oversight

FCA's Special Supervision and Enforcement Processes

Published by the Farm Credit Administration, Office of Inspector General on 2015-03-31.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

OFFICE OF
INSPECTOR GENER!L       !udit Report
                    Farm Credit !dministration’s
                       Special Supervision and
                       Enforcement Processes
                               !-15-01

                         !uditor-in-Charge
                           Sonya Cerne

                       Issued March 31, 2015




                      F!RM CREDIT !DMINISTR!TION
Farm Credit Administration	                                    Office of Inspector General
                                                               1501 Farm Credit Drive
                                                               McLean, Virginia 22102-5090




                 
                 
March 31, 2015 
 
The Honorable Kenneth A. Spearman, Board Chairman  
The Honorable Dallas P. Tonsager, Board Member 
The Honorable Jeffrey S. Hall, Board Member  
Farm Credit Administration 
1501 Farm Credit Drive 
McLean, Virginia  22102‐5090 
             
Dear Board Chairman Spearman and FCA Board Members Tonsager and Hall: 
 
The Office of Inspector General (OIG) completed an audit of the FCA’s Special Supervision and 
Enforcement Processes.  The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA is following 
the special supervision and enforcement processes and monitoring institution compliance 
effectively. 
 
During our audit, we found that FCA is generally following the processes and monitoring 
compliance.  Preliminary decisions, formal decisions made through the Regulatory Enforcement 
Committee, and recommendations to the Board are clearly documented.  Justifications to 
initiate actions are in supporting documentation, and FCA documents the special supervision 
and enforcement processes.  We also found that the Watch List is effective, identification and 
escalation of concerns were appropriate, complexity and length of actions are correlated, and 
persistent involvement and communication leads to corrective action. 
 
We would like to highlight the responsive actions the Office of Examination (OE) plans to take 
to address opportunities to improve or modify the processes identified during the audit.  OE 
agreed to the following actions: 
                 
         1.	 Develop a training program for special supervision and enforcement actions to 
              ensure the organization has the knowledge to react to the changing FCS 
              environment. 
               
         2.	 Emphasize the requirement of FCA Regulation 612, Subpart B, and provide training 
              and/or education to examiners on the role and responsibility FCA has regarding the 
              criminal referral form and to ensure institutions are filing the form as required. 
       3.	 Address the use of informal ratings and other supervisory letters by either 
           expanding or changing current directives and/or processes to include when they are 
           appropriate and how they will be used. 
             
We appreciate the courtesies and professionalism extended to OIG staff by FCA personnel.  If 
you have any questions about this audit, I would be pleased to meet with you at your 
convenience. 
 
Respectfully, 


                                           
Elizabeth M. Dean
 
Inspector General
 
            
Enclosure 
                                    




 
OBJECTIVE: 
To determine whether FCA is 
following the special 
supervision and enforcement 
processes and monitoring 
institution compliance 
effectively. 
                                   The Farm Credit Administration (FCA) regulates and supervises Farm Credit 
 
                                   System (FCS or System) institutions.  When weaknesses or problems arise or 
BACKGROUND: 
                                   correction is necessary, FCA has a proactive supervisory process to address 
The mission of the FCA is to 
                                   issues of concern.  These processes have developed through time and 
promote a safe, sound and 
                                   experience and have most often returned problem institutions to healthy 
dependable source of credit 
                                   conditions.   
for agriculture and rural 
                                    
America.  FCA is responsible 
                                   We found preliminary decisions, formal decisions made through the 
for regulating and examining 
                                   Regulatory Enforcement Committee, and recommendations to the FCA 
the FCS and the Federal 
                                   Board are clearly documented.  Justification to initiate the special supervision 
Agricultural Mortgage 
                                   and enforcement actions are in Reports of Examination, memoranda, and 
Corporation, the nation’s two 
                                   communications with the institutions.  FCA also documents the special 
agricultural Government‐
                                   supervision and enforcement processes through:  FCA Board policies, policies 
sponsored enterprises.  FCA’s 
                                   and directives, sections of the Examination Manual, and RSD procedures.   
Office of Examination (OE) 
                                    
conducts examinations of FCS 
                                   During the audit, we found: 
banks and associations.  If 
                                    
examiners identify concerns 
                                         the Watch List is effective;  
with institutions through 
                                         identification and escalation of concerns were appropriate; 
examination activities, they 
                                         complexity and length of actions are correlated; and, 
may refer the institution to 
OE’s Risk Supervision Division           persistent involvement and communication leads to corrective 
(RSD) for possible supervision              action.   
or enforcement actions.  The        
Farm Credit Act of 1971, as        We also identified a few opportunities to improve or modify the processes 
amended, provides the FCA          through: 
with statutory enforcement          
authorities.  In general, there          increasing staff readiness;  
are three levels of                      ensuring institutions adhere to the criminal referral process 
supervision used by FCA for                 requirements; and, 
FCS institutions:  normal                expanding or changing current directives and/or processes. 
supervision, special                
supervision, and                   There are three agreed‐upon actions to improve the oversight of special 
enforcement.  Each level           supervision and enforcement actions.     
provides increased                  
monitoring and involvement 
with the institution.   
 
