oversight

Public Accounting Firms: Required Study on the Potential Effects of Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation

Published by the Government Accountability Office on 2003-11-21.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

                United States General Accounting Office

GAO             Report to the Senate Committee on
                Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs and
                the House Committee on Financial
                Services

November 2003
                PUBLIC
                ACCOUNTING FIRMS
                Required Study on the
                Potential Effects of
                Mandatory Audit Firm
                Rotation




GAO-04-216
                a
                                                November 2003


                                                PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRMS

                                                Required Study on the Potential Effects
Highlights of GAO-04-216, a report to           of Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing,
and Urban Affairs and House Committee
on Financial Services




Following major failures in                     The arguments for and against mandatory audit firm rotation concern
corporate financial reporting, the              whether the independence of a public accounting firm auditing a company's
Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was                  financial statements is adversely affected by a firm's long-term relationship
enacted to protect investors                    with the client and the desire to retain the client. Concerns about the
through requirements intended to                potential effects of mandatory audit firm rotation include whether its
improve the accuracy and
reliability of corporate disclosures
                                                intended benefits would outweigh the costs and the loss of company-specific
and to restore investor confidence.             knowledge gained by an audit firm through years of experience auditing the
The act included reforms intended               client. In addition, questions exist about whether the Sarbanes-Oxley Act
to strengthen auditor independence              requirements for reform will accomplish the intended benefits of mandatory
and to improve audit quality.                   audit firm rotation.
Mandatory audit firm rotation
(setting a limit on the period of               In surveys conducted as part of our study, GAO found that almost all of the
years a public accounting firm may              largest public accounting firms and Fortune 1000 publicly traded companies
audit a particular company’s                    believe that the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation are likely to exceed
financial statements) was                       the benefits. Most believe that the current requirements for audit partner
considered as a reform to enhance               rotation, auditor independence, and other reforms, when fully implemented,
auditor independence and audit
quality during the congressional
                                                will sufficiently achieve the intended benefits of mandatory audit firm
hearings that preceded the act, but             rotation. Moreover, in interviews with other stakeholders, including
it was not included in the act. The             institutional investors, stock market regulators, bankers, accountants, and
Congress decided that mandatory                 consumer advocacy groups, GAO found the views of these stakeholders to
audit firm rotation needed further              be consistent with the overall views of those who responded to its surveys.
study and required GAO to study
the potential effects of requiring              GAO believes that mandatory audit firm rotation may not be the most
rotation of the public accounting               efficient way to strengthen auditor independence and improve audit quality
firms that audit public companies               considering the additional financial costs and the loss of institutional
registered with the Securities and              knowledge of the public company’s previous auditor of record, as well as the
Exchange Commission.
                                                current reforms being implemented. The potential benefits of mandatory
                                                audit firm rotation are harder to predict and quantify, though GAO is fairly
                                                certain that there will be additional costs.

                                                Several years’ experience with implementation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s
                                                reforms is needed, GAO believes, before the full effect of the act’s
                                                requirements can be assessed. GAO therefore believes that the most prudent
                                                course of action at this time is for the Securities and Exchange Commission
                                                and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board to monitor and
                                                evaluate the effectiveness of existing requirements for enhancing auditor
                                                independence and audit quality.

                                                GAO believes audit committees, with their increased responsibilities under
                                                the act, can also play an important role in ensuring auditor independence. To
                                                fulfill this role, audit committees must maintain independence and have
                                                adequate resources. Finally, for any system to function effectively, there
www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-216.
                                                must be incentives for parties to do the right thing, adequate transparency
To view the full product, including the scope   over what is being done, and appropriate accountability if the right things
and methodology, click on the link above.       are not done.
For more information, contact Jeanette M.
Franzel at (202) 512-9471 or
franzelj@gao.gov.
Contents



Letter                                                                                                  1
                             Results in Brief                                                           5
                             Background                                                                10
                             Pros and Cons of Requiring Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation                  13
                             Results of Our Surveys                                                    14
                             Competition-Related Issues                                                33
                             Overall Views on Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation                            37
                             Overall Views of Other Knowledgeable Individuals on Mandatory
                               Audit Firm Rotation                                                     40
                             Survey Groups Views on Implementing Mandatory Audit Firm
                               Rotation if Required and Other Alternatives for Enhancing Audit
                               Quality                                                                 44
                             Auditor Experience in Restatements of annual Financial Statements
                               Filed with the SEC for 2001 and 2002                                    46
                             Experience of Foreign Countries with Mandatory Audit Firm
                               Rotation                                                                48
                             GAO Observations                                                          49
                             Agency Comments and Our Evaluation                                        52


Appendixes
              Appendix I:    Objectives, Scope, and Methodology                                        54
             Appendix II:    Implementation of Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation, if
                             Required                                                                  72
             Appendix III:   Potential Value of Practices Other Than Mandatory Audit
                             Firm Rotation for Enhancing Auditor Independence and
                             Audit Quality                                                             75
             Appendix IV:    Restatements of Annual Financial Statements for Fortune
                             1000 Public Companies Due To Errors or Fraud                              78
              Appendix V:    International Experience with Mandatory Audit Firm
                             Rotation                                                                  83
             Appendix VI:    GAO Contacts and Staff Acknowledgments                                    91
                             GAO Contacts                                                              91
                             Staff Acknowledgments                                                     91


Tables                       Table 1: Audit Committee Chairs’ Reasons for Limiting
                                      Consideration to Only Big 4 Firms                                37
                             Table 2: Public Accounting Firms’ Population, Sample Sizes, and
                                      Survey Response Rates                                            62



                             Page i                                     GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
          Contents




          Table 3: Public Company Chief Financial Officers’ Population,
                   Sample Sizes, and Survey Response Rates                           66
          Table 4: Public Company Audit Committee Chairs’ Population,
                   Sample Sizes, and Survey Response Rates                           66
          Table 5: Views on Potential Value of Other Practices for Enhancing
                   Auditor Independence and Audit Quality                            77
          Table 6: Summary Results of the Fortune 1000 Public Companies
                   That Changed Auditors                                             79
          Table 7: Summary Results of the Fortune 1000 Public Companies
                   That Did Not Change Auditors                                      79
          Table 8: Summary of Net Dollar Effect of Restatements Due to
                   Errors and Fraud                                                  82


Figures   Figure 1: Estimated Audit Firm Tenure for Fortune 1000 Public
                    Companies                                                        17
          Figure 2: Tier 1 Firms: Value of Additional Procedures When Firm
                    Has Less Knowledge and Experience with a Client                  20
          Figure 3: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Belief That Additional or
                    Enhanced Audit Procedures Would Affect the Risk of Not
                    Detecting Material Misstatements                                 21
          Figure 4: Views on How Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation Would
                    Affect the Auditor’s Potential to Deal with Material
                    Financial Reporting Issues Appropriately                         24
          Figure 5: Expected Increase in Initial Year Audit Costs over
                    Subsequent Year Audit Costs                                      28
          Figure 6: Tier 1 Firms Expecting Additional Expected Marketing
                    Costs under Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation Compared to
                    Initial Year Audit Fees                                          30
          Figure 7: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Expected Selection
                    Costs as a Percentage of Initial Year Audit Fees                 31
          Figure 8: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Expected Support Costs
                    as a Percentage of Initial Year Audit Fees                       32
          Figure 9: Support for Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation                        40




          Page ii                                     GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Contents




Abbreviations

AICPA                 American Institute of Certified Public Accountants
CGAA                  Co-ordinating Group on Audit and Accounting Issues
CNMV                  Comision Nacional del Mercaso de Valores
CONSOB                Commissione Nazionale per le Societa e la Borsa
CVM                   Comissao de Valores Mobiliarios
EDGAR                 Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval
G-7                   Group of Seven Industrialized Nations
GAAP                  generally accepted accounting principles
GAAS                  generally accepted auditing standards
IOSCO                 International Organization of Securities Commissions
NIvRA                 Royal Nederlands Instituut van Register Accountants
NOvAA                 Nederlandse Orde van Accountants-
                      Administratieconsulenten
OSFI                  Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions
PCAOB                 Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
POB                   Public Oversight Board
SEC                   Securities and Exchange Commission
SECPS                 SEC Practice Section




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Page iii                                              GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
A
United States General Accounting Office
Washington, D.C. 20548



                                    November 21, 2003                                                                                   Leter




                                    The Honorable Richard C. Shelby
                                    Chairman
                                    The Honorable Paul S. Sarbanes
                                    Ranking Minority Member
                                    Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
                                    United States Senate

                                    The Honorable Michael G. Oxley
                                    Chairman
                                    The Honorable Barney Frank
                                    Ranking Minority Member
                                    Committee on Financial Services
                                    House of Representatives

                                    Full, fair, and accurate reporting of financial information by public
                                    companies1 is critical to the effective functioning of the capital and credit
                                    markets in the United States. Federal securities laws and regulations
                                    require publicly owned companies to disclose financial information in a
                                    manner that accurately depicts the results of company activities and
                                    require that the companies’ financial statements be audited by an
                                    independent public accountant. Although public company management is
                                    responsible for the company’s financial statements, public confidence in
                                    the integrity of financial statements of publicly traded companies is
                                    enhanced by the audit process and independence of the auditor from the
                                    audit client.

                                    Major failures in corporate financial reporting in recent years, including
                                    accountability breakdowns at Enron and WorldCom and other major
                                    corporations, that led to restatement of financial statements and
                                    bankruptcy adversely affected thousands of shareholders and employees.
                                    As a result, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 20022 was enacted to protect
                                    investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate
                                    disclosures. The act’s requirements included reforms to strengthen


                                    1
                                      For purposes of this report, public companies refers to issuers, the securities of which are
                                    registered under 15 U.S.C. § 78l, that are required to file reports under 15 U.S.C. § 780 (d), or
                                    that file or have filed a registration statements that have not yet become effective under the
                                    Securities Act of 1933.
                                    2
                                        Pub. L. No. 107-204, 116 Stat. 745.




                                    Page 1                                                    GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
corporate responsibility for financial reports and auditor independence and
created the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The
PCAOB has the responsibility to register and inspect public accounting
firms that audit public companies, and the authority to investigate and
discipline registered public accounting firms and to set auditing and related
attestation, quality control, and auditor ethics and independence standards
in connection with audits of public companies.

Senate report 107-205 that accompanied the Sarbanes-Oxley Act stated that
in considering reforms to enhance auditor independence, some witnesses
believed that mandatory audit firm rotation3 of public accounting firms was
necessary to maintain the objectivity of audits, while other witnesses
believed that public accounting firm rotation could be disruptive to the
public company and the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation might
outweigh the benefits. The Congress decided that mandatory audit firm
rotation needed further study and required in Section 207 of the Sarbanes-
Oxley Act that GAO study the issues. Specifically, we were asked to study
the potential effects of requiring mandatory rotation of registered public
accounting firms.4 To conduct our study, we did the following:

• Identified and reviewed research studies and other documents that
  addressed issues concerning auditor independence and audit quality
  associated with the length of a public accounting firm’s tenure and the
  costs and benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation.

• Analyzed the issues we identified to (1) develop detailed questionnaires
  to obtain the views of public accounting firms and public company chief
  financial officers and their audit committee chairs of the issues
  associated with mandatory audit firm rotation, (2) hold discussions with
  officials of other interested stakeholders, such as institutional investors,
  federal banking regulators, U.S. stock exchanges, state boards of
  accountancy, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants


3
  Mandatory rotation is defined in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as the imposition of a limit on the
period of years in which a particular public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB may
be the auditor of record for a particular public company. For purposes of this report, the
auditor of record is the public accounting firm issuing an audit opinion of the public
company’s financial statements.
4
  Section 102 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires public accounting firms that want to audit
public companies to register with the PCAOB and states that it shall be unlawful for any
person who is not a registered public accounting firm to prepare, issue, or participate in the
preparation or issuance of any audit report with respect to any issuer.




Page 2                                                  GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
   (AICPA), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and the
   PCAOB to obtain their views on the issues associated with mandatory
   audit firm rotation, and (3) obtain information from other countries on
   their experiences with mandatory audit firm rotation.

• Identified restatements of annual financial statements for Fortune 1000
  public companies due to errors or fraud that were reported to the SEC
  for years 2001 and 2002 through August 31, 2003, to (1) determine
  whether the restatement occurred after a change in the public
  companies’ auditor of record, and (2) to obtain some insight into the
  value of a “fresh look” by a new auditor of record.

Our population of public accounting firms consisted of three tiers: Tier 1
firms included 92 public accounting firms that were members of the
AICPA’s self-regulatory program for audit quality that reported having 10 or
more SEC clients in 2001 and 5 public accounting firms that were not
members of the AICPA’s self-regulatory program but had 10 or more public
company clients registered with the SEC in 2001.5 Tier 2 firms included 604
public accounting firms that were members of the AICPA’s self-regulatory
program for audit quality that reported having 1 to 9 public company clients
registered with the SEC in 2001.6 Tier 3 firms included 421 public
accounting firms that were members of the AICPA’s self-regulatory
program for audit quality that reported having no public company clients
registered with the SEC in 2001. We surveyed 100 percent of the 97 Tier 1,
firms and we administered our surveys to random samples of 282 of the 604
Tier 2 firms and 237 of the 421 Tier 3 firms. We received responses from 74
of the 97 Tier 1 firms, or 76.3 percent.7 Because of the more limited
participation of Tier 2 firms (85, or 30.1 percent) and Tier 3 firms (52, or
21.9 percent) in our survey, we are not projecting their responses to the
population of these firms. The presentation of this report focuses on the


5
  The 92 Tier 1 firms with 10 or more public company clients represented about 90 percent of
the total public company clients reported by member firms in their 2001 annual reports to
the AICPA's former self-regulatory program for audit quality. Hereafter in this report, "Tier 1
firms" refers to the 97 firms that had 10 or more public company clients.
6
  The 604 Tier 2 firms with 1 to 9 public company clients in 2001 represented about 10
percent of the total public company clients reported by member firms in their 2001 annual
reports to the AICPA's former self-regulatory program for audit quality.
7
  Estimates of Tier 1 firms are subject to sampling errors of no more than plus or minus 7
percentage points (95 percent confidence level) unless otherwise noted, as well as to
possible nonsampling errors generally found in surveys.




Page 3                                                   GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
responses from the Tier 1 firms, but any substantial differences in their
overall views and those reported to us by either the Tier 2 or 3 firms that
responded to our survey is discussed where applicable.

We also drew random samples of 330 of the Fortune 1000 public
companies8 after removing 40 private companies from the list, 450 of the
14,887 other domestic companies and mutual funds, and 391 of 2,141
foreign companies that make up the universe of the 17,988 public
companies that are registered with the SEC as of February 2003. For each
of these three groups of public companies, we asked their chief financial
officers and audit committee chairs to complete separate questionnaires.

Of the 330 Fortune 1000 public companies sampled, we received responses
from 201, or 60.9 percent, of their chief financial officers and 191, or 57.9
percent, of their audit committee chairs.9 Because of limited participation
of the other domestic companies and mutual funds (131, or 29.1 percent, of
their chief financial officers and 96, or 21.3 percent, of their audit
committee chairs) and the foreign public companies (99, or 25.3 percent, of
their chief financial officers and 63, or 16.1 percent, of their audit
committee chairs), we are not projecting their responses to the population
of such companies. This report focuses on the responses from the Fortune
1000 public companies’ chief financial officers and their audit committee
chairs, but any substantial differences between their overall views and
those reported to us by the other groups of public companies that
responded to our surveys is discussed where applicable.

For additional information on our scope and methodology including details
of our samples, response rates, and efforts to follow up with
nonrespondents to our surveys, see appendix I. We conducted our work in
Washington, D.C., between November 2002 and November 2003 in
accordance with U.S. generally accepted government auditing standards.




8
  We removed 40 private companies from the list of Fortune 1000 public companies.
Therefore, our population of Fortune 1000 public companies was 960.
9
  The estimates from these surveys are subject to sampling errors of no more than plus or
minus 6 percentage points (95 percent confidence level) unless otherwise noted, as well as
to possible nonsampling errors generally found in surveys.




Page 4                                                GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                   A copy of each of our questionnaires, annotated to show in total the
                   respondents’ answers to each question for the Tier 1 firms and the Fortune
                   1000 public companies chief financial officers10 and their audit committee
                   chairs, will be presented in a separate GAO report (GAO-04-217) to be
                   issued at a later date.



Results in Brief   Nearly all Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies and their audit
                   committee chairs believed that the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation
                   are likely to exceed the benefits. Also, most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000
                   public companies and their audit committee chairs believe that either the
                   audit firm partner rotation requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as
                   implemented by the SEC, or those partner rotation requirements coupled
                   with other requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act that concern auditor
                   independence and audit quality, will sufficiently achieve the benefits of
                   mandatory audit firm rotation when fully implemented. Our discussions
                   with a number of other knowledgeable individuals in a variety of fields,
                   such as institutional investment; regulation of the stock markets, the
                   banking industry, and the accounting profession; and consumer advocacy,
                   showed that most of the individuals we spoke with held views consistent
                   with the overall views expressed by those who responded to our surveys.

                   Considering the arguments for and against mandatory audit firm rotation
                   and the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act concerning auditor
                   independence and audit quality, which are also intended to achieve the
                   same type of benefits as mandatory audit firm rotation, we believe that
                   more experience needs to be gained with the act’s requirements. Therefore,
                   the most prudent course at this time is for the SEC and the PCAOB to
                   monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the act’s requirements to
                   determine whether further revisions, including mandatory audit firm
                   rotation, may be needed to enhance auditor independence and audit quality
                   to protect the public interest.

