oversight

Information on Federally Owned Submarginal Land Within the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota

Published by the Government Accountability Office on 1971-10-27.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

                                                       . . .: .: . .s kept



jX    ~REPORT
       D       TO COMMITTEE      i; j
     z ON INTERIOR AND INSULAR AFFAIRS
       UNITED STATES SENATE



       Information On Federally Owned
       Submarginal Land Within
       The White Earth Reservation
       In Minnesota Proposed To Be Held
       In Trust For
       The Minnesota Chippewa Tribe        8-147652,   B - 147655



       Bureau of Indian Affairs
       Department of the Interior




        BY THE COMPTROLLER GENERAL
        OF THE UNI TED STATES


                        /           -0IOCT. 27,1971
              COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES
                           WASHINGTON. D.C. 20548




  B-147652
  B-147655

  Dear Mr. Chairman:

         In accordance with your request of April 1, 1971, this
  is our report containing information on federally owned sub-
  marginal land on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota
  proposed to be held in trust for the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe.
  Our comments on S.1217, which would convey beneficial inter-
  est in this land to the Indians, have been furnished separately.

         The information in this report updates information con-
  tained in our 1962 report on the review of proposed legislation
  for conveyance to certain Indian tribes and groups of submar-
  ginal land administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, De-
  partment of the Interior (B-147652, B-147655, August 13, 1962).

         A report updating information on land proposed to be
  held in trust for the Stockbridge Munsee Indian Community
  in Wisconsin is also being furnished separately. Updated in-
  formation on the other tribes mentioned in the 1962 report will
  be furnished later.

        We plan to make no further distribution of this report
 unless specifically requested, and then we shall make distri-
 bution only after your agreement has been obtained or public
 announcement has been made by you concerning the contents
 of the report.

                                         Sincerely yours,




                                         Comptroller General
                                         of the United States

  The Honorable Henry M. Jackson, Chairman
  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs
0 United   States Senate




                  50TH ANNIVERSARY 1921-1971
COMPTROLLER GENERAL'S REPORT TO           INFORMATION ON FEDERALLY OWNED
THE COMMITTEE ON INTERIOR AND             SUBMARGINAL LAND WITHIN THE WHITE
INSULAR AFFAIRS, UNITED STATES            EARTH RESERVATION IN MINNESOTA
SENATE                                    PROPOSED TO BE HELD IN TRUST FOR
                                          THE MINNESOTA CHIPPEWA TRIBE
                                          Bureau of Indian Affairs
                                          Department of the Interior
                                          B-147652, B-147655

DIGEST


WHY THE REVIEW WAS MADE

     The Chairman of the Senate Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, in
     a letter dated April 1, 1971, requested the General Accounting Office
     (GAO) to provide the Committee an updated version of GAO's 1962 report on
     the review of proposed legislation for conveyance to certain Indian tribes
     and groups of submarginal land administered by the Bureau of Indian Af-
     fairs, Department of the Interior (B-147652, B-147655, August 13, 1962).
     The Chairman also requested GAO to examine into how conveyance of the
     lands in question can contribute to the social and economic development
     of the Indian groups involved.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

     Under proposed legislation beneficial interest in 28,555 acres of sub-
     marginal land on the White Earth Reservation in Mahnomen and Becker Coun-
     ties, Minnesota, would be conveyed to the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe with
     title to be held in trust by the United States Government. GAO estimates
     that the land, for which the Government paid about $175,000, has a market
     value of $1.6 million. (See p. 6.)

     There are some improvements, such as houses and farm buildings, on the
     land; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which administers the land, is
     developing some of the land for lakeshore homesites. (See p. 7.) But
     most of the land is timberland. From 1966 through June 30, 1971, the Bu-
     reau received about $121,500 in revenues from timber cutting and other
     land-use activities. If beneficial interest in the land is conveyed to
     the tribe, such revenues would accrue to the tribe, less up to 10 percent
     the Bureau would charge to cover its administrative costs. (See pp. 8,
     11, and 14.)
     From 1966 through June 30, 1971, the tribe received about $8,000 from sub-
     permits it issued for lakeshore homesites on land for which it holds a
     revocable permit from the Bureau. (See pp. 8 and 14.) The tribe has also
     made some efforts to develop the recreational and agricultural potential
     of reservation land but these efforts have been largely unsuccessful be-
     cause of a lack of financing, community interest, or necessary facilities.
     In 1971, however, two manufacturing plants began operations on