                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

BACKGROUND____________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                        1
 

    Prior OIG Reviews_______________________________________________________________________
                                                                                              3
 

AUDIT RESULTS ___________________________________________________________________________ 4
 

    Watch List Effectiveness__________________________________________________________________ 5
 

    Identification and Escalation of Concerns____________________________________________________
                                                                                                   5
 

    Complexity Correlates with the Length of Time Under Special Supervision and Enforcement Actions  ___ 7
 

    Persistent Involvement and Communication with Institutions ___________________________________ 8
 

    Improvements to the Special Supervision and Enforcement Processes ____________________________ 9
 

      Staff Readiness ______________________________________________________________________ 10
 

      Agreed‐Upon Action 1 ________________________________________________________________ 11
 

      Criminal Referrals____________________________________________________________________
                                                                                              11
 

      Agreed‐Upon Action 2 ________________________________________________________________ 12
 

      Special Supervision and Enforcement Directives and Processes _______________________________ 12
 

      Agreed‐Upon Action 3 ________________________________________________________________ 13
 

OBJECTIVE, SCOPE, AND METHODOLOGY _____________________________________________________ 14
 

ACRONYMS _____________________________________________________________________________ 15
 

 

 
BACKGROUND

    The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or Agency) is an independent agency in the Executive Branch of the 
    U.S. Government.  The mission of the FCA is to promote a safe, sound and dependable source of credit 
    for agriculture and rural America.  FCA is responsible for regulating and examining the Farm Credit 
    System (FCS or System) and the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (commonly referred to as 
    Farmer Mac), the nation’s two agricultural Government‐sponsored enterprises.  FCA’s Office of 
    Examination (OE) conducts examinations of FCS banks and associations to ensure their safety, 
    soundness, and compliance with laws and regulations.  Sections 5.25 through 5.38 (12 U.S.C. § 2261‐
    2274) of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended, provides the FCA with statutory enforcement 
    authorities to take action for unsafe, unsound practices or for violations of law, rule or regulation. 
     
    FCA examiners utilize the Financial Institution                      Current FIRS Ratings of FCS 
    Rating System (FIRS) to rate, evaluate, and 
    categorize FCS institutions.  Under FIRS, each                                 Institutions
    institution receives a composite rating and six              4 Rated       3 Rated       2 Rated        1 Rated
    component ratings based on Capital, Assets, 
    Management, Earnings, Liquidity, and 
    Sensitivity, collectively known as CAMELS.  The                                    1               1
    ratings range from 1 to 5 for each component                      7                4               3
    and the composite, with a 1 indicating strong 
    performance and a 5 indicating poor 
    performance.  Examiners rate institutions each                   29               33              32
    quarter or any time there is a material change.  
    FCA discloses the ratings to the institution 
    through a letter to the board chairman and 
    chief executive officer annually and whenever a 
    composite or component rating is changed.  
    Currently, about 95 percent of institutions have 
                                                                     46               43              44
    a composite rating of 1 or 2.  The chart to the 
    right shows the number of institutions rated 1‐
    4 for the June 2014, September 2014, and 
    December 2014 periods, according to OE.  
    There are currently no 5 rated institutions and 
                                                                  Jun‐14          Sep‐14           Dec‐14
    one 4 rated institution.   
     
    If examiners identify concerns with institutions through examination activities, they may refer the 
    institution to OE’s Risk Supervision Division (RSD) for possible special supervision or enforcement 
    actions.  RSD is responsible for managing and administering special supervision and enforcement 
    processes.  RSD assigns an enforcement examiner to each institution under special supervision and/or 
    enforcement action.  RSD coordinates with the OE examination division to determine if recommended 
    actions are needed, and they work in tandem throughout the process.  When an enforcement action is 
    contemplated, an attorney from the Office of General Counsel is also assigned to the action.   
     
     
     
     