                   Our research of studies concerning issues related to mandatory audit firm
                   rotation showed the primary arguments relate to auditor independence,
                   audit quality, audit cost, and competition-related issues for providing audit
                   services. Regarding auditor independence and audit quality issues, our



                   10
                        Hereafter, "Fortune 1000 public companies" refers to their chief financial officers.




                   Page 5                                                     GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
analysis of survey results of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public
companies showed the following:

• The average length of the auditor of record’s tenure, which proponents
  of mandatory audit firm rotation believe increases the risk that auditor
  independence and ultimately audit quality may be adversely affected,
  was about 22 years for Fortune 1000 public companies.

• About 79 percent of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies
  believe that changing audit firms increases the risk of an audit failure in
  the early years of the audit as the new auditor acquires the necessary
  knowledge of the company’s operations, systems, and financial
  reporting practices and therefore may fail to detect a material financial
  reporting issue.

• Most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies believe that
  mandatory audit firm rotation would not have much effect on the
  pressures faced by the audit engagement partner in appropriately
  dealing with material financial reporting issues.

• About 59 percent of Tier 1 firms reported they would likely move their
  most knowledgeable and experienced audit staff as the end of the firm’s
  tenure approached under mandatory audit firm rotation to attract or
  retain other clients, which they acknowledged would increase the risk
  of an audit failure.

Regarding audit costs, our survey results show that Tier 1 firms and
Fortune 1000 public companies expect that mandatory audit firm rotation
would lead to more costly audits.

• Nearly all Tier 1 firms estimated that initial year audit costs under
  mandatory audit firm rotation would increase by more than 20 percent
  over subsequent year costs to acquire the necessary knowledge of the
  public company and most of the Tier 1 firms estimated their marketing
  costs would also increase by at least more than 1 percent, which would
  be passed on to the public companies.

• Most Fortune 1000 public companies estimated that under mandatory
  audit firm rotation, they would incur auditor selection costs and
  additional auditor support costs totaling at least 17 percent or higher as
  a percentage of initial year audit fees.




Page 6                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Our check of audit fees and total company operating expenses reported by
a selection of large and small public companies in 23 industries for the
most recent fiscal year available found that for the large public companies
selected, average audit fees represented approximately 0.04 percent of
company operating expenses and, for the small public companies selected,
average audit fees represented approximately 0.08 percent of company
operating expenses. Based on estimates of possible increased audit-related
costs from survey responses from Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public
companies, mandatory audit firm rotation could increase these audit-
related costs from 43 percent to 128 percent of the recurring annual audit
fees. This illustration is intended only to provide some insight into how,
based on Tier 1 firms’ and Fortune 1000 public companies’ responses,
mandatory audit firm rotation may affect the initial year audit-related costs
public companies may incur and is not intended to be representative.

Regarding competition-related effects of mandatory audit firm rotation, 54
percent of Tier 1 firms believe mandatory audit firm rotation would
decrease the number of firms willing and able to compete for audits of
public companies and 83 percent of Tier 1 firms believe that the market
share of public company audits would either become more concentrated in
a small number of public accounting firms or would remain the same. As
we have previously reported,11 the number of public accounting firms
providing audit services to public companies is highly concentrated with
the 4 largest firms auditing over 78 percent of all U.S. public companies and
99 percent of public company sales. Many Fortune 1000 public companies
reported that they will only use a Big 4 firm for a variety of reasons,
including the capability of the firms to provide them audit services and the
expectations of the capital markets that they will use Big 4 firms.
Mandatory audit firm rotation would further decrease their choices for an
auditor of record, and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act auditor independence
requirements concerning prohibited nonaudit services may also further
limit the public companies’ choices for an auditor of record. Tier 1 firms
expected that public companies in specialized industries, which in some
industries currently have more limited choices for an auditor of record than
other public companies, could be more affected by mandatory audit firm
rotation than other public companies.




11
 U.S. General Accounting Office, Public Accounting Firms: Mandated Study on
Consolidation and Competition, GAO-03-864 (Washington, D.C.: July 30, 2003).




Page 7                                             GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
We believe that mandatory audit firm rotation may not be the most efficient
way to enhance auditor independence and audit quality considering the
additional financial costs and the loss of institutional knowledge of a public
company’s previous auditor of record. The potential benefits of mandatory
audit firm rotation are harder to predict and quantify, though we are fairly
certain that there will be additional costs. In addition, the current reforms
being implemented may also provide some of the intended benefits of
mandatory audit firm rotation. In that respect, mandatory audit firm
rotation is not a panacea that totally removes the pressures on the auditors
in appropriately resolving financial reporting issues that may materially
affect the public companies’ financial statements. These inherent
pressures are likely to continue even if the term of the auditor is limited
under any mandatory rotation process. Furthermore, most public
companies will only use the Big 4 firms for audit services. Given this
preference, these public companies may only have 1 or 2 real choices for
auditor of record under any mandatory rotation system given the
importance of industry expertise and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s auditor
independence requirements. However, over time a mandatory audit firm
rotation requirement may result in more firms transitioning into additional
industry sectors if the market for such audits has sufficient profit margins.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act contains significant reforms aimed at enhancing
auditor independence (e.g., additional partner rotation requirements and
restrictions on providing nonaudit or consulting services) and audit quality
(e.g., establishing the PCAOB and management and auditor reporting on
internal controls over financial reporting) that are also intended to achieve
the same type of benefits as mandatory audit firm rotation. The PCAOB’s
inspection program for registered public accounting firms could also
provide an opportunity to provide a “fresh look”, which would enhance
auditor independence and audit quality through the program’s inspection
activities and also may provide new insights regarding (1) public
companies’ financial reporting practices that pose a high risk of issuing
materially misstated financial statements for the audit committees to
consider and (2) possibly either using the auditor of record or another firm
to assist in reviewing these areas. However, it will take at least several
years for the SEC and the PCAOB to gain sufficient experience with the
effectiveness of the act in order to adequately evaluate whether further
enhancements or revisions, including mandatory audit firm rotation, may
be needed to further protect the public interest and to restore investor
confidence. The current environment has greatly increased the pressures
on public company management and auditors regarding honest, fair, and
complete financial reporting, but it is uncertain if the current climate will



Page 8                                         GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
be sustained over the long term. Rigorous enforcement of the act’s
requirements will undoubtedly be critical to its effectiveness.

We also believe that audit committees with their increased responsibilities
under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act can play a very important role in enhancing
auditor independence and audit quality. In that respect, the Conference
Board Commission on Public Trust and Private Enterprise stated in its
January 9, 2003, report that auditor rotation is a useful tool for building
shareholder confidence in the integrity of the audit and of the company’s
financial statements. The commission advocated that audit committees
should consider rotating audit firms when there are circumstances that
could call into question the audit firm’s independence from management.
These circumstances included when (1) significant nonaudit services are
provided by the auditor of record to the company (even if approved by the
audit committee), (2) one or more former partners or managers of the audit
firm are employed by the company, or (3) lengthy tenure of the auditor of
record, such as over 10 years—which our survey results show is prevalent
at many Fortune 1000 public companies. We believe audit committees that
encounter these circumstances, at a minimum, need to be especially
vigilant in the oversight of the auditor and in considering whether a “fresh
look” (e.g., new auditor) is needed. We also believe that if audit
committees regularly evaluated whether audit firm rotation would be
beneficial, given the facts and circumstances of their companies’ situation,
and are actively involved in helping to ensure auditor independence and
audit quality, many of the benefits of audit firm rotation could be realized at
the initiative of the audit committees rather than through a mandatory
rotation requirement.

In order to be effective, however, audit committees need to have access to
adequate resources, including their own budgets, to be able to operate with
the independence necessary to effectively perform their responsibilities
under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Further, we believe that the audit
committee’s ability to operate independently is directly related to the
independence of the public company’s board of directors. It is not realistic
to believe that an audit committee will unilaterally resolve financial
reporting issues that materially affect a public company’s financial
statements without vetting those issues with the board of directors. Also,
the ability of the board of directors to operate independently may also be
affected in corporate governance structures where the public company’s
chief executive officer also serves as the chair of the board of directors.
Like audit committees, boards of directors also need to be independent and
have adequate resources and access to independent attorneys and other



Page 9                                         GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
             advisors when they believe it is appropriate. Finally, for any system to
             function effectively, there must be incentives for parties to do the right
             thing, adequate transparency to provide reasonable assurance that people
             will do the right thing, and appropriate accountability when people do not
             do the right thing.

             This report makes no recommendations. We provided copies of a draft of
             this report to the SEC, AICPA, and PCAOB for their review.
             Representatives of the AICPA and the PCAOB provided technical
             comments, which we have incorporated where applicable. Representatives
             of the SEC had no comments.



Background   Under federal securities laws, public companies are responsible for the
             preparation and content of financial statements that are complete,
             accurate, and presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting
             principles (GAAP). Financial statements, which disclose a company’s
             financial position, stockholders’ equity, results of operations, and cash
             flows, are an essential component of the disclosure system on which the
             U.S. capital and credit markets are based.

             The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires that a public company’s
             financial statements be audited by an independent public accountant. That
             statutory independent audit requirement in effect granted a franchise to the
             nation’s public accountants, as an audit opinion on a public company’s
             financial statements must be secured before an issuer of securities can go
             to market, have the securities listed on the nation’s stock exchanges, or
             comply with the reporting requirements of the securities laws. As of
             February 2003, there were about 17,988 public companies that were
             registered with the SEC and subject to the federal securities laws (15,847
             domestic and 2,141 foreign public companies). Based on 2001 annual
             reports of public accounting firms submitted to the AICPA, about 700
             public accounting firms that were members of the AICPA's former self-
             regulatory program for audit quality reported having approximately 15,000
             public company clients registered with the SEC, of which the Big 4 public
             accounting firms12 had about 70 percent of these public company clients
             and another 88 public accounting firms had about 20 percent of these



             12
                  PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Ernst & Young LLP, Deloitte & Touche LLP, and KPMG LLP.




             Page 10                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
public company clients. The other approximately 600 public accounting
firms had the remaining 10 percent of the reported public company clients.

The independent public accountant’s audit is critical in the financial
reporting process because the audit subjects financial statements, which
are management’s responsibility, to scrutiny on behalf of shareholders and
creditors to whom management is accountable. The auditor is the
independent link between management and those who rely on the financial
statements.

Ensuring auditor independence—both in fact and appearance—is a long-
standing issue. There has long been an arguably inherent conflict in the
fact that an auditor is paid by the public company for which the audit was
being performed. Various study groups over the past 20 years have
considered the independence and objectivity of auditors as questions have
arisen from (1) significant litigation involving auditors, (2) the auditor’s
performance of nonaudit services for audit clients, which prior to the
Sarbanes-Oxley Act, had risen to 50 percent of total revenues on average
for the large accounting firms,13 (3) “opinion shopping” by clients, and
(4) reports of public accountants advocating questionable client positions
on accounting matters.

The major accountability breakdowns at Enron and WorldCom, and other
failures in recent years such as Qwest, Tyco, Adelphia, Global Crossing,
Waste Management, Micro Strategy, Superior Federal Savings Bank, and
Xerox, led to the reforms contained in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act to enhance
auditor independence and audit quality and to restore investor confidence
in the nation’s capital markets. To enhance auditor independence and audit
quality, the act’s reforms included

• establishing the PCAOB, as an independent nongovernmental entity, to
  oversee the audit of public companies that are subject to the securities
  laws;

• making the PCAOB responsible for (1) establishing auditing and related
  attestation, quality control, ethics, and independence standards
  applicable to audits of public companies, (2) conducting inspections,
  investigations, and disciplinary proceedings of public accounting firms
  registered with the PCAOB, and (3) imposing appropriate sanctions;


13
     Senate Report 107-205, at 14 (2002).




Page 11                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
• making the public company’s audit committee responsible for the
  appointment, compensation, and oversight of the registered public
  accounting firm;

• requiring management and auditors’ reports on internal control over
  financial reporting;

• prohibiting the registered public accounting firm from providing certain
  nonaudit services to a public company if the auditor is also providing
  audit services;

• requiring the audit committee to preapprove all audit and nonaudit
  services not otherwise prohibited;

• requiring mandatory rotation of lead and reviewing audit partners after
  they have provided audit services to a particular public company for 5
  consecutive years; and

• prohibiting the public accounting firm from providing audit services if
  the public company’s chief financial officer, chief accounting officer, or
  any person serving in an equivalent position was employed by the firm
  and participated in the audit of the public company during the 1-year
  period preceding the date of starting the audit.

Mandatory audit firm rotation was also discussed in congressional hearings
to enhance auditor independence and audit quality, but given the mixed
views of various stakeholders, the Congress decided the effects of such a
practice needed further study.




Page 12                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Pros and Cons of      Our review of research studies, technical articles, and other publications
                      and documents showed that generally the arguments for and against
Requiring Mandatory   mandatory audit firm rotation concern auditor independence, audit
Audit Firm Rotation   quality,14 and increased audit costs. A breakdown in auditor independence
                      or audit quality can result in an audit failure and adversely affect those
                      parties who rely on the fair presentation of the financial statements in
                      conformity with GAAP.

                      Those who support mandatory audit firm rotation contend that pressures
                      faced by the incumbent auditor to retain the audit client coupled with the
                      auditor’s comfort level with management developed over time can
                      adversely affect the auditor’s actions to appropriately deal with financial
                      reporting issues that materially affect the company’s financial statements.
                      Those who oppose audit firm rotation contend that the new auditor’s lack
                      of knowledge of the company’s operations, information systems that
                      support the financial statements, and financial reporting practices and the
                      time needed to acquire that knowledge increase the risk of an auditor not
                      detecting financial reporting issues that could materially affect the
                      company’s financial statements in the initial years of the new auditor’s
                      tenure, resulting in financial statements that do not comply with GAAP.

                      In addition, those who oppose mandatory audit firm rotation believe that it
                      will increase costs incurred by both the public accounting firms and the
                      public companies. They believe the increased risk of an audit failure and
                      the added costs of audit firm rotation outweigh the value of a periodic
                      “fresh look” by a new public accounting firm. Conversely, those who
                      support audit firm rotation believe the value of the “fresh look” to protect
                      shareholders, creditors, and other parties who rely on the financial



                      14
                        Audit quality as used in this report refers to the auditor conducting the audit in
                      accordance with generally accepted auditing standards (GAAS) to provide reasonable
                      assurance that the audited financial statements and related disclosures are (1) presented in
                      conformity with GAAP and (2) are not materially misstated whether due to errors or fraud.
                      This definition assumes that reasonable third parties with knowledge of the relevant facts
                      and circumstances would have concluded that the audit was conducted in accordance with
                      GAAS and that, within the requirements of GAAS, the auditor appropriately detected and
                      then dealt with known material misstatements by (1) ensuring that appropriate adjustments,
                      related disclosures, and other changes were made to the financial statements to prevent
                      them from being materially misstated, (2) modifying the auditor’s opinion on the financial
                      statements if appropriate adjustments and other changes were not made, or (3) if
                      warranted, resigning as the public company’s auditor of record and reporting the reason for
                      the resignation to the SEC.




                      Page 13                                                GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                         statements outweigh the added costs associated with mandatory firm
                         rotation.

                         More recently, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s requirements that concern auditor
                         independence and audit quality have added to the mixed views about
                         whether mandatory audit firm rotation should also be required to enhance
                         auditor independence and audit quality.



Results of Our Surveys   The results of our surveys show that while auditor tenure at Fortune 1000
                         public companies averages 22 years, about 79 percent of Tier 115 firms and
                         Fortune 1000 public companies16 are concerned that changing public
                         accounting firms increases the risk of an audit failure in the initial years of
                         the audit as the new auditor acquires the knowledge of a public company’s
                         operations, systems, and financial reporting practices. Further, many
                         Fortune 1000 public companies will only use Big 4 public accounting firms
                         and believe that the limited choices, that are likely to be further reduced by
                         the auditor independence requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, coupled
                         with the likely increased costs of financial statement audits and increased
                         risk of an audit failure under mandatory audit firm rotation strongly argue
                         against the need for mandatory rotation.

                         In addition, most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies believe
                         that the pressures faced by the incumbent auditor to retain the client are
                         not a significant factor adversely affecting the auditor appropriately dealing
                         with financial reporting issues that may materially affect a public
                         company’s financial statements. Most Tier 1 firms, and nearly all Fortune
                         1000 public companies, and their audit committee chairs believe that the
                         Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s requirements concerning auditor independence and
                         audit quality, when fully implemented, will sufficiently achieve the intended
                         benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation, and therefore, they believe it
                         would be premature to impose mandatory audit firm rotation at this time.

                         Finally, about 50 percent of Tier 1 firms and 62 percent of Fortune 1000
                         public companies stated that mandatory audit firm rotation would have no


                         15
                           Hereafter, the presentation of our detailed Tier 1 firm survey results represent estimated
                         projections to their population.
                         16
                           Hereafter, the presentation of our detailed Fortune 1000 public companies’ and their audit
                         committee chairs’ survey results represent estimated projections to their populations.




                         Page 14                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                            effect on the perception of auditor independence held by the capital
                            markets and institutional investors. However, 65 percent of Fortune 1000
                            public companies reported that individual investors’ perception of auditor
                            independence would be increased, while the Tier 1 firms had mixed views
                            on the effect on individual investors’ perceptions. At the same time, most
                            Tier 1 firms reported that mandatory audit firm rotation may negatively
                            affect audit assignment staffing, causing an increased risk of audit failures,
                            and may create some confusion as currently a change in a public company’s
                            auditor of record sends a “red flag” signal as to why the change may have
                            occurred. In contrast, most Fortune 1000 public companies did not believe
                            scheduled changes in the auditor of record would result in a “red flag”
                            signal.