     Tear Sheet                                      OCT. 27, 1 9 7 1
reservation land and, although one had closed by the time of our review,
the other was providing employment to Indians. (See p. 10.)
Bureau and tribal officials told GAO that plans for using the submarginal
land had not been developed and pursued because the revocable permits,
which had to be obtained from the Bureau, created uncertainties. They
said that, if the land is conveyed to the tribe, harvesting of timber
would continue and recreational and agricultural development was likely.
(See p. 11.)
GAO believes that, if beneficial interest in the submarginal land is con-
veyed to the tribe, the net revenues which would accrue to the tribe, to-
gether with those it already receives through subpermits, could help
tribe members advance their social and economic standing, provided the
revenues are invested in planning, establishing, and operating enterprises
which would employ Indians and have reasonable chances of success. (See
p. 14.)




Tear Sheet
                                    2
                         Contents
                                                         Page

DIGEST                                                     1

CHAPTER

   1       INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE                          3
               White Earth Reservation                     3

   2       INFORMATION ON SUBMARGINAL.AND TRIBAL LANDS     6
               Location of submarginal land                6
               Improvements on submarginal land            6
               Land use                                    8
                   Present use of submarginal land         8
                   Efforts to use reservation land        10
                   Potential use of submarginal land      11
                   Housing and related improvements       11
                   Water resources                        12
                   Mineral value                          12
               Tribal financial resources                 13
               Income from submarginal land               13
               Conclusion                                 14

APPENDIX

      I    Letter dated April 1, 1971, from the
             Chairman, Committee on Interior and
             Insular Affairs, United States Senate        16

                         ABBREVIATION

GAO        General Accounting Office
COMPTROLLER GENERAL'S REPORT TO           INFORMATION ON FEDERALLY OWNED
THE COMMITTEE ON INTERIOR AND             SUBMARGINAL LAND WITHIN THE WHITE
INSULAR AFFAIRS, UNITED STATES            EARTH RESERVATION IN MINNESOTA
SENATE                                    PROPOSED TO BE HELD IN TRUST FOR
                                          THE MINNESOTA CHIPPEWA TRIBE
                                          Bureau of Indian Affairs
                                          Department of the Interior
                                          B-147652, B-147655

DIGEST

WHY THE REVIEW WAS MADE

     The Chairman of the Senate Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, in
     a letter dated April 1, 1971, requested the General Accounting Office
     (GAO) to provide the Committee an updated version of GAO's 1962 report on
     the review of proposed legislation for conveyance to certain Indian tribes
     and groups of submarginal land administered by the Bureau of Indian Af-
     fairs, Department of the Interior (B-147652, B-147655, August 13, 1962).
     The Chairman also requested GAO to examine into how conveyance of the
     lands in question can contribute to the social and economic development
     of the Indian groups involved.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

     Under proposed legislation beneficial interest in 28,555 acres of sub-
     marginal land on the White Earth Reservation in Mahnomen and Becker Coun-
     ties, Minnesota, would be conveyed to the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe with
     title to be held in trust by the United States Government. GAO estimates
     that the land, for which the Government paid about $175,000, has a market
     value of $1.6 million. (See p. 6.)
     There are some improvements, such as houses and farm buildings, on the
     land; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which administers the land, is
     developing some of the land for lakeshore homesites. (See p. 7.) But
     most of the land is timberland. From 1966 through June 30, 1971, the Bu-
     reau received-about $121,500 in revenues from timber cutting and other
     land-use activities. If beneficial interest in the land is conveyed to
     the tribe, such revenues would accrue to the tribe, less up to 10 percent
     the Bureau would charge to cover its administrative costs. (See pp. 8,
     11, and 14.)
     From 1966 through June 30(, 1971, the tribe received about $8,000 from sub-
     permits it issued for lakeshore homesites on land for which it holds a
     revocable permit from the Bureau. (See pp. 8 and 14.) The tribe has also
     made some efforts to develop the recreational and agricultural potential
     of reservation land but these efforts have been largely unsuccessful be-
     cause of a lack of financing, community interest, or necessary facilities.
     In 1971, however, two manufacturing plants began operations on
reservation land and, although one had closed by the time of our review,
the other was providing employment to Indians. ;(See p. 10.)
Bureau and tribal officials told GAO that plans for using the submarginal
land had not been developed and pursued because the revocable permits,
which had to be obtained from the Bureau, created uncertainties. They
said that, if the land is conveyed to the tribe, harvesting of timber
would continue and recreational and agricultural development was likely.
(See p. 11.)
GAO believes that, if beneficial interest in the submarginal land is con-
veyed to the tribe, the net revenues which would accrue to the tribe, to-
gether with those it already receives through subpermits, could help
tribe members advance their social and economic standing, provided the
revenues are invested in planning, establishing, and operating enterprises
which would employ Indians and have reasonable chances of success. (See
p. 14.)
                          CHAPTER 1