                                                          1 
                                                Supervision Levels 
 
When there are indicators of potential problems or weaknesses within an institution, OE uses proactive 
measures as an alert and to increase monitoring in a tiered approach.  In general, there are three levels 
of supervision of FCS institutions by FCA:  normal supervision, special supervision, and enforcement.  
                                Each level provides increased monitoring, communication, and involvement 
                                    with the institution.  FCA uses normal supervision when institutions are 
                                       operating in a safe and sound manner.  This includes normal 
                                         examination activities and monitoring practices.  OE also maintains 
                        Enforcement         a Watch List for institutions in normal supervision when 
                                              examiners identify concerns that warrant monitoring.  Often 
                                                the Watch List serves to curtail problems and, as a result, 
                                                  supervisory actions are minimized. 
                     Special Supervision             
                                                      The next level of supervision is special supervision, which 
                                                       is an early intervention strategy when the board of 
                                                         directors and management of an institution 
                                                            demonstrate willingness and ability to resolve 
                    Normal Supervision                       negative conditions.  Special supervision is aimed 
                                                              at efficiencies by prompting boards and 
                                                                management to effect meaningful change 
                                                                  before enforcement becomes necessary.  
                                                                   With special supervision, FCA increases 
monitoring through the development of institution‐specific supervisory strategies documented in a 
supervisory letter.  Although FCA can use statutory enforcement actions, OE utilizes special supervision 
as an additional approach to get the desired improvement without formal enforcement. 
 
If an institution has severe financial, asset quality, management, or governance weaknesses, FCA may 
utilize the highest level of supervision, enforcement.  This level of supervision can include a variety of 
formal actions.  Specifically, the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended, promulgated the enforcement 
powers including: cease and desist orders, suspension and/or removal of directors and officers, and civil 
money penalties.  When faced with the potential of a formal enforcement action, most often, an 
institution agrees to enter into a written agreement with the FCA to address and correct weaknesses to 
avoid the formal cease and desist process or other actions.  The written agreement identifies specific 
articles detailing actions to induce corrective measures by the institution’s board and management.  
There are also instances when an institution may begin in special supervision and FCA elevates the 
supervision level to a formal enforcement action.  FCA may also elect to have both supervisory letter(s) 
and enforcement actions working simultaneously.  
   
                                          Conditions Warranting Actions 
 
OE Directives state that, as a general practice, special supervision is appropriate for any institution with 
a 3 or above in composite or component ratings.  Special supervision may also be warranted in cases 
where the institution receives a 2 rating if conditions are deteriorating or if a specific issue needs 
attention.  If an institution receives a composite rating of 4 or 5, a referral must be made to the 
Regulatory Enforcement Committee (REC) for consideration of action.  The REC is a group of designated 
individuals that considers, votes, and recommends the use of enforcement actions to the FCA Board and 
consults on other actions, as needed.   



                                                        2
 
The FCA Board designated the Chief Operating Officer as the REC Chair.  Other REC members include 
Office Directors of OE, Office of General Counsel, and Office of Regulatory Policy.  A representative from 
the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation is also invited to participate in REC activities as a non‐
voting member.  The REC recommends actions to the FCA Board, which in turn, votes on whether to 
initiate actions.  The following shows instances in which a referral to the REC must be made according to 
FCA’s Board Policy Statement 79: 

      The institution or person is         The institution or person is 
    deemed unable or unwilling to         about to engage in a material 
    address a material:  (a)  unsafe     unsafe or unsound practice or is     Conditions meet the statutory 
       or unsound condition or             about to commit a willful or        criteria for a suspension or 
      practice; or (b) violation or        material violation of law or                  removal.
      ongoing violation of law or          regulation that exposes the 
              regulation.                 institution to significant risk.


     Conditions meet the statutory 
       criteria for assessing a civil                                         An institution or person fails to 
                                          Conditions meet the statutory 
     money penalty and the factors                                             comply with an Enforcement 
                                              criteria to place an FCS 
    to be considered in determining                                             Document or is unwilling or 
                                         institution in conservatorship or 
      the amount of a civil money                                             unable to address a violation of 
                                                    receivership.
    penalty justify the imposition of                                         a condition imposed in writing.
               the penalty.




                                         Conditions justify termination or 
                                           modification of an existing 
                                            Enforcement Document.



 
Prior	OIG	Reviews	
 
The OIG conducted an inspection, Farm Credit Administration’s Enforcement Program (I‐06‐01), to 
assess the readiness of the FCA to take enforcement actions.  The inspection results were: 
 
     readiness and training needed improvement  
     the FCA Board’s involvement in the enforcement process needed to be established in policy 
        guidance and thresholds 
     
The OIG made six recommendations to improve enforcement action readiness.  The actions were taken. 
 
The OIG also conducted an audit, FCA’s Use of Enforcement Actions (A‐97‐03), to evaluate FCA’s use of 
enforcement actions in obtaining corrective actions in FCS institutions and to document and evaluate 
FCA’s organizational structure and process as it pertained to achieving enforcement objectives.  The 
findings were the enforcement actions had generally been effective, but opportunities existed to 
enhance timeliness and efficiency of enforcement actions.  The OIG made three recommendations to 
improve the enforcement process, and the actions were taken. 