Auditor of Record Tenure,   Currently, neither the SEC nor the PCAOB has set any regulatory limits on
Independence, and Audit     the length of time that a public accounting firm may function as the auditor
                            of record for a public company. Based on the responses to our surveys, we
Quality                     estimate that about 99 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies and their
                            audit committees currently do not have a public accounting firm rotation
                            policy, although we estimate that about 4 percent are considering such a
                            policy. Unlimited tenure and related pressure on the public accounting firm
                            and applicable partner responsible for providing audit services to the
                            company to retain the client and the related continuing revenues are
                            factors cited by those who support mandatory audit firm rotation. They
                            believe that periodically having a new auditor will bring a “fresh look” to
                            the public company’s financial reporting and help the auditor appropriately
                            deal with financial reporting issues since the auditor’s tenure would be
                            limited under mandatory audit firm rotation. Those who oppose
                            mandatory audit firm rotation believe that changing auditors increases the
                            risk of an audit failure during the initial years as the new auditor acquires
                            the knowledge of the public company’s operations, systems, and financial
                            reporting practices.




                            Page 15                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
The Conference Board’s Commission on Public Trust and Private
Enterprise17 in its January 9, 2003, report recommended that audit
committees should consider rotating audit firms when there is a
combination of circumstances that could call into question the audit firm’s
independence from management. The Commission believed that the
existence of some or all of the following circumstances particularly merit
consideration of rotation: (1) significant nonaudit services are provided by
the auditor of record to the company—even if they have been approved by
the audit committee, (2) one or more former partners or managers of the
audit firm are employed by the company, or (3) the audit firm has been
employed by the company for a substantial period of time, such as over 10
years.

To initially examine the issues surrounding the length of the auditors’
tenure, we asked public companies and public accounting firms to provide
information on the length of auditor tenure. According to our survey,
Fortune 1000 public companies’ average auditor tenure is 22 years. Two
contrasting factors greatly influence this 22-year average—the recent
increased changes in auditors lowered the average and the long audit
tenure period associated with approximately 10 percent of Fortune 1000
public companies raised the average. About 20 percent of the Fortune 1000
public companies had their current auditor of record for less than 3 years, a
rate of change in auditors over the last 2 years substantially greater than
the nearly 3 percent annual change rate historically observed.18 This
increased rate of auditor change was driven largely by the recent
dissolution of Arthur Andersen LLP. More than 80 percent of Fortune 1000
public companies that changed auditors over the last 2 years did so to


17
   The Conference Board is a not-for-profit organization that conducts conferences, makes
forecasts and assesses trends, publishes information and analysis, and brings executives
together to learn from one another. The Conference Board formed the commission to
address the circumstances that led to the recent corporate scandals and subsequent decline
of confidence in U.S. capital markets. The commission included former senior federal
government officials, such as a former Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System, former Chairman of the SEC, and former Comptroller General; a state
government official responsible for the state’s retirement system; a former U.S. senator;
various private sector executives holding senior positions of responsibility; and a college
professor.
18
  R. Doogar (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and R. Easley and D. Ricchiute
(University of Notre Dame), “Switching Costs, Audit Firm Market Shares and Merger
Profitability,” (Nov. 20, 2001), which was discussed in GAO-03-864, cited a level of 2.7
percent annual client switching of auditors based on prior research the authors performed
using 1981-1997 Compustat data.




Page 16                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
replace Andersen.19 Increasing the overall average audit tenure period for
Fortune 1000 public companies were the approximately 10 percent of
public companies that had the same auditing firm for more than 50 years
and have an average tenure period of more than 75 years. Excluding those
Fortune 1000 public companies that have replaced Andersen in the last 2
years as well as those companies that had the same auditor of record for
more than 50 years, the average for the remaining Fortune 1000 public
companies is 19 years. See figure 1 for the Fortune 1000 public companies’
estimated audit firm tenure.



Figure 1: Estimated Audit Firm Tenure for Fortune 1000 Public Companies
Percentage
100



 25

           22                    22

 20                 19



 15                                    14


                                                                 10
 10                                             9



     5                                                  4



     0
          1-2      3-10        11-20   21-30   31-40   41-50    50 or
                                                                more
         Years
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



An intended effect of mandatory audit firm rotation is to decrease the
existing lengthy auditor tenure periods, thus lessening concerns about the
firm’s desire to retain a client adversely affecting auditor independence.


19
  The Fortune 1000 public companies that hired a new audit firm to replace Andersen over
the last 2 years reported that Andersen had served as their companies’ auditor of record for
an average of 26 years.




Page 17                                                     GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                             About 97 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies expected that
                             mandatory audit firm rotation would lower the number of consecutive
                             years that a public accounting firm could serve as their auditor of record.
                             The Fortune 1000 public companies were not given a possible limit on the
                             number of years that a public accounting firm could serve as their auditor
                             of record under mandatory audit firm rotation. Therefore, they reported
                             their general belief that mandatory rotation would have the effect of
                             decreasing auditor tenure based on their past experiences.



Impact of Auditor            Since the new auditor’s knowledge and experience with auditing a public
Knowledge and Experience     company after a change in auditors is a concern, we asked public
                             accounting firms and public companies a number of questions about
on the Auditor’s Detection
                             factors important to detecting material misstatements of financial
of Misstatements             statements. Tier 1 firms noted that a number of factors affect the auditor’s
                             ability to detect financial reporting issues that may indicate material
                             misstatements in a public company’s financial statements, including
                             education, training, and experience; knowledge of GAAP and GAAS;
                             experience with the company’s industry; appropriate audit team staffing;
                             effective risk assessment process for determining client acceptance; and
                             knowledge of the client’s operations, systems, and financial reporting
                             practices.20 Although each of the above factors affects the quality of an
                             audit, opponents of mandatory audit firm rotation focus on the increased
                             risk of audit failure that may result from the new auditor’s lack of specific
                             knowledge of the client’s operations, systems, and financial reporting
                             practices. Based on the responses to our survey, we estimated that about
                             95 percent of Tier 1 firms would rate such specific knowledge as either of
                             very great importance or great importance in the auditor’s ability to detect
                             financial reporting issues that may indicate material misstatements in a
                             public company’s financial statements.

                             GAAS require the auditor to obtain a sufficient knowledge of the client’s
                             operations, systems, and financial reporting practices to assess audit risk21
                             and to gather sufficient competent evidential matter. About 79 percent of


                             20
                               Although not specifically listed in our applicable survey question, several Tier 1 firms
                             commented that public company management’s integrity, honesty, and cooperation is of
                             very great or great importance in the auditor’s ability to detect material financial reporting
                             issues.
                             21
                              GAAS define audit risk as the risk that an auditor may unknowingly fail to appropriately
                             modify his or her opinion on financial statements that are materially misstated.




                             Page 18                                                  GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies believed that the risk of an
audit failure is higher in the early years of audit tenure as the new firm is
more likely to not have fully developed and applied an in-depth
understanding of the public company’s operations and processes affecting
financial reporting. More than 83 percent of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000
public companies that expressed a view stated that it generally takes 2 to 3
years or more to become sufficiently familiar with the companies’
operations and processes before the additional resources often needed to
become knowledgeable are no longer needed. Tier 1 firms had mixed
views about whether mandatory audit firm rotation (e.g., the “fresh look”)
would either increase, decrease or have no effect on the new auditor’s
likelihood of detecting financial reporting issues that may materially affect
the financial statements that the previous auditor may not have detected.
However, 50 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies reported that
mandatory audit firm rotation would have no effect on the auditor’s
likelihood of detecting such financial reporting issues, while other Fortune
1000 public companies were generally split regarding whether mandatory
audit firm rotation would either increase or decrease the auditor’s
likelihood of detecting such financial reporting issues.

As shown in figure 2, Tier 1 firms had mixed views of the value of additional
audit procedures during the initial years of a new auditor’s tenure, although
72 percent reported that additional audit procedures would be of at least
some value in helping to reduce audit risk to an acceptable level.




Page 19                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 2: Tier 1 Firms: Value of Additional Procedures When Firm Has Less
Knowledge and Experience with a Client
Value of
additional
procedures

 Very great value              3



       Great value                                         22



  Moderate value                                            22



      Some value                                                  25



Little or no value                                         22



       Don’t know                      6


                     0             5       10   15    20         25        100
                     Percentage
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



Most Fortune 1000 public companies believed such additional audit
procedures would decrease audit risk, as shown in figure 3.




Page 20                                              GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 3: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Belief That Additional or Enhanced Audit
Procedures Would Affect the Risk of Not Detecting Material Misstatements
                                                   3%
                                                   No basis to evaluate

                                7%                 Likely increase risk



                                       24%         Neither increase or decrease risk



               66%                                 Decrease risk




Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



The Tier 1 firms were also asked about the potential value of having
enhanced access to key members of the previous audit team and its audit
documentation to help reduce audit risk. The Tier 1 firms generally saw
more potential value in having enhanced access to the previous audit team
and its audit documentation than in performing additional audit procedures
and verification of the public company’s data during the initial years of the
auditor’s tenure. Nearly all of the Tier 1 firms believed that access to the
previous audit team and its audit documentation could be accomplished
under current GAAS.22




22
   Several Tier 1 firms commented that cooperation of the predecessor public accounting
firm is a barrier to full access of the firm’s audit documentation and indicated that this is an
area that the PCAOB may need to address.




Page 21                                                   GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Pressures Faced by Firms in   Proponents of mandatory audit firm rotation cite that pressures to retain
Dealing with Financial        the client can adversely affect the auditor’s decision to appropriately deal
                              with financial reporting issues when public company management is not
Reporting Issues              supportive of the auditor’s position on what is required by GAAP. They
                              believe that mandatory audit firm rotation would serve as an incentive for
                              the auditor to take the appropriate action since the auditor would know
                              that tenure as auditor of record and the related revenues are for a limited
                              term.23

                              We asked public accounting firms and public companies based on their
                              experiences whether the auditor’s length of tenure is a factor in whether
                              the auditor appropriately deals with material financial reporting issues and
                              whether mandatory audit firm rotation would affect the pressures the firms
                              face. About 69 percent of Tier 1 firms and 73 percent of Fortune 1000
                              public companies do not believe that the risk of an audit failure increases
                              due to the auditors’ long-term relationship with the public companies’
                              management under a long audit tenure and the auditors’ desire to retain the
                              clients. About 55 percent of the other Tier 1 firms24 and 65 percent of the
                              other Fortune 1000 public companies25 were uncertain whether the risk of
                              an audit failure would increase or decrease due to the auditors’ long-term
                              tenure.

                              About 71 percent of Tier 1 firms and 67 percent of Fortune 1000 public
                              companies believe that pressure on the engagement partner to retain the
                              client is currently small or not a factor in whether the auditor appropriately
                              deals with financial reporting issues that may materially affect a public
                              company’s financial statements. However, 28 percent of Tier 1 firms and 33
                              percent of Fortune 1000 public companies believe such pressures are
                              moderate or stronger. About 18 percent of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000
                              public companies believed that under mandatory audit firm rotation, the
                              pressures on the engagement partner would still be a moderate or stronger


                              23
                                Although mandatory audit firm rotation would likely set a limit on the number of
                              consecutive years the public accounting firm could serve as the company’s auditor of
                              record, it may also provide that the business relationship could be terminated by either
                              party during that time.
                              24
                                 The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 41 percent to
                              62 percent.
                              25
                                 The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 51 percent to
                              77 percent.




                              Page 22                                                GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
factor in retaining the audit client and in appropriately dealing with
financial reporting issues. Therefore, based on these views, mandatory
audit firm rotation would likely somewhat reduce the pressures on the
engagement partner to retain the client. However, most Tier 1 firms and
Fortune 1000 public companies generally considered these pressures to be
small or not a factor in the auditor appropriately dealing with material
financial reporting issues.

Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies expressed similar views,
that mandatory audit firm rotation would not significantly change the
pressures on the engagement partner to retain the client as a factor in
whether the engagement partner appropriately challenges overly
aggressive/optimistic financial reporting26 by management.

As shown in figure 4, overall about 54 percent of Tier 1 firms and 71 percent
of Fortune 1000 public companies believe mandatory audit firm rotation
overall would have no effect on the new auditor’s potential for
appropriately dealing with material financial reporting issues.




26
  GAAP are subject to interpretation by public company management and underlying
concepts of GAAP may be applied to transactions of a public company that are not
specifically addressed by GAAP. The auditor may encounter situations in which public
company management aggressively or optimistically applies the concepts of GAAP to
achieve a certain result that arguably may not reflect the economic substance of the
transactions while public company management believes such financial reporting complies
with GAAP.




Page 23                                             GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 4: Views on How Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation Would Affect the Auditor’s
Potential to Deal with Material Financial Reporting Issues Appropriately
Auditor’s potential

                                                        26
            Increase
            potential                             19



     Neither increase                                                          54
         or decrease
             potential                                                                        71



                                                   20
            Decrease
            potential
                                   7


                             N/A
          No basis to
            evaluate           3

                         0          10            20     30        40     50        60   70        80   100
                         Percentage

                                   Tier 1 firms

                                   Fortune 1000 public companies

Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



The remaining Tier 1 firms are split between whether mandatory audit firm
rotation would increase or decrease their potential to appropriately deal
with material financial reporting issues. However, about 67 percent of the
remaining Fortune 1000 public companies believe that mandatory audit
firm rotation would increase the potential for the new auditor to deal
appropriately with such financial reporting issues.27 In contrast, either with
or without mandatory audit firm rotation, about 62 percent of Tier 1 firms
and 63 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies believe the potential of a
subsequent lawsuit, regulatory action, or both against the public
accounting firm and its engagement partner is a moderate or stronger
pressure for them to deal appropriately with financial reporting issues that
may materially affect a public company’s financial statements.




27
  The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 54 percent to 79
percent.




Page 24                                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
How Mandatory Audit Firm    Researchers have also raised questions about how the capital markets’ and
Rotation May Affect         investors’ current perceptions of auditor independence and audit quality
                            would be affected by mandatory audit firm rotation. Under mandatory
Perception of Auditors’     audit firm rotation, about 52 percent of Tier 1 firms and about 62 percent of
Independence                Fortune 1000 public companies believed that the current perception of
                            auditor independence held by capital markets and institutional investors
                            would not be affected by requiring mandatory audit firm rotation while 34
                            percent of Tier 1 firms and about 38 percent of Fortune 1000 public
                            companies believed the perception of auditor independence would
                            increase. However, about 65 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies
                            believed that perception of auditors’ independence held by individual
                            investors would more likely increase under mandatory audit firm rotation
                            while the Tier 1 firms had mixed views on the effect on individual investors.
                            See the Overall Views of Other Knowledgeable Individuals on Mandatory
                            Audit Firm Rotation section of the report for the results of our discussions
                            with other knowledgeable individuals, including institutional investors, for
                            their views on how mandatory audit firm rotation may affect their
                            perception of auditor independence.



How Mandatory Audit Firm    Our research into the effects of mandatory audit firm rotation identified
Rotation May Affect Audit   concerns about whether public accounting firms would move their most
                            knowledgeable and experienced audit personnel from the current audit to
Assignment Staffing
                            other audits as the end of their tenure as auditor of record approached in
                            order to attract or retain other clients. In response to our survey questions
                            about whether mandatory audit firm rotation would affect assignment of
                            audit staff, about 59 percent of Tier 1 firms indicated that they would likely
                            move their most knowledgeable and experienced audit staff to other work
                            to enhance the firm’s ability to attract or retain other clients and another 28
                            percent were undecided. Only about 13 percent of Tier 1 firms stated it was
                            unlikely that an accounting firm would move staff to other work. Of the
                            Tier 1 firms that stated they would likely move their most knowledgeable
                            and experienced staff, 86 percent28 believe that moving these staff would
                            increase the risk of an audit failure. About 92 percent of Fortune 1000
                            public companies also believed that by moving these audit staff, the risk of
                            an audit failure would be increased.



                            28
                              The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 77 percent to 90
                            percent.




                            Page 25                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
How Mandatory Audit Firm       Opponents of mandatory audit firm rotation expressed concern that limited
Rotation May Affect Public     audit tenure under mandatory rotation could cause public accounting firms
                               to not invest in audit tools related to the effectiveness of auditing a specific
Accounting Firms’              client or industry. About 76 percent of Tier 1 firms stated that their average
Investment in Audit Tools      audit tenure would likely decrease under mandatory audit firm rotation,
                               and about 97 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies expected the
                               length of their auditors’ tenure would decrease compared to their previous
                               experience with changing auditors. In response to our survey questions
                               about this possibility, about 64 percent of these Tier 1 firms said mandatory
                               audit firm rotation would not likely decrease incentives to invest the
                               resources needed to understand the client’s operations and financial
                               reporting practices in order to devise effective audit procedures and tools,
                               while 36 percent said it would. Conversely, about 67 percent of Fortune
                               1000 public companies were concerned that mandatory audit firm rotation
                               could negatively affect incentives for public accounting firms to invest in
                               effective audit procedures and tools.



How Mandatory Audit Firm       Currently, when a change in the auditor of record occurs it acts as a “red
Rotation May Affect the        flag” signal to investors to question why the change occurred and if the
                               change may have occurred because of reasons related to the presentation
Current “Red Flag” Signal to   of the public company’s financial statements, such as differences in views
Investors When a Change in     of public company management and the auditor of record regarding
a Public Company’s Auditor     financial reporting issues. Researchers have raised concerns that the “red
of Record Occurs               flag” signal may be eliminated by mandatory audit firm rotation, as
                               investors may not be able to distinguish a scheduled change from a
                               nonscheduled change in a public company’s auditor of record.