                  INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

     Pursuant to a request dated April 1, 1971, from the
Chairman of the Senate Committee on Interior and Insular
Affairs (see app. I), we have obtained information on lands
comprising the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota to up-
date certain factual data on such land contained in our Au-
gust 1962 report on submarginal land administered by the
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.1 That
report was submitted to the House and Senate Committees on
Interior and Insular Affairs.

     The Chairman's request was made in connection with a
bill which would convey beneficial interest in submarginal
lands within the White Earth Reservation to the Minnesota
Chippewa Tribe with title to be held in trust by the United
States Government.

      To obtain the information, we reviewed pertinent rec-
ords and interviewed officials at the White Earth Reserva-
tion and at the Bureau's headquarters office in Washington,
D.C.; its Area Office in Minneapolis, Minnesota; and its
Minnesota Agency Office in Bemidji, Minnesota. We inter-
viewed the Agriculture Department's District Conservationist
and the Mahnomen County (Minnesota) Executive Director, Ag-
ricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service, to obtain
their views on certain matters within their areas of exper-
tise.

WHITE EARTH RESERVATION

     The White Earth Reservation is located in northwestern
Minnesota and covers all of Mahnomen County and parts of the
adjoining Becker and Clearwater Counties. The reservation


1Reporton Review of Proposed Legislation for Conveyance to
Certain Indian Tribes and Groups of Submarginal Land Ad-
ministered by Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the
Interior (B-147652, B-147655, August 13, 1962).


                              3
is one of six member reservations of the Minnesota Chippewa
Tribe. The other reservations are Grand Portage, Fond du
Lac, Leech Lake, Mille Lacs, and Nett Lake.

     The Minnesota Chippewa Tribe was organized to manage
tribal lands, to promote the general welfare of the members,
and to represent members concerning rights and privileges
afforded under Federal statutes. The tribe operates under
a constitution ratified by a vote of its members in Novem-
ber 1963 and approved by the Secretary of the Interior in
March 1964.

     There were about 18,000 White Earth members of the
tribe as of April 1971, most of whom resided away from the
reservation. The 1971 "Report of Labor Force" prepared by
the Bureau showed that, in 1967, about 2,300 Indians lived
within the reservation boundaries and about 300 lived near
the reservation.

     The White Earth Reservation, established in 1867 by
treaty with the United States Government, is an "open reser-
vation" in the sense that it is open to settlement by both
Indians and non-Indians. Originally the tribe held 709,000
acres of the estimated 737,000 acres of land within the res-
ervation boundaries. Most of the land has passed from In-
dian ownership. Much of it was sold to lumber companies af-
ter the Act of June 21, 1906, permitted adult mixed-blood
Indians to sell their land allotments. These lands were
again sold after the companies logged off the timber.

     As of June 30, 1971, all of the land on the reservation
was owned by private parties except for 53,476 acres, or
about 8 percent, which were owned as follows:

                     Ownership                   Acres

    Government--submarginal                      28,555
    Tribal                                       22,928
    Allotted by tribe to individual members       1,993

        Total                                    53,476




                             4
The tribe also owned about 2,640 acres of land consisting of
several scattered tracts in three townships adjoining the
reservation.




                              5
                         CHAPTER 2

              INFORMATION ON SUBMARGINAL AND

                       TRIBAL LANDS

LOCATION OF SUBMARGINAL LAND

     The Bureau's records show that, of the 28,555 acres of
submarginal land at the reservation, about 24,163 acres are
in tracts in two townships in Mahnomen County intermingled
with tribal, county, and State lands. The remaining acreage
consists of scattered tracts in Becker County. In total,
there are 54 tracts which range in size from 20 to 14,319
acres.

      The land was acquired by the United States Government
under the provisions of title II of the National Industrial
Recovery Act of June 16, 1933 (48 Stat. 200), the Emergency
Relief Appropriation Act of April 8, 1935 (49 Stat. 115),
and section 55 of the Act of August 24, 1935 (49 Stat. 750,
781).