                                                        3
 
AUDIT RESULTS
      
     The objective of this audit was to determine whether the FCA is following the special supervision and 
     enforcement processes and monitoring institution compliance effectively.  Overall, the FCA is generally 
     following the processes and monitoring compliance.  We found preliminary decisions, formal decisions 
     made through the Regulatory Enforcement Committee, and recommendations to the FCA Board are 
     clearly documented.  Justification to initiate the enforcement and special supervision actions are in 
     Reports of Examination, memoranda, and communications with the institutions.  FCA documents the 
     special supervision and enforcement processes through FCA Board policies, policies and directives, 
     sections of the Examination Manual, and RSD procedures as noted below:     
      
                       FCA Board Policies                                       Policies and Directives
       •Policy Statement 34‐Disclosure of the Issuance and         •Policies and Procedures Manual 504‐Enforcement 
        Termination of Enforcement Documents                        Actions
       •Policy Statement 53‐Examination Philiosophy                •OE Directive 35‐Special Supervision
       •Policy Statement 79‐Consideration and Referral of          •OE Directive 36‐Enforcement Action
        Supervisory Strategies and Enforcement Actions




                      Examination Manual                                           RSD Procedures
       •Section 1.4 Supervision and Enforcement                    •Enforcement Actions
       •Section 1.5 FCA Criminal Referral Form and                 •Civil Money Penalties
        Instructions                                               •Supervisory Filing System
                                                                   •Supervision‐Related Reporting
                                                                   •Supervisory Document Processing



                                                                                                                       
      
     During the audit, we found: 
      
          the Watch List is effective;  
          identification and escalation of concerns were appropriate; 
          complexity and length of actions are correlated; and, 
          persistent involvement and communication leads to corrective action.   
      
     We also identified a few opportunities to improve or modify the processes through: 
      
          increasing staff readiness;  
          ensuring institutions adhere to the criminal referral process requirements; and, 
          expanding or changing directives and/or processes. 
      
      
      



                                                              4 
Watch	List	Effectiveness	
 
The Watch List is effective.  Within the three levels of supervision, OE uses various forms of review to 
monitor the FCS.  One of those mechanisms is the OE Watch List, which tracks emerging issues within 
the System.  If a concern arises with an institution, the examination division coordinates with RSD to 
place the institution on the Watch List.  We reviewed OE’s monthly Watch List to determine 
effectiveness.  We analyzed the reasons why institutions were placed on the list, how long they 
remained, and whether the institutions were subsequently moved to special supervision or 
enforcement.   
 
While there are other factors to consider, utilizing the Watch List allows OE to heighten awareness while 
reviewing and gathering information on potential concerns and emerging threats.  It also increases 
efficiency by curtailing the need for supervisory or enforcement actions and providing ongoing 
coordination and communication between examination divisions and RSD.   
 
In one case, an institution notified OE of potentially fraudulent transactions at the institution.  The 
institution uncovered suspicious activity, but officials were unsure about the depth and impact of the 
activities.  OE immediately placed the institution on the Watch List while the institution and the Agency 
gathered important information.  This allowed FCA to discover the extent of the issues and determine a 
productive path for correcting issues identified.  The institution was on the Watch List for two months 
before OE increased the level of supervision.  
 
Another example of how the Watch List creates efficiency involved an allegation received, regarding a 
potential improper sale of property to an association employee’s relative.  OE placed the association on 
the Watch List and conducted onsite work, which included an investigation into the accuracy of the 
allegation.  Subsequently, the examiners concluded there was no violation.  However, the Watch List 
allowed OE to track the emerging issue and potential concern without initiating further action.   
 
Developing supervisory actions takes time, precise directions, and the involvement of many staff.  Only 
one of the eleven institutions reviewed moved from the Watch List, out of normal supervision into 
special supervision.  In addition, institutions tend to be on the Watch List for a short amount of time.  
Nine of the eleven institutions reviewed were on the Watch List for ten months or less.  While these 
institutions required heightened awareness, most issues were resolved without the need for intensive 
special supervision and enforcement actions. 
 
The Watch List also increases communication.  The examination division and RSD coordinate at least 
once a month.  This communication allows RSD to prepare for future, emerging issues and to be 
involved from the beginning in instances of potential unsafe and unsound practices or weaknesses.  
	
Identification	and	Escalation	of	Concerns		
                                                       
From the 11 institutions under special supervision and enforcement actions we reviewed, concerns were 
identified early and increased supervisory measures occurred when needed.  We also found the majority 
of the institutions under special supervision and enforcement actions had management and asset 
quality concerns.  We selected institutions that had special supervision or enforcement actions in 
process or terminated throughout Fiscal Year (FY) 2014.  In total, there were eight institutions under 
enforcement and three under special supervision that met this criteria. 



                                                    5
 
For each institution, we reviewed the agreements and/or letters documenting the actions and the 
memoranda documenting the reasons for the actions.  We also reviewed the historical FIRS ratings and 
examination reports for the institutions and each action, including both special supervision and 
enforcement, initiated and terminated on the institution.  During this audit, we identified the following: 
 
    	 Concerns were identified early.  In reviewing the FIRS ratings, 9 of the 11 institutions had a 
        composite rating of 3 when the first action was taken and the remaining two institutions were 
        rated a 2.  No institution’s rating had lowered to a 4 or 5 before supervisory initiation.    
         