                               Regarding the “red flag” signal, most Tier 1 firms believed that mandatory
                               audit firm rotation would not change the current reaction by investors to a
                               change in the auditor of record, and therefore a “red flag” signal is likely to
                               be perceived by investors for both scheduled and unscheduled changes in
                               the public company’s auditor of record. Several Tier 1 firms commented
                               that users of financial statements would not be able to readily track
                               scheduled rotations and therefore would be confused whether the change
                               in auditors was scheduled or unscheduled. In contrast, most Fortune 1000
                               public companies believed that scheduled auditor changes under
                               mandatory audit firm rotation would likely not produce a “red flag” signal
                               and that the “red flag” signal for unscheduled changes in the auditor of
                               record would be retained. Fortune 1000 public companies did not provide
                               any comments to further explain their beliefs. However, currently, public



                               Page 26                                         GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                             companies are required by SEC regulations to report changes in their
                             auditor of record to the SEC. Therefore, public companies could use this
                             reporting requirement to disclose whether the change in auditor of record
                             under mandatory audit firm rotation was scheduled or unscheduled.



Potential Impact on Audit-   Opponents of mandatory audit firm rotation believe that the more frequent
Related Costs and Fees       change in auditors likely to occur under mandatory audit firm rotation will
                             result in the public accounting firms and ultimately public companies
                             incurring increased costs for audits of financial statements. These costs
                             include

                             • marketing costs (the costs incurred by public accounting firms related
                               to their efforts to acquire or retain financial statement audit clients),

                             • audit costs (the costs incurred by a public accounting firm to perform an
                               audit of a public company’s financial statements),

                             • audit fee (the amount a public accounting firm charges the public
                               company to perform the financial statement audit),

                             • selection costs (the internal costs incurred by a public company in
                               selecting a new public accounting firm as the public company’s auditor
                               of record), and

                             • support costs (the internal costs incurred by a public company in
                               supporting the public accounting firm’s efforts to understand the public
                               company’s operations, systems, and financial reporting practices).

                             About 96 percent of Tier 1 firms stated that their initial year audit costs are
                             likely to be more than in subsequent years in order to acquire the necessary
                             knowledge during a first year audit of a public company’s operations,
                             systems, and financial reporting practices. Nearly all of these Tier 1 firms
                             estimated initial year audit costs would be more than 20 percent higher
                             than subsequent years’ costs.29 Similar responses were received from
                             Fortune 1000 public companies. (See fig. 5.)



                             29
                               Several Tier 1 firms commented that mandatory audit firm rotation could also result in
                             costs to relocate staff given the unpredictability of where new audit clients would be located
                             and increased costs for education and training of staff.




                             Page 27                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 5: Expected Increase in Initial Year Audit Costs over Subsequent Year Audit
Costs
Increase in initial
year audit costs
                                                                20
   More than 50 percent
                                                 10

                                                     11
   More than 40 percent
but less than 50 percent                         10


   More than 30 percent                                              23
but less than 40 percent                                       19


   More than 20 percent                                               24
but less than 30 percent                                                                         49


   More than 10 percent                     7
but less than 20 percent                         10


                                  1
       10 percent or less
                                      2

                                                          14
 No basis or experience
                                  N/A

                              0                 10             20           30        40         50     100
                              Percentage

                                          Fortune 1000 public companies

                                          Tier 1 firms

Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



About 85 percent of Tier 1 firms stated that currently they are more likely
to absorb their higher initial year audit costs than to pass them on to the
public companies in the form of higher audit fees because of the firms’
interest in retaining the audit client. However, about 87 percent said such
costs would likely be passed on to the public companies during the more
limited audit firm tenure period under mandatory rotation. Similarly, about
77 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies stated that currently when a
change in the companies’ auditor of record occurs, the additional initial
year audit costs are likely to be absorbed by the public accounting firms.
However, about 97 percent of the Fortune 1000 public companies expected
the higher initial year audit costs would be passed on to them under
mandatory audit firm rotation.



Page 28                                                                    GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Comments received from a number of the Tier 1 firms indicated that
currently initial years’ audit costs are recovered from the public companies
over the firms’ tenure as auditor of record. However, the firms under
mandatory audit firm rotation expected not to be able to recover the costs
within a more limited tenure as auditor of record. Therefore, they would
pass the costs on to the public companies through higher audit fees.
Similarly, about 89 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies believed that
mandatory audit firm rotation would lead to higher audit fees over time. 30

With the likely more frequent opportunities to compete for providing audit
services to public companies under mandatory audit firm rotation, about 79
percent of Tier 1 firms expect to incur increased marketing costs
associated with their efforts to acquire audit clients, and about 79 percent
of the Tier 1 firms expect to pass these costs on to the public companies
through higher audit fees.

As shown in figure 6, most of the Tier 1 firms expecting higher marketing
costs estimated that the cost would add at least more than 1 percent to
their initial year audit fees, and about 37 percent of these Tier 1 firms31
believed their additional marketing costs would be more than 10 percent of
their initial year audit fees.




30
  Many Fortune 1000 public companies commented that mandatory audit firm rotation
would lead to higher audit fees as the public accounting firms would want to recoup their
additional costs within the limited time as auditor of record that would be established under
mandatory audit firm rotation. Also, they stated there would be no incentive for the public
accounting firms to absorb the additional costs since mandatory audit firm rotation would
preclude long-term business relationships as the auditor of record.
31
  The 95 percent confidence interval for the estimate of these Tier 1 firms that expect more
than a 10 percent increase ranges from 29 percent to 45 percent. Also, as shown in figure 6,
the 95 percent confidence interval for the estimate of Tier 1 firms who have no basis or
experience to estimate what their increase would be ranges from 15 percent to 27 percent.




Page 29                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 6: Tier 1 Firms Expecting Additional Expected Marketing Costs under
Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation Compared to Initial Year Audit Fees
                                               2%
                                               Less than 1 percent

                                   12%         More than 1 percent


         37%                             19%   No basis or experience



                                               More than 5 percent
                        30%
                                               More than 10 percent



Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



A number of Tier 1 firms commented that they would have to spend more
time marketing auditing services, including writing new proposals to
compete for audit services. About 85 percent of Fortune 1000 public
companies expected that public accounting firms would likely incur
additional marketing costs under mandatory audit firm rotation, and about
92 percent of these Fortune 1000 public companies believed the costs
would be passed on to them.

In addition to higher audit fees, nearly all Fortune 1000 public companies
believed they would incur selection costs in hiring a new auditor of record
under mandatory audit firm rotation. As shown in figure 7, most of those
Fortune 1000 public companies expected the selection costs to be at least 6
percent or higher as a percentage of initial year audit fees.




Page 30                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 7: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Expected Selection Costs as a
Percentage of Initial Year Audit Fees
Likely selection costs

      20 percent or more                                      14


   More than 15 percent
but less than 20 percent                       8


   More than 10 percent
but less than 15 percent                                                   20


    More than 5 percent
but less than 10 percent                                                          23


     Less than 5 percent                                                          23



                      None         1



        No basis to know                                11

                             0             5       10         15          20           25   100

                              Percentage
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



In addition, nearly all Fortune 1000 public companies expected to incur
some additional initial year auditor support costs under mandatory audit
firm rotation. As shown in figure 8, nearly all of those Fortune 1000 public
companies believed their additional support costs would be 11 percent or
higher as a percentage of initial year audit fees.




Page 31                                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Figure 8: Fortune 1000 Public Companies’ Expected Support Costs as a Percentage
of Initial Year Audit Fees
Support costs

      50 percent or more                                    11


   More than 40 percent
                                                       8
but less than 50 percent

   More than 30 percent
                                                                        17
but less than 40 percent

   More than 20 percent
                                                                                              28
but less than 30 percent


   More than 10 percent
                                                                                    23
but less than 20 percent


    Less than 10 percent                       5



    No basis to estimate                           8

                              0            5           10        15          20          25        30   100
                              Percentage
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.



Tier 1 firms’ views on the likelihood of public companies incurring
selection costs and additional auditor support costs were similar to the
views of Fortune 1000 public companies.

To provide some perspective on the possible impact of higher audit-related
costs (audit fees, company selection, and support cost) on public company
operating costs, we analyzed financial reports filed with the SEC for a
selection of large and small public companies for the most recent fiscal
year available—one of each from 23 broad industry sectors, such as
agriculture, manufacturing, and information services. Where available, for
each industry sector, we selected a public company with annual revenues
of more than $5 billion and a public company with annual revenues of less
than $1 billion. The audit fees reported by the larger public companies we
selected ranged from .007 percent to .11 percent of total operating costs




Page 32                                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                      and averaged .04 percent. The audit fees reported by the smaller public
                      companies we selected ranged from 0.017 percent to 3.0 percent and
                      averaged 0.08 percent.32

                      Utilizing the predominant responses33 from Tier 1 firms, we estimate the
                      additional first year audit costs following a change in auditor to likely range
                      from 21 percent to 39 percent more than annual costs of recurring audits of
                      the same client. In addition, we estimate the additional firm marketing
                      costs under mandatory audit firm rotation to likely range from 6 percent to
                      11 percent of the firm’s initial year audit fees. Based on the predominant
                      responses from Fortune 1000 public companies, we also estimate the
                      additional public company selection costs to range from 1 percent to 14
                      percent of the new auditor’s initial year audit fees and possible additional
                      public company support costs to range from 11 percent to 39 percent of the
                      new auditor’s initial year audit fees. Utilizing these ranges, we estimate that
                      following a change in auditor under mandatory audit firm rotation, the
                      possible additional first year audit-related costs could range from 43
                      percent to 128 percent higher than the likely recurring audit costs had there
                      been no change in auditor. We also calculated a weighted average
                      percentage for each additional cost category using all responses from Tier
                      1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies (as opposed to the predominant
                      responses only). Using the resulting weighted averages for all responses,
                      we calculated the potential additional first year audit-related costs to be
                      102 percent higher than the likely recurring audit costs had there been no
                      change in auditor. This illustration is intended only to provide insights into
                      how Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies reported that
                      mandatory audit firm rotation could affect the initial year audit costs and is
                      not intended to be representative.



Competition-Related   Although mandatory audit firm rotation is generally considered by its
                      proponents as a means of enhancing auditor independence and audit
Issues                quality, mandatory rotation may also provide increased opportunities for


                      32
                        The public company annual reports for the most recent fiscal year available (either 2002
                      or 2003) did not disclose any auditor selection or support costs that the companies may
                      have incurred.
                      33
                        We established the various ranges used for this analysis based on our analysis of the
                      responses from Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies. In establishing the ranges,
                      we used survey responses consisting of the predominant responses (at least 68 percent) of
                      those received.




                      Page 33                                                GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
some public accounting firms to compete to provide audit services to
public companies. About 52 percent of Tier 1 firms believed that
mandatory audit firm rotation would increase the opportunity to compete
for public company audits and 30 percent were uncertain whether
opportunities to compete to provide audit services would increase or
decrease.

However, when asked how mandatory audit firm rotation would likely
affect the number of firms actually willing and able to compete for public
company audits, about 54 percent of Tier 1 firms said mandatory rotation
would likely decrease the number of firms competing for audits of public
companies, 14 percent expected an increase in the number of firms, and 22
percent expected no effect on the number of firms competing.

Although nearly all Tier 1 firms planned to register with the PCAOB to
provide audit services to public companies,34 about 24 percent of Tier 1
firms that currently provide audit services were uncertain whether they
would continue to provide audit services to public companies if mandatory
audit firm rotation were required.35 Firms in Tier 2 that responded to our
survey showed more uncertainty regarding whether to register with the
PCAOB, with about two-thirds planning to continue to provide audit
services to public companies and most of the remaining respondents
uncertain if they would continue to provide audit services to public
companies.36 However, if mandatory audit firm rotation were required, 55
percent of the Tier 2 firms that responded to our survey that currently
provide audit services to public companies were uncertain whether they
would continue to provide the audit services to public companies, and
another 12 percent said they would discontinue providing audit services to
public companies.37



34
  As of October 22, 2003, 89 percent of those Tier 1 firms that responded to our survey have
registered with the PCAOB or have applications pending.
35
  In total, these Tier 1 firms that were uncertain whether they would continue to provide
audit services to public companies if mandatory audit firm rotation were required audit 586
public companies.
36
  As of October 22, 2003, 80 percent of these Tier 2 firms that responded to our survey have
registered with the PCAOB or have applications pending.
37
  In total, these Tier 2 firms that would discontinue providing audit services to public
companies if mandatory audit firm rotation were required audit 154 public companies.




Page 34                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
The view of many Tier 1 firms that mandatory audit firm rotation may lead
to fewer firms willing and able to compete for public company audits,
which would lead to higher audit fees, should also be considered along
with the results of our study of consolidation of the Big 8 firms into the
current Big 4 firms.38 In that respect, we previously reported that the Big 4
audit over 78 percent of all U.S. public companies and 99 percent of public
company annual sales. However, we found no empirical evidence of
impaired competition. Further, we previously reported that smaller public
accounting firms were unable to successfully compete for the audits of
large national and multinational public companies because of factors such
as lack of capacity and capital limitations.39

About 83 percent of Tier 1 firms and 66 percent of Fortune 1000 public
companies stated that under mandatory audit firm rotation, the market
share of public company audits would either become more concentrated in
a small number of larger public accounting firms or the already highly
concentrated market share would remain about the same. About 44
percent of Tier 1 firms believed that incentives to create or maintain large
firms would be increased while 32 percent believed mandatory audit firm
rotation would have no effect on incentives to create or maintain large
firms.

About 52 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies were at least
somewhat concerned that the dissolution of Arthur Andersen LLP, resulting
now in the Big 4 public accounting firms, would significantly limit the
options their companies have in selecting a capable auditor of record.
Under mandatory audit firm rotation, the number of Fortune 1000 public
companies expressing such concern increased to 79 percent.

About 48 percent of Tier 1 firms believed mandatory audit firm rotation
would decrease the number of firms willing and able to compete for audits
of public companies in specialized industries, while 29 percent of Tier 1
firms believed mandatory audit firm rotation would have no effect. As
noted in our July 2003 report, we found that in certain specialized
industries, the number of firms with expertise in auditing those industries


38
     GAO-03-864.
39
  A number of Tier 1 firms responding to our survey on mandatory audit firm rotation
commented that the increased costs likely to be incurred by the firms under mandatory
audit firm rotation could result in many smaller firms being unable to compete or absorb the
increased costs, resulting in smaller firms leaving the market for providing audit services.




Page 35                                                GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
can limit the number of choices such public companies have to two public
accounting firms. Contributing to this situation is that many public
companies will use only Big 4 firms for audit services. Also, public
companies may have fewer choices in the future as auditor independence
rules under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act prohibiting the auditor of record from
also providing certain nonaudit services could further reduce the number
of eligible auditors. In that respect, mandatory audit firm rotation would
further affect the number of eligible auditors. For example, if a public
company in a specialized industry has only three or four choices for its
auditor of record, the current auditor of record is not eligible to repeat as
auditor of record under mandatory audit firm rotation, and another firm is
not eligible because it provided prohibited nonaudit services that affect
auditor independence to the public company, then the number of eligible
firms would be reduced to one or two firms.

About 35 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies were at least
somewhat concerned that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act auditor independence
requirements would significantly limit their options in selecting a capable
auditor of record. However, 53 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies
expressed such concern if mandatory audit firm rotation were required.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires the audit committee to hire, compensate,
and oversee the public accounting firm serving as auditor of record for the
public company. About 92 percent of the Fortune 1000 audit committee
chairs stated that their public companies currently use Big 4 firms as
auditor of record, and 94 percent of those that do stated that they would
not realistically consider using non-Big 4 firms as the public companies’
auditor of record. Table 1 provides reasons given by the audit committee
chairs for only using Big 4 firms and the importance of those reasons to
them.




Page 36                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Table 1: Audit Committee Chairs’ Reasons for Limiting Consideration to Only Big 4 Firms

Numbers in percentages
Reasons for limiting consideration to only Big 4           Very great     Great   Moderate        Some      Little or no   Don’t
firms                                                     importance importance importance   importance    importance      know
Expectations of the capital markets                              48         34          14             1              3       0
Public company geographic/global operations                      53         27          10             4              6       0
Public company operations require specialized
industry skills/knowledge                                        39         36          18             6              1       0
Public company contractual obligations (e.g. with
banks or lenders)                                                15         28          25             5             20       7
Requirement of the public company’s board of
directors                                                        23         35          19             7             13       3
Sufficiency of audit firm resources                              68         26           4             2              0       0
Audit firm’s name and reputation                                 35         41          18             4              2       0
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.


                                                Although the Sarbanes-Oxley Act now makes the audit committee
                                                responsible for hiring the public company’s auditor of record, 96 percent of
                                                Fortune 1000 public companies currently using Big 4 firms also stated that
                                                they would not realistically consider using non-Big 4 firms as the
                                                companies’ auditor of record. They generally gave the same reasons as the
                                                audit committee chairs.



Overall Views on                                In our surveys, we asked public accounting firms, public companies, and
                                                their audit committee chairs to provide their overall views on the potential
Mandatory Audit Firm                            costs and benefits that may result under mandatory audit firm rotation.
Rotation                                        About 85 percent of Tier 1 firms, 92 percent of Fortune 1000 public
                                                companies, and 89 percent of Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs
                                                believed that costs are likely to exceed benefits.

                                                Our surveys also requested views whether the Sarbanes-Oxley Act auditor
                                                independence and related audit quality requirements could also achieve the
                                                intended benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation. The act, as
                                                implemented by SEC rules, requires the mandatory rotation of both lead
                                                and reviewing audit engagement partners after 5 years and after 7 years for
                                                other partners with significant involvement in the audit engagement. Other
                                                related provisions of the act concerning auditor independence and audit
                                                quality include prohibiting the auditor of record from also providing certain
                                                nonaudit services, requiring audit committee preapproval of audit and



                                                Page 37                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
nonaudit services not otherwise prohibited and related public disclosures,
establishing certain auditor reporting requirements to the audit committee,
requiring time restrictions before certain auditors could be hired by the
client as employees, expanding audit committee responsibilities, and
establishing the PCAOB as an independent nongovernmental entity
overseeing registered public accounting firms in the audit of public
companies.