     According to Bureau records, the Government originally
paid about $175,000 for this land. In 1962, we estimated,
on the basis of fair market values furnished by the county
assessors, that the market value of the land was $474,000.
On the basis of information furnished by a realty officer
at the Bureau's Minnesota Agency, we estimate that the mar-
ket value at the time of this review was $1.6 million.

IMPROVEMENTS ON SUBMARGINAL LAND

     In 1962 we reported that:

          "Improvements on submarginal land consist
     mainly of dwellings and farm buildings that were
     on the land when it was acquired by the Govern-
     ment. In addition, some improvements have been
     made on lakeshore lots by the individuals who
     lease the lots from the Bureau under revocable
     permits. We could not obtain reliable values
     for the improvements, but from limited available


                               6
     information and from our observations we believe
     that the values are insignificant."

The Minnesota Agency realty officer told us that, subsequent
to 1962, two houses, having an estimated value of $5,000
each, were placed on the submarginal land.

     The Bureau also made some improvements on the submar-
ginal land in connection with forestry management activi-
ties. Expenditures for these improvements between 1962 and
June 30, 1971, are as follows:

                                            Estimated
          Type of improvement              expenditure

     Reforestation                           $41,804
     Timber stand improvement                 18,619
     Roadside fire hazard reduction            5,838
     Boundary line survey                      5,400

         Total                               $71,661

     Also, at the time of our review, the Bureau was survey-
ing some of the submarginal land near one of the reserva-
tion's lakes for an access road and for subdividing 1 mile
of lake shore into 52 lots each having about a 100-foot
frontage. The Bureau will spend about $3,500 for the above
tasks. A Bureau official told us that the cost of the com-
plete project was estimated at $30,000 to $35,000; that the
tribe would contribute about 10 percent of the cost; and
that the remainder would be obtained from other sources,
such as grants, A tribal official told us that the tribe
would subpermit the lots at $1 per lakefront foot per year
and that this income would accrue to the tribe.




                                7
LAND USE

Present use of submarginal land

     Prior to January 20, 1960, the tribe leased submarginal
land directly to individuals for lakeshore sites, farming,
and gravel removal. No fees were paid to the Bureau and it
was estimated that the tribe collected about $2,000 a year
from these leases. On January 20, 1960, the Bureau advised
the tribe to terminate these leases and negotiate revocable
permits to be effective retroactively to May 15, 1959. Per-
mit revenues were to be deposited into the general fund of
the United States Treasury.

     Effective April 1, 1966, the tribe obtained a revocable
permit from the Bureau to use 3,963 acres of submarginal
land, exclusive of timber and mineral rights, on a free use
basis for agricultural and recreational purposes. The tribe
has derived income by subpermitting some of the submarginal
land for these purposes (see p.13). According to the Minne-
sota Agency realty officer, 16 subpermits were in effect as
of July 1971, mostly to non-Indians for lakeshore homesites.
We were advised also that about four Indian families reside
on the submarginal land without permits.
      The Bureau supervises the cutting of timber on submar-
ginal land in accordance with sustained-yield plans which
provide for the productive capacity of the land to be main-
tained. Also, under Federal regulations pertaining to Indian
forest lands (25 CFR 141), members of the tribe are allowed
to cut selected types of timber without permit and without
charge, provided it is for their personal use. Starting
about 1964 the market for timber species on the reservation's
submarginal land improved and receipts for timber harvested
since then have ranged from $14,725 in 1965 to $36,734 in
1969.

     As of June 30, 1971, the Bureau classified the submar-
ginal and tribal lands, including the 2,640 acres of tribal
land adjoining the reservation, as follows:




                             8
                                           Acres
        Classification            Submarginal       Tribal

Farm                                   950          3,517
Commercial timberland               19,071         19,011
Potential commercial timberland      2,154          1,774
Nonforest land                       6,380          1.266

   Total                            28 555         25.568




                             9
Efforts to use reservation land

      The White Earth Reservation Business Committee, on De-
cember 2, 1961, adopted an economic development plan which
dealt with the use of submarginal and tribal lands. The
plan was approved by tribal officers on March 8, 1962, and
by the United States Department of Commerce on September 8,
1962.