    	 Increased supervisory measures occurred when needed.  Of the eight institutions under 
        enforcement, six had previously been under special supervision status.  When conditions 
        deteriorated or concerns were not addressed properly, OE moved the institutions to formal 
        enforcement status. 
 
    	 The majority of the institutions under special supervision and enforcement actions had 
        management and asset quality concerns1.  Specifically, 10 of the 11 institutions had 
        management issues and 9 of the 11 had asset quality concerns that were specifically identified 
        as factors needing FCA action.  Other themes of concern were earnings, standards of conduct, 
        and credit administration, as noted below:   
         
            



 

               Institutions under Special Supervision and Enforcement Actions 


                                                Number of Institutions with the Areas of Concern 

                                                                                 Standards          Credit 
    Action Categories      Management  Asset Quality             Earnings 
                                                                                 of Conduct      Administration 

    Special Supervision 
                                 6                 5                 2                 1                 1 
     and Enforcement 


    Enforcement Only             2                 1                 0                 1                 1 


    Special Supervision 
                                 2                 3                 2                 0                 1 
            Only 

	
 


                                                            
1
  The list identifies major themes of issues affecting the institutions.  This list is not all‐inclusive of every 
issue found at the institutions.   
 



                                                        6
 
Complexity	Correlates	with	the	Length	of	Time	Under	Special	Supervision	and	
Enforcement	Actions	
 
In reviewing special supervision and enforcement actions, we found that complexity of the underlying 
issues played a pivotal role in the amount of time an institution is under enforcement.  Many of the 
institutions under enforcement action, with problems needing correction, received multiple supervisory 
letters and multiple iterations of written agreements.  For example, one institution received five 
different supervisory letters and had a written agreement with FCA.  Another institution received three 
supervisory letters and two different iterations of written agreements, with the second agreement 
focusing more on management of the institution.  
 
Complex agreements involve more time and staff allocations.  The following chart shows eight 
institutions (within this audit scope) under written agreements and the length of time these institutions 
were under action, with three currently ongoing: 
 
 
                            Institutions under Written Agreements 
                  Institution     Length of  Number of  Number of              Total 
                                 Time Under  Supervisory    Written           Actions 
                                   Written     Letters    Agreements 
                                 Agreement* 
                       1          60 months            3            2             5 

                       2          23 months            1            1             2 

                       3          19 months            2            1             3 

                       4          27 months            3            1             4 

                       5          50 months            1            2             3 

                       6          34 months            1            1             2 

                       7          53 months            1            2             3 

                       8          46 months            5            1             6 
                * Calculations were as of January 2015. 
                  
These institutions ranged from one and a half to five years under enforcement with an average of 39 
months.  Three of the institutions remained in enforcement status for over four years; however, each of 
those institutions had at least two written agreements and one supervisory letter.  Six of the eight 
institutions had three or more actions.     
 
This average can be used internally in evaluating future resource needs.  FCA can also use this average 
externally when communicating with institutions on typical lengths of time an institution may take to 
recover from downturns or operating in an unsafe and unsound manner.  The chart also shows the work 
completed in 2014.  FCA terminated agreements with two of the three institutions exceeding the four‐
year period and three additional agreements during 2014.    



                                                      7
 
Length of time under an agreement is also important because it is a performance measure for the 
Agency.  The measure is tied to the percentage of requirements in supervisory agreements with which 
FCS institutions have at least substantially complied within 18 months of execution of the agreements: 
 
 
    Performance Measure                                           FY 2014  FY 2014  FY 2015‐2016 
                                                                  Target      Result      Target 
    Percentage of requirements in supervisory agreements          > 80%       91%         > 80%  
    with which FCS institutions have at least substantially 
    complied within 18 months of execution of the agreements. 
     
   
	
Persistent	Involvement	and	Communication	with	Institutions		
 
OE worked persistently to address institutions’ issues and design strategies to correct problems and 
conditions.  As an example, FCA identified significant problems at one institution.  The Agency and 
institution entered into a written agreement.  About seven months later, FCA issued a supervisory letter 
due to the institution’s partial noncompliance with the written agreement and continued deterioration.  
Another written agreement was entered into about nine months later.  FCA terminated the agreement, 
with the institution now operating under normal supervision. 
 
                                             Nine Months Later‐
    First Written                            Second Written 
    Agreement                                Agreement                                    Current 
    •FIRS Ratings:                           •FIRS Ratings:                               •FIRS Ratings:  
     3/3/3/4/3/3/1                            4/4/4/4/4/4/3                                2/2/3/2/2/2/2



                       Seven Months Later‐                        Two Years and Ten 
                       Supervisory Letter	                        Months Later‐Written 
                       •FIRS Ratings:                             Agreement 
                        4/4/4/4/4/4/3                             Terminated
                                                                  •FIRS Ratings 
                                                                   2/2/3/2/2/2/2                              
 
The consistent and firm approach coupled with monitoring guided this institution back to compliance.  
Although the FIRS ratings show improvement was not immediate, the institution showed a positive 
trend.  Based on our review, this is a consistent result of persistence and communication.   
 