About 66 percent of Tier 1 firms believe the audit partner rotation
requirements sufficiently achieve the intended benefits of a “fresh look” of
mandatory audit firm rotation. Another 27 percent of the Tier 1 firms
believe that the audit partner rotation requirements may not be as effective
as mandatory audit firm rotation in achieving the intended benefits of a
“fresh look,” but is a better choice given the higher cost of mandatory audit
firm rotation. Fortune 1000 public companies and audit committee chairs
responding to our survey expressed similar views.

We asked those Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies and their
audit committee chairs who did not believe that the partner rotation
requirement by itself sufficiently achieved the intended benefits of
mandatory audit firm rotation to consider the auditor independence, audit
quality, and partner rotation requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as
implemented by SEC rules and their views on whether these requirements
in total would likely achieve the intended benefits of mandatory audit firm
rotation when fully implemented. About 25 percent40 of these Tier 1 firms
believed these requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, when fully
implemented, would sufficiently achieve the intended benefits of
mandatory audit firm rotation, while 63 percent41 believed these
requirements would only somewhat or minimally achieve the intended
benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation when fully implemented.
Conversely, 76 percent42 of Fortune 1000 public companies and 72 percent43


40
  The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 17 percent to 39
percent.
41
  The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 48 percent to 72
percent.
42
  The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 62 percent to 86
percent.
43
  The 95 percent confidence interval surrounding this estimate ranges from 58 percent to 84
percent.




Page 38                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
of their audit committee chairs believed these requirements would
sufficiently achieve the intended benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation.
Combining the responses to the above two questions for those who
believed either the partner rotation requirements or the partner rotation
requirements coupled with the other Sarbanes-Oxley Act auditor
independence and audit quality requirements would sufficiently achieve
the benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation shows that about 75 percent
of the Tier 1 firms, 95 percent of Fortune 1000 public companies, and about
92 percent of the audit committee chairs believe these requirements, when
fully implemented, would sufficiently achieve the benefits of mandatory
audit firm rotation.

Most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies and their audit
committee chairs believe the Sarbanes-Oxley Act auditor independence
and audit quality requirements, when fully implemented, would sufficiently
achieve the benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation, and most of these
groups when asked their overall opinion on mandatory audit firm rotation
did not support mandatory rotation.44 A minority within these groups
supports the concept of mandatory audit firm rotation, but believes more
time is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the various Sarbanes-Oxley
Act requirements for enhancing auditor independence and audit quality.
(See fig. 9.)




44
  Comments from a number of the Tier 1 firms primarily reiterated their previously stated
views regarding the costs and benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation and that the SEC’s
recent audit partner rotation requirements better balance the need for a “fresh look” without
eliminating the auditor of record’s institutional knowledge of the client. They also reiterated
that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act should be given time to work and rebuild investors’ confidence.
Similar comments were received from many of the Fortune 1000 public companies’ chief
financial officers and their audit committee chairs who also stressed the additional costs of
mandatory audit firm rotation.




Page 39                                                  GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                         Figure 9: Support for Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation
                         Percentage
                         100

                                                                                        88   90
                          90

                          80                                                     76

                          70

                          60

                          50

                          40

                          30

                          20                                  17

                          10       7                                8     7
                                          4
                                                  2                                                 0           1
                                                                                                          0
                              0
                                       Supports              Supports concept         Does not          Other
                                                              but more time is        support
                                                                needed with
                                                              Sarbanes-Oxley
                                                               requirements
                                  Support for mandatory audit firm rotation

                                              Tier 1 firms

                                              Fortune 1000 public companies
                                              Fortune 1000 audit committees

                         Source: GAO analysis of survey data.




Overall Views of Other   As part of our review, we spoke to a number of knowledgeable individuals
                         to obtain their views on mandatory audit firm rotation to provide additional
Knowledgeable            perspective on issues addressed in the survey. These individuals had
Individuals on           experience in a variety of fields, such as institutional investment; regulation
                         of the stock markets, the banking industry, and the accounting profession;
Mandatory Audit Firm     and consumer advocacy. Generally, the views expressed by these
Rotation                 knowledgeable individuals were consistent with the overall views
                         expressed by survey respondents.45 Most did not favor implementing a
                         requirement for mandatory audit firm rotation at this time because they


                         45
                          SEC and PCAOB officials informed us that they have not taken a position on the merits of
                         mandatory audit firm rotation.




                         Page 40                                                                  GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
believe the costs of implementing such a requirement outweigh the benefits
and greater experience with implementing the requirements of the
Sarbanes-Oxley Act should be gained prior to adding new requirements.

Many individuals acknowledged that conceptually, audit firm rotation
could provide certain benefits in the areas of auditor independence and
audit quality. For example, audit firm rotation may increase the perception
of auditor independence because long-term relationships between the
auditor of record and the client that could undermine independence would
not likely develop under the limited term as auditor of record. Some
individuals also believe that under mandatory audit firm rotation, the
auditor might be less likely to succumb to management pressure to accept
questionable accounting practices because the incentive to keep the client
is gone and another audit firm would be looking at the firm’s work in the
future. Some also believed that audit quality may also be increased through
a change in auditors because a new auditor of record would provide a
"fresh look" at an entity’s financial reporting practices and accounting
policies. In addition, some individuals noted that mandatory audit firm
rotation might cause a company to reexamine its audit needs and seek
more knowledgeable and experienced audit firm personnel when
negotiating for a new auditor of record.

The individuals we spoke to, however, acknowledged a number of practical
concerns related to mandatory audit firm rotation, one of the most
important being the limited number of audit firms available from which to
choose. For example, some companies, especially those with
geographically diverse operations or those operating in certain industries,
may be somewhat limited in the choice of auditing firms capable of
performing the audit. Not all audit firms have offices or staff located in all
the geographic areas, whether domestically or internationally, where the
clients conduct their operations, nor do all audit firms have personnel with
certain industry knowledge to be able to perform audits of clients that
operate in specific environments.

Similar to the views of Fortune 1000 public companies and audit committee
chairs, individuals we spoke to noted that large companies are often
limited to choices among the Big 4 firms. In some cases, the choices are
further restricted because the accounting profession has become
segmented by industry, and a lack of industry-specific knowledge may
preclude some firms from performing the audits. For a company that is
limited to use of Big 4 firms, it was viewed that selection may also be
restricted because an audit firm providing certain nonaudit services or



Page 41                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
serving as a company’s internal auditor is prohibited by independence rules
from also serving as that company’s auditor of record. In some cases, a
company may also be limited in its choice of firms if an audit firm audits
one of the company’s major competitors and the public company decides
not to use that firm as its auditor of record.

With regard to the use of a Big 4 firm, some individuals believe that
although a new auditor provides a "fresh look" at an audit engagement, the
Big 4 audit firms have somewhat similar cultures and methodologies for
performing audits, and as a result, the benefit of a "fresh look" is more
limited today than it was in the past when the firms had different cultures
and employed a greater variety of methodologies.

Many individuals we spoke with also noted that when a change in auditor
of record occurs, a learning curve, which can last a year or more, exists
while the new auditor becomes familiar with the client’s operations, thus
increasing the audit risk associated with the engagement. Although a new
auditor provides a "fresh look" for the audit, concern was raised that a new
auditor may challenge the previous auditor’s judgments in an overly
aggressive manner because the new auditor is not familiar with the client’s
operations or accounting policies, and this poses a problem for the public
company because the previous auditor is not present to explain the
rationale for those judgments. It was viewed that in some cases, these are
matters of professional judgment rather than actual errors and that such a
situation could result in increased tension between the client and new
auditor of record.

Some individuals we spoke with expressed concern that if mandatory audit
firm rotation were implemented, the audit firm may rotate its most
qualified staff off the engagement during the later years of audit tenure
because the audit firm might focus its resources on obtaining or providing
services to new clients. These individuals believe that such a practice
would increase audit risk, as did most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public
companies. Some individuals also expressed concern that toward the end
of audit tenure, an audit firm might shift its attention to marketing nonaudit
services the firm could provide when it was no longer the auditor of record,
which may be counter to the intended benefits of mandatory audit firm
rotation.

Individuals we spoke with also noted other implementation issues with
mandatory audit firm rotation. For example, they viewed mandatory audit
firm rotation as increasing costs to a company, not only in terms of higher



Page 42                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
audit fees but also in additional selection and support costs. In particular,
many individuals we spoke with, as did most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000
public companies, believed that when a company rotates auditors, a certain
amount of disruption occurs and the company spends a significant amount
of resources—both financial and human—educating the new auditor about
company operations and accounting matters. Individuals we spoke with
expressed concern not only that these additional audit, selection, and
support costs are ultimately passed on to shareholders but also that audit
committees may lose control of selecting the best auditors to provide the
best quality to shareholders since the incumbent firm would not be eligible
to compete to provide audit services for some period of time.

Some individuals we spoke with noted that they have already observed a
heightened sense of corporate responsibility and better corporate
governance as a result of a change in behavior brought about by the large
corporate failures in recent years. Overall, the majority of knowledgeable
individuals we spoke with believe that a requirement for mandatory audit
firm rotation should not be implemented at this time.46 However, some
individuals suggested that regulators could require a change in the auditor
of record as an enforcement action if conditions warrant such a measure.
Most individuals we spoke with believe that the cost of requiring
mandatory audit firm rotation would exceed the benefits because of the
various practical concerns noted. Rather, these individuals believe that
greater experience with the existing provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act
should be gained and the results assessed before the need for the
mandatory audit firm rotation is considered. Many individuals we spoke
with believe that individual Sarbanes-Oxley Act provisions, such as audit
firm partner rotation and the increased responsibilities of the audit
committee, are not a substitute for mandatory audit firm rotation, but taken
collectively, they could accomplish many of the same intended benefits of
mandatory audit firm rotation to improve auditor independence and audit
quality. For example, some individuals believe that the existing Sarbanes-
Oxley Act provisions related to audit committees have already resulted in
more time spent on audit committee activities and greater contact and
frequency of meetings with auditors. These individuals commented that
audit committees now ask more questions of auditors because of a

46
  Individuals we spoke with that generally supported mandatory audit firm rotation
included representatives of entities that currently have mandatory audit firm rotation
policies, a consumer advocacy group, two individuals associated with oversight of the
accounting profession, an individual knowledgeable in the regulation of public companies,
and an expert in corporate governance.




Page 43                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                         heightened sense of accountability for the performance, accuracy,
                         reliability, and integrity of everything the independent auditors are doing.



Survey Groups Views      If mandatory audit firm rotation were required a number of implementing
                         factors affecting the structure of the requirement would need to be decided
on Implementing          by policy makers (e.g., the Congress and regulators). The following
Mandatory Audit Firm     provides the views of Tier 1 firms, Fortune 1000 public companies, and
                         their audit committee chairs on certain implementing factors, regardless of
Rotation if Required     whether they supported mandatory audit firm rotation.
and Other Alternatives
for Enhancing Audit      • Most believed that the auditor of record’s tenure should be limited to
                           either 5 to 7 years or 8 to 10 years.
Quality
                         • Nearly all believed that when the incumbent auditor of record is
                           replaced, the public accounting firm should not be permitted to compete
                           for audit services for either 3 or 4 years or 5 to 7 years.

                         • Nearly all believed that the audit committee should be permitted to
                           terminate the business relationship with the auditor of record at any
                           time if it is dissatisfied with the firm’s performance. Likewise, most
                           believed that the public accounting firm should be able to terminate its
                           relationship with the audit committee/public company at any time if it is
                           dissatisfied with the working relationship.

                         • Nearly all believed that implementation of mandatory audit firm rotation
                           should be staggered on a reasonable basis to avoid a significant number
                           of public companies changing auditors simultaneously.

                         • Most Tier 1 firms believed that mandatory audit firm rotation should not
                           be applied uniformly to all public companies regardless of their nature
                           or size. In contrast, most Fortune 1000 public companies and their audit
                           committee chairs believed mandatory audit firm rotation should be
                           applied to all public companies regardless of nature or size. However,
                           most other domestic and mutual fund companies that responded to our
                           survey believed mandatory audit firm rotation should not be applied
                           uniformly, and their audit committee chairs who responded to our
                           survey were split on the subject.

                         • The Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs who believed
                           that mandatory audit firm rotation should not be applied uniformly
                           more frequently selected the larger public companies rather than the



                         Page 44                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
   smaller public companies to be subject to mandatory audit firm rotation.
   However, Fortune 1000 public companies were divided on their
   selection of sizes of public companies that should be subject to
   mandatory audit firm rotation.

See appendix II for additional details of the responses.

Our research of studies, other documents, and survey development
activities concerning issues related to mandatory audit firm rotation
identified the following other practices for potentially enhancing auditor
independence and audit quality:

• the audit committee periodically holding an open competition for
  providing audit services,

• requiring audit managers to periodically rotate off the engagement for
  providing audit services to the public company,

• the audit committee periodically obtaining the services of a public
  accounting firm to assist it in overseeing the financial statement audit or
  to conduct a forensic audit in areas of the public company’s financial
  statement process that present a risk of fraudulent financial reporting,
  and

• the audit committee hiring the auditor of record on a noncancelable
  multiyear basis in which only the public accounting firm could
  terminate the business relationship for cause during the contract period.

Although many Tier 1 firms, Fortune 1000 public companies, and their audit
committee chairs saw some benefit in each of the alternative practices, in
general, they most frequently reported that the alternative practices would
have limited or little benefit. The most notable exception involved the
practice in which an audit committee would hire an auditor of record on a
noncancelable multiyear basis, for which most Fortune 1000 public
companies and their audit committee chairs reported that the practice
would have no benefit. (See table 5 in app. III.)

Regarding practices other than mandatory audit firm rotation that may
have potential value to enhance auditor independence and audit quality, the
Sarbanes-Oxley Act provides the PCAOB with the authority to set auditing
and related attestation, ethics, independence, and quality control standards
for registered public accounting firms and for conducting inspections to



Page 45                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                         determine compliance of each registered public accounting firm with the
                         rules of the PCAOB, the SEC, or professional standards in connection with
                         the performance of audits, the issuance of audit reports, and related
                         matters involving public companies. In that respect, the PCAOB’s
                         inspection program for registered public accounting firms could also
                         provide the PCAOB with the opportunity to provide a “fresh look” at the
                         auditor of record’s performance regarding auditor independence and audit
                         quality. For example, the inspections could include factors potentially
                         affecting auditor independence, such as length of the auditor’s tenure,
                         partners or managers of the audit firm who recently left the firm and are
                         now employed by the public company in financial reporting roles, and
                         nonaudit services provided by the auditor of record, as suggested by the
                         Conference Board Commission on Public Trust and Private Enterprise in
                         its January 9, 2003, report. Also, the inspections could consider the
                         auditor’s work in high-risk areas of the public company’s operations and
                         related financial reporting. Further, the inspections can serve to provide
                         some degree of transparency of their overall results and enforcement of
                         PCAOB and SEC requirements that may be useful for audit committees to
                         consider.



Auditor Experience in    With the dissolution of Arthur Andersen LLP in 2002, Tier 1 firms reported
                         replacing Anderson, as auditor of record, for more than 1,200 public
Restatements of annual   company clients since December 31, 2001. Such volume of change in
Financial Statements     auditors provided an unprecedented opportunity to gain some actual
                         experience with the potential value of the “fresh look” provided by a new
Filed with the SEC for   auditor. Since many of these public companies had to replace Andersen as
2001 and 2002            their auditor of record during 2002, the number of changes in their auditor
                         of record effectively represented a partial form of mandatory audit firm
                         rotation. We identified all annual restatements of financial statements filed
                         on a Form 10-KA and any annual restatements included in an annual Form
                         10K filing with the SEC by Fortune 1000 public companies for 2001 and
                         2002 through August 31, 2003, and focused on which restatements were
                         attributable to errors or fraud where the previous financial statements did
                         not comply with GAAP and identified whether there was a change in the
                         auditor of record.

                         We found that 28, or 2.9 percent, of the 960 Fortune 1000 public companies
                         changed their auditor of record during 2001, and 204, or 21.3 percent, of the
                         companies changed their auditor during 2002. The significant increase
                         from 2001 through 2002 was primarily due to the dissolution of Andersen.
                         Our analysis showed that the Fortune 1000 public companies filed 43



                         Page 46                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
restatements during those 2 years that were due to errors or fraud. The
financial statements affected ranged from years 1997 to 2002. The
misstatement rates of these public companies’ previously issued
statements of net income ranged from a 6.7 percent overstatement of net
income for 2000 to a 37.0 percent understatement of net loss for 2001.

The restatement rates due to errors or fraud among the 43 Fortune 1000
public companies that changed their auditor of record were 10.7 percent in
2001 and 3.9 percent in 2002 compared to restatement rates of 2.5 percent
in 2001 and 1.2 percent in 2002 for companies that did not change auditors.
Although the data indicate that the overall restatement rate is
approximately 4.5 times higher for 2001 and 3.25 times higher for 2002 for
the companies that changed their auditor of record as compared to those
companies that did not change auditors, caution should be taken as further
analysis would be needed to determine whether the restatements are
associated with the “fresh look” attributed to mandatory audit firm
rotation. In that respect, for the majority of the restatements, the public
information filed with the SEC and included in the SEC’s Electronic Data
Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval (EDGAR) system did not provide
sufficient information to determine whether company management, the
auditor of record, or regulators identified the error or fraud, and in those
cases in which there was a change in the auditor of record, whether the
predecessor auditor or the successor auditor identified the problem and
whether it was identified before or after the change in auditor of record.
Also, the recent corporate financial reporting failures have greatly
increased the pressures on company management and their auditors
regarding honest, fair, and complete financial reporting. See appendix IV
for additional details of our analysis.

