different partially 
compliant product lacked a Section 508 compliance review form. However, a Voluntary Product 
                                                            
1
   EIT is defined as “Any equipment or interconnected system or subsystem of equipment used in the creation, conversion, or duplication of data 
or information. The term EIT includes, but is not limited to, telecommunications products (such as telephones), information kiosks and 
transaction machines, World Wide Web sites, multimedia, and office equipment such as copiers and fax machines.” Typically, it includes 
personal computers and their peripherals, software, and the IT infrastructure. 
 



                                                                       9 
Accessibility Template representing the vendor’s assessment of accessibility features was obtained at 
the time of procurement showing the product was partially compliant. A form was later provided with 
the CIO’s approval that was dated after the procurement stating, “data visualization tools are typically 
not Section 508 compliant”. The CIO provided a justification that purchasing a fully compliant product 
would result in an undue burden to the Agency. 
 
                                              Legal Review 
 
FCA’s current legal review process needs to be updated. Agency policy requires solicitation and contract 
documents (exceeding a minimum dollar threshold) to be reviewed by the Office of General Counsel for 
legal sufficiency. The policy states a memorandum will be prepared and provided to contracting 
personnel concerning legal sufficiency. However, this was not always documented in the contract files in 
our sample.  
 
Previously, the Agency had one Contracting Officer who is also an attorney. Because the Contracting 
Officer reviews and signs contract documentation, officials stated this constituted a legal sufficiency 
review. The Agency designated another Contracting Officer in February 2016, who is not an attorney, so 
the legal sufficiency review process should be revised.  
 
                                            Budget Reporting 
 
FCA provided procurement data for the fiscal years in our scope. In reviewing this data to select our 
sample, we identified errors in the consulting services and single source table included in the Agency’s 
fiscal year 2017 proposed budget and performance plan. Contracting staff stated the information in that 
listing was generated by manually reviewing paper contract files, and this process would be revised 
immediately to prevent errors in information submitted in the future.  
 
                                          Contributing Factors 
 
There were several contributing factors to the insufficient processes identified. Contracting policies and 
procedures were outdated. Various references need to be updated to reflect current offices, individuals, 
and responsibilities. There is an inconsistency in PPM 840, regarding the threshold for appointing CORs. 
In addition, established policies and procedures did not fully address contract closeout, legal sufficiency 
reviews, contractor onboarding, conflict of interest declarations, and Section 508 compliance. 
 
For the budgeting process, the Agency stated its new process going forward would use the procurement 
system where contract and purchase order information is maintained. In addition, officials stated they 
would obtain a list from the OCFO to identify all contracts awarded using the budget code for consulting 
services. This process has not been documented. 
 
Contracting	Importance	and	Significance 
 
Across the government, contracting has consistently been identified as a high risk area. At FCA, 
contractor goods and services fill critical needs. Controls, oversight, and complete contracts mitigate 
important risks to the Agency. In cases of disputes, errors, or noncompliance with requirements, 
contract files and supporting documentation are critical in protecting the Agency’s interests. Contract 




                                                    10 
documentation also provides an important historical record that may be referenced during future 
procurement activities. 
 
The contracting process and corresponding procedures support best value selection. Best value 
selections help to ensure resources are available for the Agency’s highest priority needs. Because 
contracting decisions are based on many, unique factors, it is important for justifications and 
evaluations to be documented and maintained. Automating and standardizing required contracting 
documentation provides greater assurance that a consistent effective process is applied across the 
Agency.  
 
Knowledgeable personnel and multiple levels of review contribute to the integrity of the contracting 
process. Because FCA is not subject to the FAR, policies and procedures prescribe essential standards 
and principles for contracting. As personnel changes occur over time, FCA requirements must continue 
to provide a framework for efficient, effective contracting activities.  

Agreed‐Upon	Actions	1‐7	

In order to improve contract administration, OAS agreed to: 
                   
   1. Develop a plan with milestones to ensure contract file documentation is complete.  Where 
       feasible, OAS will include automation options. 
        
   2. Provide all FCA CORs with a handbook or other educational/reference materials on 
       documentation requirements, invoice reviews, and overall responsibilities. 
          