     The plan proposed that resources be developed to permit
the cultivation of cranberry marshes; the cultivation, har-
vesting, and processing of wild rice; mink farming; the
raising of poultry; the harvesting of maple syrup; dairying
and allied agricultural pursuits; and greater utilization of
recreational resources. Progress reports updating the plan
are submitted yearly.

     In July 1969, we reported to the Congressl that tribal
organizations and agencies had made some efforts at develop-
ment of the reservation's resources but that the efforts
were largely unsuccessful because of a lack of financing,
community interest, or necessary facilities.

     The tribe's progress report for 1971 updating its eco-
nomic development plan showed that two manufacturing plants
had located on reservation land. One plant had started pro-
duction of furnaces in June 1971 and employed 14 Indians.
The other plant started to produce all-terrain vehicles in
January 1971 but closed on April 30, 1971.




1 Effectivenessand Administration of the Community Action
 Program Administered by the White Earth Reservation Busi-
 ness Committee under Title II of the Economic Opportunity
 Act of 1964 (B-130515, July 15, 1969).


                             10
Potential use of submarginal land

     Bureau and tribal officials stated that if the submar-
ginal land is conveyed in trust to the tribe, the following
uses are likely to be made of the land.

     1. Forestry. Harvesting of timber would continue un-
der Bureau management but the revenues, less up to 10 per-
cent which the Bureau would charge to cover its administra-
tive costs, would go to the tribe rather than the United
States Treasury. The Bureau estimates receipts of $17,550
and $19,500 for fiscal years 1972 and 1973, respectively,
for timber cut from the submarginal land.

     2. Recreation. According to the officials, lakeshore
development, similar to the project described previously,
represents a potentially good source of income.

     3. Agriculture. Potential exists for wild rice paddy
development. Although the Bureau and tribal officials ap-
peared enthusiastic about such development in our discus-
sions with them, the Department of Agriculture District Con-
servationist told us that he had not been able to motivate
the tribe towards such a project in the past. The District
Conservationist also said that about 7,000 acres would be
suitable for grazing if the land was cleared.

     Bureau and tribal officials told us that plans had not
been developed and pursued for the submarginal land because
of uncertainties created by the requirement that revocable
permits be used. They told us that they believed that con-
veyance of this land to the tribe would result in such bene-
fits as additional employment and funds for housing and edu-
cation, with an attendant reduction in public welfare.

Housing and related
improvements

     Since 1962, 93 federally financed public housing units
and one unit under the Bureau's Housing Improvement Program
have been constructed on tribal land at a total cost of
$1,273,000. In addition $918,000 has been expended for
water and sewer improvements and 22.5 miles of roads have
been constructed on tribal lands. Conveyance of the
submarginal land would provide additional areas for similar
improvements.

Water resources

     The principal value of water resources on the submar-
ginal land relate to (1) recreation on land adjacent to the
lakes and (2) potential rice paddy development.

Mineral value

     In our 1962 report, we said that no valuable minerals
had been found in Mahnomen County. Bureau officials, the
Agriculture Department's District Conservationist, and the
Mahnomen County Executive Director, Agricultural Stabiliza-
tion and Conservation Service, told us that gravel was the
only known mineral deposit in the county.




                             12
TRIBAL FINANCIAL RESOURCES

     The Minnesota Chippewa Tribe's unaudited balance sheet
as of May 31, 1971, showed the financial condition of the
tribe as follows:

         Assets:
             Cash                      $      26,003
             Receivables                       3,162
             Equipment                         4,314
             Land and buildings            1,114,818

                 Total assets              1,148,297

         Liabilities                             264

                 Net worth              $19148,033

     The United States appropriated $3,932,205 to the tribe
in 1965 in settlement of a claim for lands ceded to the
United States in a treaty in 1855. Of this, $240,370 went
to the White Earth Reservation Business Committee to finance
industrial or other projects and $2,220,532 was distributed
to individual members of the tribe at White Earth.

     According to the Bureau, claims are pending for the
fair market value of lands ceded to the United States in
three other treaties. One third of any settlement would go
to the Mississippi Band of Chippewas, to which about 72 per-
cent of the White Earth members belong.

INCOME FROM SUBMARGINAL LAND

     From April 1966, when the Bureau issued the revocable
permit to the tribe for the use of 3,963 acres of submar-
ginal land, through June 30, 1971, the tribe's gross revenues
from subpermits totaled $8,125.