                                      Year            FIRS Ratings

                                         Year 1            3/3/3/4/3/3/2
                                         Year 2            4/4/4/4/4/4/3
                                         Year 3            3/3/3/3/3/3/2
                                         Year 4            3/3/3/3/2/2/2
                                         Year 5            2/2/3/2/2/2/2
                                         Year 6            2/2/3/2/2/2/2




                                                           8
 
Further, of the 11 institutions reviewed, seven had current composite FIRS Ratings that improved from 
the composite rating at the time of the first action.  One institution began with a 2 rating, declined to a 
3, but returned to a 2 with corrective action.   
 
 
                                         Composite FIRS Ratings for Institutions under Special 
                                                   Supervision and Enforcement  
                                        Composite FIRS       Composite FIRS          Current 
                                       Rating at time of     Rating at time of    Composite FIRS 
                                      Special Supervision     Enforcement            Rating 

                                               3                     4                  3

                                             N/A                     3                  2

                                               2                     3                  3

                                               3                     3                  2

                                             N/A                     3                  2

                                               3                     3                  2

                                               2                     3                  2

                                               3                     3                  3

                                               3                   N/A                  2

                                               3                   N/A                  2

                                               3                   N/A                  2

                                   
 
OIG regularly conducts a survey of FCS institutions regarding the quality and consistency of the Agency’s 
examination function and the examiners performing the main mission functions.  This survey collects 
and publishes the results without attribution.  In a recent OIG survey of FCS institutions, one response 
answered affirmatively that the institution was recently released from a written agreement.  The 
institution comments were, “FCA staff were very considerate and friendly, but firm.”  The response 
further stated that the institution “appreciates their assistance and acknowledges their contribution to 
our present level of expertise.”   
 
Improvements	to	the	Special	Supervision	and	Enforcement	Processes	
 
The audit also revealed improvements or modifications could also be made to the special supervision 
and enforcement processes.  Areas that could be improved include: 
 


                                                                    9
 
             staff readiness, 
             the criminal referral process, and 
             special supervision and enforcement directives and processes. 
               
Staff	Readiness	
 
Given the ever‐changing FCS environment, staff readiness for special supervision and enforcement 
actions could be improved.  The special supervision and enforcement environment has changed over the 
last two years.  The number of enforcement and special supervision matters has declined.  In 2014, FCA 
terminated 10 actions2.  In 2013, FCA terminated four supervisory letters; two of those resulting in 
increased supervision by undertaking enforcement action.  The initiation of formal enforcement actions 
(written agreements), has also trended downward since 2012, with no new written agreements in 2014, 
as shown below:  
                                                     

                                                  Initiated Enforcement Actions
                5
                4
                3
                2
                1
                0
                               2009                    2010            2011          2012          2013   2014

                                                               Number of Initiated Enforcement Actions
                                                                                                       
 
 
RSD currently has five assigned staff with two staff members also performing additional duties outside 
of RSD.  Three of the five assigned members of RSD are retirement eligible or near retirement eligible.  
While the enforcement and supervision processes are well documented, OE currently does not have a 
dedicated training program for enforcement examiners.  Based on interviews with RSD staff, additional 
expertise in RSD work is acquired from experienced enforcement examiners and on‐the‐job training.  
Because of this, it is essential that RSD and OE capture the knowledge of those experienced examiners.   
 
There are also ongoing discussions about how to best utilize RSD examiners during times of decreased 
special supervision and enforcement activity.  It is not possible to predict needs or changes in the 
condition of an institution, which may warrant the need for supervisory attention.  By documenting a 
training program that could be utilized by all examiners, there can be multiple options for RSD.  For 
example, with a proper training program, an examiner could become more familiar with supervisory 
actions and have the ability to serve in RSD on an as needed basis.  OE officials stated that, if needed, 
there are a number of staff within OE who have knowledge from their past experiences with special 

                                                            
2
  These actions included: one supervisory conditions of merger, five written agreements, and four supervisory 
letters. 



                                                                              10
 
supervision and enforcement processes who could assist as enforcement examiners with minimal 
additional training under RSD’s oversight.   
 
A recent case within RSD shows the significance and importance of RSD readiness.  A large potentially 
fraudulent scheme was uncovered at an FCS institution.  Because of the significance of the issues and 
concerns, it is and will continue to be a large undertaking for RSD and other parts of OE.  Because 
current staff are knowledgeable and have experience in this area, they were able to react quickly and 
efficiently.  For the future, it is imperative that OE direct attention to developing a training program so 
that examiners understand special supervision and enforcement processes and actions and are able to 
react quickly if needed.   
 