Regarding further analysis to determine whether restatements are
associated with the “fresh look,” we believe such additional future research
could potentially add value to better predict the benefits of mandatory
audit firm rotation and the future need for mandatory audit firm rotation.
See the observations section of this report for our views on mandatory
audit firm rotation considering the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s requirements for
enhancing auditor independence and audit quality and other factors to
consider in evaluating the need for mandatory audit firm rotation.




Page 47                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Experience of Foreign   To obtain other countries’ current or previous experience with or
                        consideration of mandatory audit firm rotation, we surveyed the securities
Countries with          regulators of the Group of Seven Industrialized Nations (G-7), which
Mandatory Audit Firm    included the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Japan, Canada, and Italy.
                        In addition to the G-7 countries’ securities regulators, we also surveyed the
Rotation                following members of the International Organization of Securities
                        Commissions (IOSCO)47: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, China, Hong
                        Kong, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Sweden,
                        and Switzerland.48 The IOSCO members represent these foreign countries’
                        organizations with duties and responsibilities which are similar to the SEC
                        in the United States. We received responses from 11 of the 19 countries’
                        securities regulators surveyed.

                        Italy and Brazil reported having mandatory audit firm rotation for public
                        companies, and Singapore reported the requirement for banks that are
                        incorporated in Singapore. Austria also reported that beginning in 2004,
                        mandatory audit firm rotation will be required for the auditor of record of
                        public companies. Spain and Canada reported that they previously had
                        mandatory audit firm rotation requirements. Generally, reasons reported
                        for requiring mandatory audit firm rotation related to auditor
                        independence, audit quality, or increased competition for providing audit
                        services. Reasons for abandoning the requirements for mandatory audit
                        firm rotation related to its lack of cost-effectiveness, cost, and having
                        achieved the objective of increased competition for audit services. Many of
                        the survey respondents also reported either requiring or considering audit
                        partner rotation requirements that are similar to the requirements of the
                        Sarbanes-Oxley Act. See appendix V for additional information on the
                        survey respondents’ experiences and consideration of mandatory audit
                        firm rotation and audit partner rotation.


                        47
                           IOSCO is an international association of securities regulators that was created in 1983 to
                        promote high standards of regulation in order to maintain just, efficient, and sound markets,
                        promote the development of domestic markets, establish standards and an effective
                        surveillance of international securities transactions, and promote the integrity of the
                        markets by a rigorous application of the standards and by effective enforcement against
                        offenses.
                        48
                          Based on our review of literature concerning mandatory audit firm rotation, we found that
                        Saudi Arabia was identified as presently requiring mandatory audit firm rotation of public
                        companies. While Saudi Arabia is not an IOSCO member, we attempted to administer our
                        survey to the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority, Saudi Arabia’s financial supervisory
                        authority, but did not receive a response.




                        Page 48                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
GAO Observations   The Sarbanes-Oxley Act contains significant reforms intended to enhance
                   auditor independence and audit quality, which are viewed by the groups of
                   stakeholders we surveyed or held discussions with as likely to sufficiently
                   achieve the same intended benefits as mandatory audit firm rotation when
                   fully implemented. In that respect, the SEC’s regulations to implement the
                   auditor independence and audit quality requirements of the act have only
                   recently been issued, and the PCAOB is in the process of implementing its
                   inspection program. Therefore, we believe it will take at least several years
                   to gain some experience with the effectiveness of the act’s requirements
                   concerning auditor independence and audit quality.

                   We believe that it is critical for both the SEC and the PCAOB, through its
                   oversight and enforcement programs, to formally monitor the effectiveness
                   of the regulations and programs intended to implement the Sarbanes-Oxley
                   Act. This information will be valuable in considering whether changes,
                   including mandatory audit firm rotation, may be needed to further protect
                   the public interest. We noted that survey responses from Tier 1 firms show
                   that the potential for lawsuits or regulatory action is a major incentive for
                   the firms to appropriately deal with public company management in
                   resolving financial reporting issues. We believe that the SEC’s and
                   PCAOB’s rigorous enforcement of regulations and other requirements will
                   be critical to the effectiveness of the act’s requirements.

                   It is clear that the likely additional costs associated with mandatory
                   rotation have influenced the views of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public
                   companies and their audit committee chairs to not support mandatory
                   rotation. However, we believe that these additional costs need to be
                   balanced with the need to protect the public interest, especially
                   considering the recent significant accountability breakdowns and their
                   impact on investors and other interested parties. Although expecting to
                   have zero financial reporting/audit failures is not a realistic expectation,
                   Enron, WorldCom, and others have recently demonstrated that a single
                   financial reporting/audit failure of a major public company can have
                   significant consequences to shareholders and other interested parties. We
                   believe it is fairly certain that mandatory audit firm rotation would result in
                   selection costs and additional support costs for public companies. Also,
                   most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies believe that
                   mandatory audit firm rotation would also result in higher audit fees,
                   primarily due to higher initial years’ audit costs.




                   Page 49                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
If public accounting firms under mandatory audit firm rotation have (1) a
shorter tenure as auditor of record to recover higher initial year audit costs
and (2) fewer opportunities to also sell nonaudit services due to the
Sarbanes-Oxley Act requirements concerning prohibited nonaudit services,
then we believe it is reasonable to assume, as public accounting firms and
public companies have done, that the higher initial year audit costs
associated with a new auditor are likely to be passed on to the public
companies, along with increased marketing costs. However, competition
among public accounting firms for providing audit services should to some
extent also affect audit fees. Therefore, we believe it is uncertain at this
time how these dynamics would play out in the market for audit services
and their effect on audit fees over the long term. However, if intensive
price competition were to occur, the expected benefits of mandatory audit
firm rotation could be adversely affected if audit quality suffers due to audit
fees that do not support an appropriate level of audit work.

We believe that mandatory audit firm rotation may not be the most efficient
way to enhance auditor independence and audit quality, considering the
costs of changing the auditor of record and the loss of auditor knowledge
that is not carried forward to the new auditor. We also believe that the
potential benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation are harder to predict
and quantify while we are fairly certain there will be additional costs. In
that respect, mandatory audit firm rotation is not a panacea that totally
removes pressures on the auditor in appropriately resolving financial
reporting issues that may materially affect the public companies’ financial
statements. Those pressures are likely to continue even if the term of the
auditor is limited under any mandatory rotation process. Furthermore,
most public companies will only use the Big 4 firms for their auditor of
record for a variety of reasons, including the firms’ having sufficient
industry knowledge and resources to audit their companies and
expectations of the capital markets to use Big 4 firms. These public
companies may only have 1 or 2 choices for their auditor of record under
any mandatory rotation system. However, over time a mandatory audit
firm rotation requirement may result in more firms transitioning into
additional industry sectors if the market for such audits has sufficient
profit margins.

The current environment has greatly increased the pressures from
regulators and investors on public company management and public
accounting firms to have financial statements issued by public companies
that comply with GAAP and provide full disclosure. These pressures and
the reforms of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act provide incentives to have financial



Page 50                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
reporting that is honest, fair, and complete and that serves the public
interest. If such reporting is widely and consistently achieved then the
likelihood of the “fresh look” serving to identify financial reporting issues
that may materially affect financial statements that were either overlooked
or not appropriately dealt with by the previous auditor of record will be
reduced. However, it is uncertain at this time if the current climate and
pressures for accurate and complete financial reporting and for restoring
public trust will be sustained over the long term.

Regarding the need for mandatory audit firm rotation, we believe the most
prudent course at this time is for the SEC and the PCAOB to monitor and
evaluate the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s requirements for
enhancing auditor independence and audit quality, and ultimately restoring
investor confidence. In that respect, the PCAOB’s inspection program for
registered public accounting firms could also provide an opportunity to
provide a “fresh look,” which would enhance auditor independence and
audit quality through the program’s inspection activities, and may provide
new insights regarding (1) public companies’ financial reporting practices
that pose a high risk of issuing materially misstated financial statements for
the audit committees to consider and (2) possibly either using the auditor
of record or another firm to assist in reviewing these areas. In addition,
future research on the potential benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation
as suggested by our analysis of restatements of financial statements may
also be valuable to consider along with the evaluations of the effectiveness
of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

Further, we also believe that currently audit committees, with their
increased responsibilities under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, can play a very
important role in enhancing auditor independence and audit quality. In that
respect, the Conference Board Commission on Public Trust and Private
Enterprise in its January 9, 2003, report stated that auditor rotation is a
useful tool for building shareholder confidence in the integrity of the audit
and of the company’s financial statements. The commission advocated that
audit committees consider rotating audit firms when there are
circumstances that could call into question the audit firm’s independence
from management. The circumstances that merited consideration included
when (1) significant nonaudit services are provided to the company by the
auditor of record (even if they have been approved by the audit
committee), (2) one or more former partners or managers of the audit firm
are employed by the company, or (3) lengthy tenure of the auditor of
record, such as over 10 years—which our survey results show is prevalent
at many Fortune 1000 public companies. In such cases, we believe audit



Page 51                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                      committees need to be especially vigilant in the oversight of the auditor and
                      in considering whether a “fresh look” is warranted. We also believe that if
                      audit committees regularly evaluate whether audit firm rotation would be
                      beneficial, given the facts and circumstances of their companies’ situation,
                      and are actively involved in helping to ensure audit independence and audit
                      quality, many of the intended benefits of audit firm rotation could be
                      realized at the initiative of the audit committee rather than through a
                      mandatory requirement.

                      However, audit committees need to have access to adequate resources,
                      including their own budgets, to be able to operate with the independence
                      necessary to effectively perform their responsibilities under the Sarbanes-
                      Oxley Act. Further, we believe that an audit committee’s ability to operate
                      independently is directly related to the independence of the public
                      company’s board of directors. It is not realistic to believe that audit
                      committees will unilaterally resolve financial reporting issues that
                      materially affect a public company’s financial statements without vetting
                      those issues with the board of directors. Also, the ability of the board of
                      directors to operate independently may also be affected in corporate
                      governance structures where the public company’s chief executive officer
                      also serves as the chair of the board of directors. Like audit committees,
                      boards of directors also need to be independent and to have adequate
                      resources and access to independent attorneys and other advisors when
                      they believe it is appropriate. Finally, for any system to function effectively,
                      there must be incentives for parties to do the right thing, adequate
                      transparency to provide reasonable assurance that people will do the right
                      thing, and appropriate accountability when people do not do the right
                      thing.



Agency Comments and   We provided copies of a draft of this report to the SEC, AICPA, and PCAOB
                      for their review. Representatives of the AICPA and the PCAOB provided
Our Evaluation        technical comments, which we have incorporated where applicable.
                      Representatives of the SEC had no comments.


                      We are sending copies of this report to the Chairman and Ranking Minority
                      Member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. We are also
                      sending copies of this report to the Chairman of the Securities and
                      Exchange Commission, the Chairman of the Public Company Accounting




                      Page 52                                         GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Oversight Board, and other interested parties. This report will also be
available at no charge on GAO’s Web site at http://www.gao.gov.

If you or your staffs have any questions concerning this report, please
contact me at (202) 512-9471 or John J. Reilly, Jr., Assistant Director, at
(202) 512-9517. Key contributors are acknowledged in appendix VI.




Jeanette M. Franzel
Director, Financial Management and Assurance




Page 53                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix I

Objectives, Scope, and Methodology                                                            AA
                                                                                               ppp
                                                                                                 ep
                                                                                                  ned
                                                                                                    n
                                                                                                    x
                                                                                                    id
                                                                                                     e
                                                                                                     x
                                                                                                     Iis




              As mandated by Section 207 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 20021 and as
              agreed with your staff, to perform our study and review of the potential
              effects of requiring mandatory rotation of registered public accounting
              firms, we

              1. identified and reviewed research studies and related literature that
                 addressed issues concerning auditor independence and audit quality
                 associated with the length of a public accounting firm’s tenure and the
                 costs and benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation;

              2. analyzed the issues we identified to

              • develop detailed questionnaires to obtain the views of public accounting
                firms and public company chief financial officers and their audit
                committee chairs on the potential effects of mandatory audit firm
                rotation,

              • hold discussions with officials of other interested stakeholders, such as
                institutional investors, federal banking regulators, U.S. stock exchanges,
                state boards of accountancy, the American Institute of Certified Public
                Accountants (AICPA), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC),
                and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB), to
                obtain their views on the issues associated with mandatory audit firm
                rotation, and

              • obtain information from other countries on their experiences with
                mandatory audit firm rotation; and

              3. identified restatements of annual 2001 and 2002 financial statements of
                 Fortune 1000 public companies due to errors or fraud that were
                 reported to the SEC during 2002 and 2003 through August 31, 2003, to

              • determine whether the restatement occurred before or after a change in
                the public companies’ auditor of record, and

              • test the value of the “fresh look” commonly attributed to mandatory
                audit firm rotation.




              1
                  Pub. L. No. 107-204, 116 Stat. 745, 775.




              Page 54                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                             Appendix I
                             Objectives, Scope, and Methodology




                             We conducted our work in Washington, D.C., between November 2002 and
                             November 2003 in accordance with U.S. generally accepted government
                             auditing standards.



Identifying Research         To identify existing research related to mandatory audit firm rotation, we
Studies Concerning Auditor   utilized several methods including general Internet searches, requests from
                             the AICPA library, the AICPA’s Web site (www.aicpa.org), the American
Independence and Audit
                             Accounting Association’s Web site (http://accounting.rutgers.edu/raw/aaa/),
Quality                      the SEC’s Web site (www.sec.gov), requests from GAO’s internal library
                             resources, and suggestions provided by communities of interest. Also,
                             many studies were identified through bibliographies of previously
                             identified research. We used the following keywords in our searches:
                             “mandatory audit firm rotation,” “mandatory auditor rotation,”
                             “compulsory audit firm rotation,” “compulsory auditor rotation,” “auditor
                             rotation,” “auditor change(s),” and “auditor switching.”

                             We identified a total of 80 studies, articles, position papers, and reports
                             from our searches. We then applied the following criteria to these studies.
                             We focused on studies that (1) were mostly published no earlier than 1980,
                             (2) contained some original data analyses, and (3) focused on some aspect
                             of mandatory audit firm rotation. Using these criteria, 27 studies were
                             subjected to further methodological review to evaluate the design and
                             approach of the studies, the quality of the data used, and the
                             reasonableness of the studies’ conclusions and to determine if any
                             limitations of a study were of sufficient severity to call into question the
                             reasonableness of the conclusion. We eliminated 10 of these studies
                             because they were actually position papers or literature summaries, and
                             did not include any original data analyses. One additional study was
                             eliminated because of fundamental methodological flaws.

                             Of the remaining 16 studies that were subjected to a high-level
                             methodological review, 7 have major caveats that should be considered
                             along with the results of the studies, while the other 9 have some more
                             minor methodological limitations, such as limited application to the
                             subject; limited data availability; or insufficient information on issues
                             including choice of samples, response rates, and nonresponse analyses. In
                             developing the survey instruments covering issues concerning auditor
                             independence and audit quality associated with the length of a public
                             accounting firm’s tenure and the costs and benefits of mandatory audit firm
                             rotation, we primarily used the studies from among this latter group of 9 as
                             listed below.



                             Page 55                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix I
Objectives, Scope, and Methodology




The Relationship of Audit Failures and Audit Tenure, by Jeffrey
Casterella of Colorado State University, W. Robert Knechel of University of
Florida and University of Auckland, and Paul Walker of the University of
Virginia, November 2002.

Auditor Rotation and Retention Rules: A Theoretical Analysis (Rotation
Rules), by Eric C. Weber of Northwestern University, June 1998.

Audit-Firm Tenure and the Quality of Financial Reports, by Van E.
Johnson of Georgia State University, Inder K. Khurana of the University of
Missouri-Columbia, and J. Kenneth Reynolds of Louisiana State University,
Winter 2002.

“The Effects of Auditor Change on Audit Fees: Tests of Price Cutting and
Price Recovery”, The Accounting Review, by D.T. Simon, and J.R. Francis,
April 1988.

“Does Auditor Quality and Tenure Matter to Investors?” Evidence from the
Bond Market. Sattar Mansi of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, William F.
Maxwell of University of Arizona, and Darius P. Miller of Kelley School of
Business, February 2003 paper under revision for the Journal of
Accounting Research.

An Analysis of Restatement Matters: Rules, Errors, Ethics, for the Five
Years Ended December 31, 2002, The Huron Consulting Group, January
2003.

The Commission on Auditors’ Responsibilities: Report of Tentative
Conclusions, The Cohen Commission (an independent commission
established by the AICPA), 1977. (Limited to Section 9, “Maintaining the
Independence of Auditors, Rotation of Auditors”).

“Audit Fees and Auditor Change; An Investigation of the Persistence of Fee
Reduction by Type of Change”, Journal of Business Finance and
Accounting, by A. Gregory, and P. Collier, January 1996.

“Auditor Changes and Tendering: UK Interview Evidence”, Accounting,
Auditing and Accountability Journal, v11n1, V. Beattie, and S. Fearnley,
1998.




Page 56                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                               Appendix I
                               Objectives, Scope, and Methodology




Obtaining the Views of         We analyzed the issues identified from our review of studies, articles,
Public Accounting Firms        position papers, and reports to develop an understanding of the
                               background and related advantages and disadvantages of mandatory audit
and Public Company Chief       firm rotation. We developed three separate survey instruments
Financial Officers and Their   incorporating a variety of issues related to auditor independence, audit
Audit Committee Chairs on      quality, mandatory audit firm rotation and the potential effects on audit
Mandatory Audit Firm           costs, audit fees, audit quality, audit risk, and competition that may arise
Rotation                       with a mandatory audit firm rotation requirement. In addition, these survey
                               instruments solicited views on the impact of specific provisions of the
                               Sarbanes-Oxley Act intended to enhance auditor independence and audit
                               quality, other practices for enhancing audit quality, views on implementing
                               mandatory audit firm rotation, and overall opinions on requiring mandatory
                               audit firm rotation.