     From 1966 through June 30, 1971, the Bureau had re-
ceived revenue from the submarginal land as follows:




                                13
             Timber permits           $121,055
             Gravel permits                420

                 Total revenue        $121,475

CONCLUSION

     If beneficial interest in the submarginal land on the
White Earth Reservation is conveyed to the tribe, the rev-
enues now being collected by the Government, except for that
portion the Bureau would charge to cover its administrative
costs, would accrue to the tribe. Such revenues, in addi-
tion to those the tribe already receives through subpermits,
could help tribe members advance their social and economic
standing, provided they are invested in planning, estab-
lishing, and operating enterprises which would employ Indians
and have reasonable chances of success.




                              14
APPENDIX




   15
                                                                                                      APPENDIX I
          HBNRY M. JACKSON. WASH.. CHAIRMAN
CLINTON P. ANDERSON N. MIDEX.   GORDON ALLOT. CO_.
ALAN BIBLE, NEV.                LUN B. JORDAN. IDAHO
 RANK CHURCH IDAHO              PAUL J. PFANIN. ARIZ.
FRANK E. MOSS. UTAH             CLIFFORD P. HANIEN. WYO.
QUENTIN N. BURDICK. N. oAKC.    MARK 0. HATFIELD. OREG.
GEORGE MCGOVERN. S. DAK.
LEE M'ETCALF. MONT.
                                TED STEVENS, ALASKA
                                HENRY BELLMON. OKLA.
                                                           In      e        a   e         e      as
MIKE GRAVEL, ALASKA
                                                                        COMMITTEE ON
           JERRY T. VE(NKLER. STAFF DIRGCTOR                    INTERIOR AND INSULAR   AFFAIRS

                                                                  WASHINGTON. D.C.     20510

           B-147652
,ยท         B-147655                                                    April 1, 1971


           Honorable Elmer B. Staats
           Comptroller General of the United States
           Washington, D. C.

           Dear Elmer:

                     This letter is in reference to the Comptroller
           General's Report on Submarginal Land which was submitted to
           the House and Senate Committees on Interior and Insular Affairs
           on August 138 1962.

                     Recently, Senator Gordon Allott, ranking minority
           member of the Committee, and I introduced two bills S. 1217 and
           S. 1230 to convey beneficial interest in submarginal lands to
           the Indians on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota and the
           Stockbridge Munsee Indian Community in Wisconsin, respectively,
           with title to be held in trust by the United States Government.
           The bills were based on Executive Communications transmitted to
           the Congress by the Administration.

                     Hearings were held on the proposed legislation on
           March 26, 1971, with testimony being presented by Administration
           and tribal officials. The proposed legislation was discussed
           before the full Committee in executive session on March 31, 1971.
           At that time, Senator Allott moved that the two bills be tabled
           until such time as the Comptroller General could present the
           Committee with an updated revision of the 1962 report.

                     Please consider this letter an official request to
           have your staff begin an updating of the document in question.
           Also, you or representatives from your office may find it
           useful to discuss this matter with Mr. Jerry T. Verkler, Staff
           Director of the Committee.

                     In preparing for the revision, I believe it is
           important for you to give recognition to the fact that both
                                                                  16
                                                           APPENDIX I


Honorable Elmer B. Staats                -2-         April 1, 1971


the Administration and Congress have, in a sense, repudiated
the so-called "termination" policies of the 1950's. President
Nixon's Indian Message to Congress of July 8, 1970, clearly
states a policy of "Self-Determination, without Termination."
Also, during the past Congress, a number of concurrent resolu-
tions repudiating termination as a policy in the Indian field
were introduced in both Houses of Congress. The multi-agency
involvement in Indian affairs with identifiable Federal
expenditures in excess of $625 million in the 1971 fiscal
year is further evidence that we view development of the
human and natural resources of our Indian citizens as a more
realistic approach to this complex problem.

          I am hopeful that the updating of your 1962 Report on
Submarginal Lands will be undertaken within the more positive
climate of Indian affairs today, and that your staff will examine
closely how the conveyance of the lands in question to Indian
tribes can contribute to their social and economic advancement.

          Enclosed are copies of S. 1217 and S. 1230 currently
pending before our Committee. Will you please review these
bills now and submit an immediate report to the Committee on
them to expedite our consideration of this legislation.

             With every good wish,

                                         Sincerely      urs



                                          Henry ME. t kson
                                             Chairman



HMJ:fgr
Enclosures

Note:   Copies of S. 1217 and S. 1230 have not been reproduced herein.
        The requested report on the bills is being furnished separately.




                                    17