Agreed‐Upon	Action	1	
 
In order to improve the future readiness of RSD, OE agreed to: 
 
     1.	 Develop a training program for special supervision and enforcement actions to ensure the
 
         organization has the knowledge to react to the changing FCS environment.
 
 
Criminal	Referrals	
 
At times, FCA can and does initiate special supervision and/or 
enforcement actions based on potential violations of laws, regulations, or           FCA Regulation § 612.2301
                                                                                               Referrals
rules.  This may include actions taken by certain individuals that involve           Within 30 calendar days of
suspected fraudulent activities affecting the institutions.  As part of the      determining that there is a known
audit, three institutions under special supervision or enforcement where          or suspected criminal violation of
potential criminal activity had taken place were judgmentally selected to  the       United States Code involving or
                                                                                  affecting its assets, operations, or
ensure the criminal referral process was followed.  FCA regulations require  affairs, the institution shall refer
institutions to file a criminal referral form for known or suspected criminal       such criminal violation to the
violations.                                                                      appropriate regional offices of the
                                                                                   United States Attorney, and the
                                                                                 Federal Bureau of Investigation or
Two of the three institutions reviewed had not filed criminal referrals.         the United States Secret Service or
Institutions are required to complete the FCA Referral Form within 30               both, using the FCA Referral
                                                                                                 Form. 
calendar days of determining that a known or suspected criminal violation 
has occurred.  A copy of the referral form must be provided at the same 
time to FCA’s Office of General Counsel.  For the first institution reviewed, 
we found RSD initiated timely actions that included specific instructions to one institution about filing 
the criminal referral.  In fact, RSD responded to the institution with the instruction only six days after the 
institution notified FCA of an alleged fraudulent activity.  Subsequently, the institution filed two 
separate criminal referral forms, as required.   
 
In the other two cases reviewed, we found that the institutions did not submit a criminal referral.  One 
case involved misconduct and numerous instances of standards of conduct violations by a director.  FCA 
initiated enforcement actions against the director; however, a criminal referral was not filed.  
 
In the last case reviewed, FCA directed an institution to have an independent third‐party investigation of 
a large charge off.  FCA directed the institution to identify any known or suspected criminal activities and 
complete the criminal referral if these activities were identified.  The investigative report concluded 
there was no evidence of funds diversion or collateral conversion.  However, the report noted other 


                                                        11
 
items such as a misrepresentation by the borrowers, comingling of assets and liabilities, a lack of audited 
financial statements, and appraisals with serious deficiencies.  Despite these findings, the institution did 
not file a criminal referral.   
 
The FCA Criminal Referral Regulation 612, Subpart B, is written to require any known or suspected 
criminal activity to be reported.  This regulation is a clear mandate to report to the appropriate law 
enforcement agency.  In both cases where the criminal referrals were not filed, the institutions hired 
private firms to investigate and report back to the institutions.  However, both firms were limited in the 
reviews.  For example, in both investigations, the prime individuals involved in the activities were not 
interviewed and financial records reviewed were limited.  While these investigations are important to 
the institutions, they are not a substitute for an independent law enforcement inquiry.  Criminal 
referrals are especially important when an institution is under special supervision and/or enforcement 
actions.  Because criminal activities can impact the safety and soundness of the institution, the 
institutions should be cognizant of, and closely adhere to, all requirements relating to the criminal 
referral activities.  Further, FCA should ensure once the enforcement decisions are made and actions 
taken, the institutions are still also mindful of the obligation to report “suspected” criminal activity. 
 
FCA has placed the criminal activity referrals and related internal controls on the Spring 2015 Regulatory 
Projects Plan.  Specifically, the purpose is to consider whether the current regulatory guidance regarding 
internal controls to prevent, identify, and monitor fraud and criminal activity needs revision.  The plan 
also states they will review the processes for referring known or suspected criminal violations. 
	
Agreed‐Upon	Action	2	
 
In order to improve the criminal referral process, OE agreed to: 
 
    2.	 Emphasize the requirement of FCA Regulation 612, Subpart B, and provide training and/or 
        education to examiners on the role and responsibility FCA has regarding the criminal referral 
        form and to ensure institutions are filing the form as required.  
         