                               We performed field tests of the survey instruments to help ensure that the
                               survey questions would be understandable to different groups of
                               respondents, eliminate factual inaccuracies, and obtain feedback and
                               recommendations to improve the surveys. We took the feedback and
                               comments we received into consideration in developing our final survey
                               instruments. Specifically, during March and April of 2003, we performed
                               field tests of the survey instrument for public accounting firms with eight
                               different public accounting firms, including two of the Big 4 firms, two
                               national firms, and four regional or local firms. During May 2003, we
                               conducted field tests of the survey instrument for public company chief
                               financial officers with four public companies, including two Fortune 1000
                               companies and two commercial banks not included in the Fortune 1000.
                               We tailored the survey instrument for public company audit committee
                               chairpersons by incorporating the feedback and comments we received
                               from the chief financial officers during the field tests we performed with
                               public companies.




                               Page 57                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                    Appendix I
                    Objectives, Scope, and Methodology




Surveys of Public   Section 207 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act mandated that GAO study the
Accounting Firms    potential effects of mandatory audit firm rotation of registered public
                    accounting firms, referring to public accounting firms that would be
                    registered with the new PCAOB. During the January 2003 time frame when
                    we were framing the population, since the PCAOB was in the process of
                    getting organized and becoming operational, there were no public
                    accounting firms registered with the PCAOB at that time.2 Therefore, we
                    coordinated with the AICPA to establish a population of public accounting
                    firms that would most likely register with the PCAOB. The AICPA provided
                    a complete list of the more than 1,100 public accounting firms that were
                    registered with the AICPA’s Securities and Exchange Commission Practice
                    Section (SECPS)3 as of January 2003. Prior to the restructuring of the
                    SECPS, AICPA bylaws required that all members that engage in the
                    practice of public accounting with a firm auditing one or more SEC clients
                    join the SECPS. Public accounting firms that did not have any SEC clients
                    could join the SECPS voluntarily. Based on the information submitted in
                    their 2001 annual reports, these SECPS member firms collectively had
                    nearly 15,000 SEC clients.4 Therefore, the public accounting firms
                    registered with the SECPS at that time were used to frame an alternative
                    source of public accounting firms that perform audits of issuers registered
                    with the SEC.

                    Based on the AICPA-provided SECPS membership list and the number of
                    SEC clients reported in these SECPS member firms’ 2001 annual reports, of
                    1,117 SECPS members, 696 firms had 1 or more SEC clients and 421 firms
                    were SECPS members but did not audit any public companies. The 696


                    2
                      The PCAOB established the process for public accounting firms to register with the
                    PCAOB starting in April 2003, with public accounting firms having an initial opportunity to
                    register with the PCAOB no later than October 22, 2003. As of October 22, 2003, according to
                    the PCAOB, there were 598 public accounting firms registered with the PCAOB and 55
                    public accounting firms that had applications pending the PCAOB’s review.
                    3
                      The AICPA’s SECPS was a part of the former self-regulatory system. SECPS was overseen
                    by the former Public Oversight Board (POB), which represented the public interest on all
                    matters affecting public confidence in the integrity of the audit process. The SECPS
                    required AICPA member accounting firms registered with the SECPS to subject their
                    professional practices to peer review and oversight by the POB and SEC. The AICPA
                    recently announced a new voluntary membership called the Center for Public Company
                    Audit Firms that restructures and replaces the SECPS, which had several of its functions
                    absorbed into the PCAOB.
                    4
                      According to SEC records, there were nearly 18,000 issuers registered with the SEC as of
                    February 2003.




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                             members of the SECPS collectively audited 14,928 of the 17,956 issuers
                             registered with the SEC. Since approximately 3,000 issuers were audited
                             by public accounting firms that were not members of the SECPS, we
                             obtained a list from the SEC that included the names of over 1,000 public
                             accounting firms that performed the audits of public companies registered
                             with the SEC. We compared the 696 SECPS member firms to all of the
                             public accounting firms that were included in the SEC’s list in order to
                             identify the non-SECPS member public accounting firms, which were
                             mainly consisted of foreign public accounting firms or domestic firms that
                             are not AICPA members. Since the PCAOB has indicated that it will not
                             exempt foreign public accounting firms that audit issuers registered with
                             the SEC from registering with the PCAOB, we included non-SECPS
                             member public accounting firms that reported to the SEC that they had 10
                             or more SEC clients in the population.



Stratification of Public     In order to identify differences in views on the potential effects of
Accounting Firm Population   mandatory audit firm rotation for respondents that vary based on the size
                             of the public accounting firm, location (e.g., domestic versus foreign firms)
                             and other factors, we stratified the population into three tiers based on the
                             number of SEC clients reported to the SECPS in the SECPS member firms’
                             2001 annual reports and the aforementioned SEC data for non-SECPS
                             member public accounting firms:

                             1. Tier 1 firms: 92 SECPS member and 5 non-SECPS public accounting
                                firms that had 10 or more 2001 SEC clients in 2001,

                             2. Tier 2 firms: 604 SECPS member firms that had from 1 to 9, 2001 SEC
                                clients in 2001, and

                             3. Tier 3 firms: 421 SECPS member firms that reported having no SEC
                                clients.

                             The basis for selecting public accounting firms with 10 or more SEC clients
                             was twofold. First, the 92 SECPS member firms included in Tier 1
                             collectively had approximately 90 percent of all of the SEC clients reported
                             to the SECPS in the member firms’ 2001 annual reports. Second, the public
                             accounting firms with 10 or more SEC clients were viewed to collectively
                             have the most experience and knowledge about changing auditors for
                             public company clients and accordingly were considered to have a great
                             interest in the potential effects of mandatory audit firm rotation. Tier 2 was
                             established because the 604 SECPS member firms with 1 to 9 SEC clients



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                           comprises approximately 10 percent of the total SEC clients reported to the
                           the SECPS in member firms’ 2001 annual reports and were also considered
                           to have a great interest in, as well as important views on, the potential
                           effects of mandatory audit firm rotation based on their experience and
                           knowledge of being auditors for public companies. Lastly, we included the
                           421 SECPS member public accounting firms that had no SEC clients in Tier
                           3 of our population in order to determine if there would be greater or less
                           interest in providing financial statement audit services to public companies
                           if mandatory audit firm rotation were required. We requested that the
                           public accounting firms’ chief executive officers or managing partners, or
                           their designated representatives, complete the survey.



Method of Administration   In order to conduct our survey, we selected a 100 percent certainty sample
                           of Tier 1 public accounting firms consisted of all 92 SECPS member firms
                           and all 5 non-SECPS member firms. In addition, we selected separate
                           random samples from each of the two remaining strata. We created two
                           separate Web sites for the public accounting firm surveys. The top tier
                           firms were surveyed independently of the second and third tiers because
                           the Tier 1 survey was administered jointly with another study dealing with
                           consolidation of major public accounting firms since 1989 as mandated by
                           Section 701 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.5 The survey for the Tier 2 and Tier 3
                           firms, which dealt only with the potential effects of mandatory audit firm
                           rotation, was created at a separate Web site. A unique password and user
                           ID was assigned to each selected public accounting firm in our sample to
                           facilitate completion of the survey online. The surveys were made
                           available to the Tier 1 firms during the week of May 27, 2003, and the
                           surveys to the Tier 2 and Tier 3 firms were made available during the week
                           of June 12, 2003. Both survey Web sites remained open until September
                           2003. Responses to surveys completed online were automatically stored on
                           GAO’s Web sites. From August through September 2003, we performed
                           follow-up efforts to increase the overall response rates by telephoning the
                           selected public accounting firms that had not completed the survey, and
                           requested that they take advantage of the opportunity to express their
                           views on this important issue by doing so.

                           Lastly, in order to gain knowledge about whether the views of the Tier 1
                           public accounting firms that did not complete our survey were materially

                           5
                             U.S. General Accounting Office, Public Accounting Firms: Mandated Study on
                           Consolidation and Competition, GAO-03-864 (Washington, D.C.: July 30, 2003).




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                         different from the overall views of the Tier 1 public accounting firms that
                         completed our survey, we asked the following key questions of those public
                         accounting firms that did not complete our survey and that we contacted
                         during our telephone follow-up efforts. Specifically, we asked whether
                         their firms believed the benefits of mandatory audit firm rotation would
                         exceed the costs of implementing such a requirement and whether their
                         firms would support requiring mandatory audit firm rotation. As more fully
                         described in the body of this report, the overall views expressed by the Tier
                         1 public accounting firms that completed our survey generally indicated
                         that the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation would exceed the benefits
                         and that their firms were not in favor of supporting such a requirement.
                         The views of the Tier 1 public accounting firms that did not complete our
                         survey and that we contacted in our telephone follow-up efforts were
                         generally consistent with the overall views of the Tier 1 public accounting
                         firms that completed our survey.



Public Accounting Firm   As disclosed in our survey instruments, all survey results were to be
Survey Results           compiled and presented in summary form only as part of our report, and
                         we will not release individually identifiable data from these surveys, unless
                         compelled by law or required to do so by the Congress. We received
                         responses from 74 of the 97 Tier 1 firms, or 76.3 percent.6 Because of the
                         more limited participation of Tier 2 firms (85, or 30.1 percent) and Tier 3
                         firms (52, or 21.9 percent) in our survey, we are not projecting their
                         responses to the population of firms in these tiers. The presentation of this
                         report focuses on the responses from the Tier 1 firms, but any substantial
                         differences in their overall views and those reported to us by either Tier 2
                         or 3 firms are discussed where applicable.

                         Table 2 summarizes the population, sample sizes, and overall responses
                         received for all three tiers of public accounting firms surveyed on the
                         potential effects of mandatory audit firm rotation.




                         6
                           Estimates of Tier 1 firms are subject to sampling errors of no more than plus or minus 7
                         percentage points (95 percent confidence level) unless otherwise noted, as well as to
                         possible nonsampling errors generally found in surveys.




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                               Table 2: Public Accounting Firms’ Population, Sample Sizes, and Survey Response
                               Rates

                                                          Tier 1 firms   Tier 2 firms   Tier 3 firms          Totals
                               Population size                      97           604            421            1,122
                               Sample size                          97           282            237              616
                               Total responses                      74            85             52              211
                               Response rate                   76.3%          30.1%           21.9%              ---
                               Source: GAO survey data.




Surveys of Public Company      As a part of fulfilling our objective to study the potential effects of
Chief Financial Officers and   mandatory audit firm rotation, we obtained the views on the advantages
                               and disadvantages and related costs and benefits from a random sample of
Audit Committee Chairs
                               chief financial officers and audit committee chairs of public companies
                               registered with the SEC. We solicited the views of chief financial officers
                               of public companies because they were considered to be very
                               knowledgeable about the issues involving financial statement audits of
                               public companies. We also solicited the views of audit committee chairs
                               because under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the audit committee has expanded
                               responsibilities for monitoring and overseeing public companies’ financial
                               reporting and the financial statement audit process. We obtained such
                               views by administering a survey to randomly selected samples of public
                               company chief financial officers and their audit committee chairs.

                               Section 207 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act defines “mandatory rotation” as the
                               imposition of a limit on the period of years for which a particular registered
                               public accounting firm may be the auditor of record for a particular issuer.
                               Therefore, in framing the population from which we planned to draw our
                               sample of public companies, we researched what the definition of an
                               “issuer” is with the SEC, with GAO’s General Counsel, and the AICPA’s
                               SECPS. The primary purpose of conducting this research was to determine
                               whether mutual funds (or mutual fund complexes) and other types of
                               investment companies such as investment trusts, should be included in the
                               population. Based on discussions with the Director of the SEC’s Office of
                               Investment Management, mutual funds and investment trusts are issuers
                               that are required to file periodic reports with the SEC under the Securities
                               Exchange Act of 1934 or the Investment Company Act of 1940. Also,
                               officials in the SEC’s Office of Investment Management indicated that there
                               are nearly 10,000 individual mutual funds grouped into 877 mutual fund
                               complexes (also known as families). A mutual fund complex is


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                              responsible for hiring the auditor of record, either collectively or
                              individually, for the individual mutual funds that are included in the family
                              or complex. As such, investment trusts and the 877 mutual fund complexes
                              were included in our population for the purpose of administering our
                              survey.

                              We obtained lists of public company issuers from the SEC in developing the
                              population as follows: The SEC’s Office of Corporation Finance provided a
                              list of 17,079 public companies from the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering,
                              Analysis, and Retrieval (EDGAR) system. This list included registrants that
                              were listed as current issuers registered with the SEC as of February 2003
                              and included 14,938 domestic public companies (including investment
                              trusts) and 2,141 foreign public companies (i.e., companies that are
                              domiciled outside of the United States but are registered with the SEC).
                              Our comparison of this SEC list to a separate list of Fortune 1000
                              companies identified an additional 32 public companies that were added to
                              the original list of 17,079, bringing the total population to an adjusted total
                              of 17,111. As noted above, we also obtained a complete list of 877 mutual
                              fund complexes from the SEC that included current issuers registered with
                              the SEC’s Office of Investment Management. Therefore, the population of
                              public company issuers as of February 2003 totaled 17,988, consisted of
                              17,111 public companies and 877 mutual fund complexes.



Stratification of Chief       In order to identify differences in views on the potential effects of
Financial Officer and Audit   mandatory audit firm rotation based on differences in company industry,
                              size, or geographic location, we stratified the population into the following
Committee Chair
                              three strata: (1) domestic Fortune 1000 companies, (2) other (non-Fortune
Population                    1000) domestic companies and mutual fund complexes, and (3) foreign
                              companies.

                              Fortune 1000 stratum: Based on Fortune’s list of the Fortune 1000 as of
                              March 2003, we identified 960 public companies in the Fortune 1000; the
                              remaining 40 companies were privately owned. Since private companies
                              are not subject to SEC rules or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s provisions, these
                              40 companies were not included in the stratum. We used the file provided
                              by the SEC listing the 17,079 domestic and foreign public companies to
                              extract a separate stratum of the 960 public companies in the Fortune 1000.
                              In addition, in comparing Fortune’s list of the Fortune 1000 to the SEC’s
                              listing of public companies, we identified 32 additional companies that
                              were included in the Fortune 1000 but which were not included in the SEC
                              list. In connection with framing the Fortune 1000 stratum, we added these



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                           32 companies to the list of domestic and foreign public companies provided
                           to us by the SEC to ensure that it was complete.

                           Foreign company stratum: Using the “state code” identifier included in
                           the adjusted SEC list of 17,111 domestic and foreign public companies, we
                           extracted a separate stratum of 2,141 foreign companies.

                           Other domestic companies and mutual fund complexes stratum: After
                           extracting the 960 domestic Fortune 1000 public companies and the 2,141
                           foreign public companies from the adjusted SEC list of 17,111 domestic and
                           foreign public companies, a separate stratum of 14,010 non-Fortune 1000
                           public companies was created from the SEC file representing the “other
                           domestic” public companies. These 14,010 other domestic public
                           companies (which included investment trusts) were combined with the 877
                           mutual fund complexes provided by the SEC’s Office of Investment
                           Management to create a total population for this stratum of 14,887.



Method of Administration   In order to conduct these surveys, we selected a separate random sample
                           from each of the three public company strata. We mailed a survey package
                           to the chief financial officer of each public company issuer included in our
                           sample. This survey package provided the chief financial officer with the
                           option of completing the enclosed hard copy of the survey and returning it
                           in the mail to our Atlanta Field Office or of completing the survey online.
                           We created a Web site with the public company survey for the chief
                           financial officers. A unique password and user ID was assigned to each
                           selected company in our sample of companies to facilitate completion of
                           the survey online. In addition, a separate survey directed to the chair of
                           the audit committee (or head of an equivalent body) was included in the
                           mail survey package. The chief financial officer was asked to forward this
                           survey to the audit committee chair. The survey for the public company
                           audit committee chairs was not made available online. As such, these
                           surveys could only be completed on hard copy and returned to our Atlanta
                           Field Office. The survey packages were mailed to all 1,171 public
                           companies in June 2003. The survey Web site for public company chief
                           financial officers remained open until September 2003. The cutoff date for
                           accepting mailed surveys from public company chief financial officers and
                           audit committee chairs was September 2003. Responses to surveys
                           completed online were automatically stored into GAO’s Web sites, and
                           mailed survey responses of chief financial officers and audit committee
                           chairs were entered into a separate compilation database by GAO
                           contractor personnel who were hired to perform such data inputting. From



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                        August through September 2003, we also performed follow-up efforts to
                        increase the overall response rates by telephoning public company chief
                        financial officers, who had not completed or returned the survey, and
                        requesting that the chief financial officer and the audit committee chair
                        complete our survey and return it to us.



Public Company Survey   As disclosed in our surveys, all survey results were to be compiled and
Results                 presented in summary form only as part of our report, and we will not
                        release individually identifiable data from these surveys, unless compelled
                        by law or required to do so by the Congress. Of the 330 Fortune 1000 public
                        companies sampled, we received responses from 201, or 60.9 percent, of
                        their chief financial officers and 191, or 57.9 percent, of their audit
                        committee chairs.7 Because of limited participation of the other domestic
                        companies and mutual funds (131, or 29.1 percent, of their chief financial
                        officers and 96, or 21.3 percent, of their audit committee chairs) and the
                        foreign public companies (99, or 25.3 percent, of their chief financial
                        officers and 63, or 16.1 percent, of their audit committee chairs), we are not
                        projecting their responses to the population of companies in these strata.
                        The presentation of this report focuses on the responses from the Fortune
                        1000 public companies’ chief financial officers and their audit committee
                        chairs, but any substantial differences in their overall views and those
                        reported to us by the other groups of public companies we surveyed is
                        discussed where applicable.