   3. Revise the contract file content checklist to include a comprehensive checklist of steps from 
       solicitation to closeout in contract files. 
        
   4. Coordinate with the Office of General Counsel to develop contract language requiring contractors 
       to identify potential conflicts of interest throughout the performance of the contract, especially 
       in light of FCA’s regulatory mission. 
        
   5. Revise the contractor onboarding process to ensure required forms are obtained and placed in 
       the contract files. 
    
   6. Update PPM 812, PPM 840, Office Directives, and the Contracts Desk Manual, to include the 
       following topics:  
            a. Contract closeout, 
            b.   Conflict of interest statement requirements, 
            c.   Legal reviews, 
            d.   Contractor onboarding,  
            e.   COR appointment threshold,  
            f.   Section 508 compliance,  
            g.   Standard contract clauses, and 
            h.   Budget reporting process for contracts. 



                                                    11 
   7. Develop a listing of standard contract clauses for FCA procurements and implement a policy to 
      ensure this repository is up to date.  
 
OAS agreed with our report and provided tasks to be completed. OAS stated it would develop a contract 
documentation milestone plan, handbook, and revised checklist. OAS also plans to address potential conflicts 
of interest in contract language, revise the contractor onboarding process, revise policies and procedures, 
and develop a listing of standard contract clauses.                                   




                                                    12 
OBJECTIVE, SCOPE, AND METHODOLOGY
      
     The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA’s contracting process is effectively 
     administered. We conducted the audit at FCA’s Headquarters in McLean, VA from December 2016 
     through May 2017. We limited our scope to contracts and agreements contracts awarded from October 
     1, 2014 through September 30, 2016.  
      
     We took the following steps to accomplish the objective: 
      
               Identified and reviewed applicable Federal laws, regulations, and guidance related to the 
                objective. 

               Reviewed prior audits and inspections related to the audit objective.  

               Reviewed Agency policies and procedures related to the procurement process. 

               Conducted interviews with the Director of the Office of Agency Services, Supervisory 
                Administrative Operations Specialist and Contracting Officer, Contracting Officer, Contracting 
                Specialist, and others with responsibility for contract administration and oversight. 

               Identified significant internal control processes and determined if they are operating effectively 
                and efficiently. 

               Assess the risk of fraud and illegal acts occurring within the context of the objective.  

               Reviewed contracting staff qualifications and trainings.   

               Reviewed contracting activities performed from October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2016. 
                Judgmentally sampled 29 contract files based on award type, amount, vendor, and award 
                descriptions. Micropurchase awards were excluded from our sample. The sample was 
                judgmental and cannot be projected over the entire population. 

               Reviewed sampled contract files for contract administration, justifications, and documentation.  

               Evaluated contract clauses for completeness and accuracy.  

         This audit was performed in accordance with the Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards. 
         Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence 
         to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We 
         assessed internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations to the extent necessary to satisfy 
         the objective. Because our review was limited, it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal 
         control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit. We assessed the computer‐
         processed data relevant to our audit objective and determined that the data was sufficiently reliable. 
         We assessed the risk of fraud related to our audit objectives in the course of evaluating audit evidence. 
         Overall, we believe the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our conclusions based on our 
         audit objective.                                  




                                                             13 
ACRONYMS
     

           CIO        Chief Information Officer 

           COR        Contracting Officer’s Representative 

           EIT        Electronic and Information Technology 

           FAR        Federal Acquisition Regulation 

           FCA        Farm Credit Administration 

           IT         Information Technology 

           OAS        Office of Agency Services 

           OCFO       Office of the Chief Financial Officer 

           OIG        Office of Inspector General 

           PPM        Policies and Procedures Manual 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     




                                                   14 
       R E P O R T  
                             

    Fraud  |  Waste  |  Abuse  |  Mismanagement 
 




                                            
                             


        FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION 
        OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL 
                             




     Phone: Toll Free (800) 437‐7322; (703) 883‐4316 
                                  
                   Fax: (703) 883‐4059 
                                  
             E‐mail: fca‐ig‐hotline@rcn.com 
                                  
            Mail: Farm Credit Administration 
               Office of Inspector General 
                  1501 Farm Credit Drive 
                 McLean, VA 22102‐5090 




                           15