Special	Supervision	and	Enforcement	Directives	and	Processes	
 
As noted in this report, OE has thorough policies, procedures, and directives to document the special 
supervision and enforcement processes.  These documents set forth specific, detailed directions for 
examiners to follow.  We identified two areas where directives did not reflect current practices and 
could be improved as noted below: 
 
    	 According to OE Directive 36, Enforcement Action Procedures, the examination division is 
        responsible for evaluating compliance with the enforcement action and assigning a preliminary 
        compliance rating.  Then, an RSD enforcement examiner reviews the compliance evaluations 
        and assigns a final rating, which is communicated to the institution.  We found three instances 
        where an enforcement examiner completed an informal compliance rating analysis, which 
        included some proposed changes to the compliance ratings.  This is an action not addressed in 
        the directive.  OE officials indicated the documents were not meant to result in a 
        communication to the institution to formally change the ratings.  Instead, the process was to 
        document internal analyses to assess the institution’s compliance before considering additional 
        Agency action, such as termination of an enforcement action.  Although the examiners 
        annotated the ratings as “informal” or as “part of workpapers,” the existence of these ratings in 


                                                     12
 
       OE’s records may create confusion as to the intent of the informal ratings or compliance with OE 
       Directive 36.   
        
    	 OE Directive 35, Special Supervision Procedures, sets forth procedures for initiating, monitoring, 
       terminating, and administering special supervision.  In three instances, OE issued supervisory 
       letters but each institution remained under “normal supervision.”  OE also identified the 
       communication as a “supervisory letter” and reported the items to the Board as “other 
       supervisory actions.”  We understand OE has a variety of tools for communicating with and 
       monitoring institutions.  However, using the letters for both normal supervision and special 
       supervision may be confusing. 
 
OE procedures do not address how informal ratings are to be used, when they are appropriate, or how 
they will be relied upon.  The procedures thoroughly discuss the supervisory letter process for special 
supervision status.  However, the procedures do not address initiating a supervisory letter when the 
supervision level does not change but remains normal.   
 
Agreed‐Upon	Action	3	
 
In order to improve the processes, OE agreed to: 
 
    3.	 Address the use of informal ratings and other supervisory letters by either expanding or 
        changing current directives and/or processes to include when they are appropriate and how 
        they will be used.      
	
 




                                                   13
 
OBJECTIVE, SCOPE, AND METHODOLOGY
      
     The objective of this audit was to determine whether FCA is following the special supervision and 
     enforcement processes and monitoring institution compliance effectively.  We conducted fieldwork at 
     FCA’s Headquarters in McLean, VA from November 2014 through February 2015.  We limited our scope 
     to actions initiated or in process in FY 2014. 
      
     The following steps were taken to accomplish the objective: 
      
               Reviewed the Farm Credit Act, as amended, for mandates on special supervision and 
                enforcement actions.  
                 
               Reviewed FCA, OE, and RSD policies and procedures related to special supervision and 
                enforcement actions. 
                 
               Obtained background information for special supervision and enforcement actions. 
                 
               Interviewed OE management and selected examiners on internal policies and procedures. 
                 
               Reviewed documentation from the Enterprise Documentation and Guidance system and the 
                Enforcement and Supervision databases.   
                 
               Reviewed special supervision and enforcement actions initiated or in process during FY 2014, 
                and determined why FCA placed the institution under special supervision or enforcement.   
                 
               Analyzed historical information in the Supervisory History Database maintained by OE for 
                actions taken since 2007. 
                 
               Analyzed actions for potentially fraudulent activities and reviewed files for criminal referral 
                forms.  We judgmentally sampled three activities based on the reasons behind certain actions 
                and activities conducted by the institution.  Because our sample was judgmental and not 
                statistically sampled, we cannot project our findings to the entire population.   
                 
               Reviewed compliance ratings for institutions under enforcement actions.   
                 
               Reviewed and analyzed the watch list for identification, length of time on the list, and escalation 
                to special supervision or enforcement.   
          
         This audit was performed in accordance with the Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards.  
         Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence 
         to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective.  We 
         assessed internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations to the extent necessary to satisfy 
         the objective.  Because our review was limited, it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal 
         control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit.  We assessed the computer‐
         processed data relevant to our audit objective and determined that the data was sufficiently reliable.  
         Overall, we believe the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our conclusions based on our 
         audit objective.                                  



                                                            14 
ACRONYMS
     

           CAMELS      Capital, Assets, Management, Earnings, Liquidity, and Sensitivity 

           FCA         Farm Credit Administration 

           FCS         Farm Credit System 

           FIRS        Financial Institution Rating System 

           FY          Fiscal Year 

           OE          Office of Examination  

           OIG         Office of Inspector General 

           REC         Regulatory Enforcement Committee 

           RSD         Risk Supervision Division 

            

                                




                                                    15 
           R E P O R T  
                                  

    Fraud    |    Waste    |    Abuse    |    Mismanagement 
 




                                                 
                                  


            FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION
 
            OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL
 
                                  




         Phone:  Toll Free (800) 437‐7322; (703) 883‐4316
 
                                        
                        Fax:  (703) 883‐4059
 
                                        
                  E‐mail:  fca‐ig‐hotline@rcn.com 
                                        
                Mail:  Farm Credit Administration
 
                    Office of Inspector General
 
                       1501 Farm Credit Drive
 
                      McLean, VA  22102‐5090