                        Tables 3 and 4 summarize the population, sample size, and survey
                        responses received for all three strata of public company chief financial
                        officers and their audit committee chairs surveyed on the potential effects
                        of mandatory audit firm rotation.




                        7
                          The estimates from these surveys are subject to sampling errors of no more than plus or
                        minus 6 percentage points (95 percent confidence level) unless otherwise noted, as well as
                        to possible nonsampling errors generally found in surveys.




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                    Table 3: Public Company Chief Financial Officers’ Population, Sample Sizes, and
                    Survey Response Rates

                                                              Domestic public
                                               Fortune 1000    companies and    Foreign public
                                                 companies       mutual funds      companies         Totals
                    Population size                    960             14,887           2,141        17,988
                    Sample size                        330               450              391         1,171
                    Total responses                    201               131               99           431
                    Response rate                    60.9%             29.1%            25.3%           ---
                    Source: GAO survey data.




                    Table 4: Public Company Audit Committee Chairs’ Population, Sample Sizes, and
                    Survey Response Rates

                                                              Domestic public
                                               Fortune 1000    companies and    Foreign public
                                                 companies       mutual funds      companies         Totals
                    Population size                    960             14,887           2,141        17,988
                    Sample size                        330               450              391         1,171
                    Total responses                    191                96               63           350
                    Response rate                    57.9%             21.3%            16.1%           ---
                    Source: GAO survey data.




Additional Survey   We initially requested information from all 97 Tier 1 firms (firms with 10 or
Considerations      more SEC clients). We received responses from 74 of them. We conducted
                    follow-up with a limited number of the nonrespondents and did not find
                    substantive differences between the respondents and the nonrespondents
                    on key questions related to mandatory audit firm rotation. We requested
                    information from 330 Fortune 1000 public companies and their audit
                    committee chairs and received 201 and 191 responses from them,
                    respectively. While we did not conduct follow-up with the nonrespondents
                    from our surveys of Fortune 1000 public companies and their audit
                    committee chairs, we had no reason to believe that respondents and
                    nonrespondents to our original samples from these strata would
                    substantively differ on issues related to mandatory audit firm rotation.
                    Therefore, we analyzed respondent data from the Tier 1 and Fortune 1000
                    public companies and their audit committees as probability samples from
                    these respective populations.



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                                Survey results based on probability samples are subject to sampling error.
                                Each of the three samples (Tier 1 and Fortune 1000 public companies and
                                their audit committee chairs) is only one of a large number of samples we
                                might have drawn from the respective populations. Since each sample
                                could have provided different estimates, we express our confidence in the
                                precision of our three particular samples’ results as 95 percent confidence
                                intervals. These are intervals that would contain the actual population
                                values for 95 percent of the samples we could have drawn. As a result, we
                                are 95 percent confident that each of the confidence intervals in this report
                                will include the true values in the respective study populations. All
                                percentage estimates from the survey of Tier 1 firms have sampling errors
                                not exceeding +/- 7 percentage points unless otherwise noted. All
                                percentage estimates from the surveys of Fortune 1000 public companies
                                and their audit committee chairs have sampling errors not exceeding +/- 6
                                percentage points unless otherwise noted. Also, estimated percentages for
                                subgroups of Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public companies and their
                                audit committee chairs often have sampling errors exceeding these
                                thresholds, which are noted where they are reported. In addition, all
                                numerical estimates other than percentages have sampling errors of not
                                more than +/- 14 percent of the value of those numerical estimates.

                                Despite our judgment that respondents and nonrespondents do not differ
                                on issues related to mandatory audit firm rotation, our survey estimates
                                may nevertheless contain errors to the extent that there truly are
                                differences between these groups on issues related to this topic.

                                The practical difficulties of conducting any survey also introduce other
                                types of nonsampling errors. Differences in how a particular question is
                                interpreted and differences in the sources of information available to
                                respondents can also be sources of nonsampling errors. We included steps
                                in both the data collection and data analysis stages to minimize such
                                nonsampling errors. These steps included developing our survey questions
                                with the aid of our survey specialists, conducting pretests of the public
                                accounting firm and public company questions and questionnaires,
                                verifying computer analysis by an independent analyst, and double
                                verification of survey data entry where applicable.



Discussions Held with           To supplement the responses to our survey, we identified other
Officials of Other Interested   knowledgeable individuals associated with a broad range of communities
                                of interest and conducted telephone or in-person discussions to obtain
Stakeholders                    their views on mandatory audit firm rotation. The communities of interest



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                             included significant institutional investors (pension funds, mutual funds,
                             and insurance companies), self-regulatory organizations (such as stock
                             exchanges), consumer advocacy groups, regulators (state boards of
                             accountancy, banking regulators), the AICPA, the SEC, the PCAOB, and
                             recognized experts in corporate governance.

                             The questions for these discussions were based on key questions from the
                             surveys for public accounting firms and public companies. The results of
                             the discussions were compiled and presented in summary form only as part
                             of our report, and we will not release individually identifiable data from
                             these discussions, unless compelled by law or required to do so by the
                             Congress.



Obtaining Information from   In order to obtain other countries’ current or previous experience with or
Other Countries on Their     consideration of mandatory audit firm rotation, we administered surveys to
                             the securities regulators of the Group of Seven Industrialized Nations (G-
Experiences with             7), which included the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Japan, Canada,
Mandatory Audit Firm         and Italy. In addition to the G-7 countries’ securities regulators, we also
Rotation                     administered surveys to the following members of the International
                             Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO)8: Australia, Austria,
                             Belgium, Brazil, China, Hong Kong, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands,
                             Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The IOSCO members
                             represent these foreign countries’ organizations with duties and
                             responsibilities similar to those of the SEC in the United States.

                             We administered the surveys to these foreign countries’ securities
                             regulators in December 2002. From July and through October 2003, we
                             performed follow-up efforts to increase the overall response rates by
                             sending e-mail messages to the foreign countries’ securities regulators in
                             our sample who had not completed the survey and requested that they do
                             so. We received responses from 11 of the 19 countries’ securities
                             regulators surveyed.




                             8
                               IOSCO is an international association of securities regulators that was created in 1983 to
                             promote high standards of regulation in order to maintain just, efficient, and sound markets;
                             promote the development of domestic markets; establish standards and an effective
                             surveillance of international securities transactions; and promote the integrity of the
                             markets by rigorously applying the standards and by effectively enforcing them.




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Identifying Restatements of   To obtain some insight into the potential value of the “fresh look” provided
Annual Financial              by a new auditor of record, we analyzed the rate of annual financial
                              statement restatements reported to the SEC by Fortune 1000 public
Statements for Fortune 1000   companies during 2002 and 2003 through August 31, 2003. We particularly
Public Companies due to       focused on restatements for 2001 and 2002 and compared the financial
Errors or Fraud               statement restatement rates of those Fortune 1000 public companies that
                              changed their auditor of record to those of Fortune 1000 public companies
                              that did not change their auditor of record during this period.

                              In connection with performing this analysis, we separately tracked the
                              Fortune 1000 public companies that changed auditors from the public
                              companies that did not change auditors during 2001 and 2002. Financial
                              statement restatements filed for changes in accounting principles or
                              changes in organizational business structure (e.g., stock splits, mergers and
                              acquisitions), reclassifications, or to compliance with SEC reporting
                              requirements are not necessarily indications of compromised audit quality
                              or auditor independence. However, financial statement restatements due
                              to errors or fraud raise doubt about the integrity of management’s financial
                              reporting practices, the quality of the audit, or the auditor’s independence.
                              Therefore, the focus of our analysis was on annual financial statement
                              restatements (hereinafter referred to as “restatements”) due to errors or
                              fraud. Since not all restatements are indications of errors or fraud, we




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reviewed Form 10-KAs9 (amended 10-K filings), Form 8-Ks, and any related
SEC enforcement actions to determine if the restatements were due to
errors or fraud. The primary purpose of this test was to determine whether
the rate of restatements due to errors or fraud of companies that changed
auditors was higher or lower than the rate of restatements due to errors or
fraud of companies that did not change auditors.

For each of the Fortune 1000 companies, we searched SEC’s EDGAR
system for Form 10-KA filings submitted to the SEC during 2002 and 2003
through August 31, 2003, that amended either 2001 or 2002 financial
statements to identify annual financial statement restatements. We
determined if there had been a change in auditor from 2001 through 2002 by
reviewing the name of the auditor of record on the audit opinion included
in the Form 10-KA filed for 2001 and 2002, and also noted what type of audit
opinion was issued on the 2001 and 2002 financial statements. This
allowed us to identify the restatements associated with Fortune 1000 public
companies that changed auditors and the restatements of Fortune 1000
public companies that did not change auditors. We compared the level of
restatements for Fortune 1000 public companies that changed auditors to
the level of restatements of Fortune 1000 public companies that did not
change auditors.




9
  We focused on Form 10-KA filings because they include the actual restatements of
previously issued annual financial statements included in the original Form 10-K. While
amended quarterly filings (Form 10-QA) and Form 8-K filings may include disclosures of a
public company’s intention to restate previously issued annual financial statements, we did
not consider Form 10-QA or Form 8-K filings for the purpose of identifying restatements of
annual financial statements. Public companies may announce via a Form 10-Q or a Form 8-
K that the company is going to restate in the near future, but then not file restated financial
statements with the SEC because it may file for bankruptcy or become delisted. Therefore,
we intentionally limited our review of the SEC’s EDGAR system to identifying restatements
of annual financial statements that were filed with the SEC during 2002 and 2003 through
August 31, 2003. However, we also identified annual restatements of those Fortune 1000
public companies that included restatements in their annual Form 10-K filings. In addition,
some public companies (such as Freddie Mac, WorldCom, Qwest, and Enron) and their
auditors may still be in the process of determining the required adjustments and developing
appropriate disclosures before they can file the restatement of previously issued annual
financial statements via Form 10-KA to the SEC. Lastly, since we reviewed the Form 10-KA
filings for 2002 that had been submitted to the SEC through August 31, 2003, the results of
our analysis reflect restatements that have been submitted to the SEC through that date and
therefore do not include or reflect restatements that may be filed in the future by any public
companies that plan to restate previously issued financial statements or any public
companies that may not yet be aware of a need to restate previously issued annual financial
statements.




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For each of the restatements identified above, we reviewed underlying
Form 10-KA (amended 10-K filings), Form 8-Ks, and any related SEC
enforcement actions to quantify the dollar effect of the restatements and to
determine if the restatements were due to errors or fraud. We
differentiated restatements caused by errors or fraud from restatements
caused by changes that were not indications of compromised audit quality
or auditor independence, such as changes in accounting principles,
mergers, stock splits, and reclassifications using appropriate classification
criteria. In addition, we attempted to ascertain from the above sources
whether company management, the predecessor auditor, or the successor
auditor identified the error or fraud, and where applicable, whether it was
identified before or after the change in auditor.

After categorizing the 2001 and 2002 Fortune 1000 public companies’
annual financial statement restatements and annual financial statement
filings into (1) companies that did not change auditors and filed a
restatement, (2) companies that did not change auditors and did not file a
restatement, (3) companies that changed auditors and filed a restatement,
and (4) companies that changed auditors and did not file a restatement, we
compared the rates of restatements among and between these groups.




Page 71                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix II

Implementation of Mandatory Audit Firm
Rotation, if Required                                                                                          Appendx
                                                                                                                     Ii




                               If mandatory audit firm rotation were required, a number of implementing
                               factors affecting the structure of the requirement would need to be
                               decided. As a component of our surveys of public accounting firms, public
                               companies, and their audit committee chairs, we asked them to provide
                               their views on various implementing factors, regardless of whether they
                               supported mandatory audit firm rotation, including

                               • the limit on the incumbent firm’s audit tenure period,

                               • the “cooling off” period before the incumbent firm could again compete
                                 to provide audit services to the public company,

                               • under what circumstances either the audit committee or the public
                                 accounting firm could terminate the relationship for providing audit
                                 services,

                               • whether mandatory audit firm rotation should be implemented on a
                                 staggered basis, and

                               • whether mandatory audit firm rotation should be required for audits of
                                 all public companies, and if not, to which public companies should it be
                                 applied.



Time Limit on the Auditor of   Regarding the limit on the auditor of record’s tenure under mandatory audit
Record’s Tenure                firm rotation, about 47 percent of Tier 1 firms stated that the limit should be
                               8 to 10 years. Fortune 1000 chief financial officers and audit committee
                               chairs selected 8 to 10 years about as often as 5 to 7 years as the limit on
                               the auditor of record’s tenure. Tiers 2 and 3 firms and other public
                               companies’ audit committee chairs that responded to our surveys generally
                               favored an audit tenure of 5 to 7 years.



Time Limit Before the          Most Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public company chief financial officers
Auditor of Record Could        and their audit committee chairs believed the “cooling off” period under
                               mandatory audit firm rotation should be 3 or 4 years before the auditor of
Compete to Provide Audit
                               record could again compete to provide audit services to the public
Services to the Public         company previously audited.
Company Previously
Audited




                               Page 72                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                             Appendix II
                             Implementation of Mandatory Audit Firm
                             Rotation, if Required




Circumstances When the       Nearly all Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public company chief financial
Audit Committee or the       officers and their audit committee chairs stated that the audit committee
                             under mandatory audit firm rotation should be permitted to terminate the
Auditor of Record Could      auditor of record at any time if it is dissatisfied with the public accounting
Terminate the Business       firm’s performance or working relationship. Most Tier 1 firms and Fortune
Relationship Providing       1000 public company chief financial officers and their audit committee
Audit Services               chairs also believed that the auditor of record should be able to terminate
                             its relationship with the audit committee/public company at any time if the
                             public accounting firm is dissatisfied with the working relationship.



Period for Implementing      Nearly all Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 public company chief financial
Mandatory Audit Firm         officers and their audit committee chairs believed that mandatory audit
                             firm rotation should be implemented over a period of years (staggered) to
Rotation
                             avoid a significant number of public companies changing auditors
                             simultaneously.



Public Companies for Which   About 70 percent of Tier 1 firms believed that mandatory audit firm
Auditor of Record Should     rotation should not be applied uniformly for audits of all public companies
                             regardless of their nature or size. In contrast, about 81 percent of Fortune
Be Subject to Mandatory
                             1000 public companies and 65 percent of their audit committee chairs
Audit Firm Rotation          believed that mandatory audit firm rotation should be applied uniformly for
                             audits of all public companies regardless of the nature or size. Most chief
                             financial officers of other domestic and mutual fund public companies who
                             responded to our survey believe mandatory audit firm rotation should be
                             applied uniformly, and their audit committee chairs were split on the
                             subject. Comments that we received from many of the Tier 1 firms,
                             Fortune 1000 public companies, and their audit committee chairs that
                             supported requiring that mandatory audit firm rotation be applied
                             uniformly generally took the view that there should be a level playing field
                             and that the benefits and the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation should
                             be applied to all public companies. In contrast, those who commented
                             opposing requiring mandatory audit firm rotation for all public companies
                             generally took the view that the smaller public companies are less complex
                             and the costs of mandatory audit firm rotation would be more burdensome
                             for the smaller companies.

                             We asked those public accounting firms and public company chief financial
                             officers and their audit committee chairs who believed mandatory audit
                             firm rotation should not be applied uniformly to all public companies to



                             Page 73                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix II
Implementation of Mandatory Audit Firm
Rotation, if Required




select by company nature and size to which companies mandatory audit
firm rotation should apply. Tier 1 firms and Fortune 1000 audit committee
chairs more frequently selected the larger public companies. However,
Fortune 1000 chief financial officers were about evenly split in their views
regardless of the size of the public company. Chief financial officers and
their audit committee chairs of other domestic and mutual fund public
companies, as well as foreign public company chief financial officers and
their audit committee chairs, who responded to our survey more frequently
selected the larger public companies.




Page 74                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix III

Potential Value of Practices Other Than
Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation for Enhancing
Auditor Independence and Audit Quality                                                        Appendx
                                                                                                    iI




               We asked public accounting firms, public companies’ chief financial
               officers, and their audit committee chairs to provide their views on the
               potential value of the various following alternative practices we identified
               through our research and other inquiries made in developing our surveys
               versus the value of other than mandatory audit firm rotation for enhancing
               auditor independence and audit quality.

               • The audit committee periodically holding an open competition for
                 providing audit services: Having the audit committee periodically hold
                 an open competition for public accounting firms to serve as the public
                 company’s auditor of record, in which the incumbent auditor of record
                 could also compete, could potentially enhance auditor independence
                 and audit quality by letting the incumbent firm know that it does not
                 have unlimited tenure as the auditor of record and a lock on the
                 associated revenues, and that another firm may be selected to provide a
                 “fresh look” at the company’s financial reporting process, practices, and
                 financial statements. Also, the public company has an opportunity to
                 see the quality of personnel that another public accounting firm could
                 provide. However, the public company will incur some costs in holding
                 such a competition and, if another firm is selected, may incur additional
                 initial years’ audit fees and will have additional auditor support costs to
                 assist the new auditor of record in understanding the company’s
                 operations, systems, and financial reporting practices.

               • Requiring audit managers to periodically rotate off the engagement
                 for providing audit services to the public company: Audit manager is a
                 senior position reporting to the engagement audit partner with
                 responsibility for assisting the engagement audit partner in planning,
                 conducting, and reporting on the audit of the public company’s financial
                 statements. Larger audits will likely have multiple audit managers and
                 audit partners participating in the audit. Conceptually, periodically
                 changing audit managers brings a “fresh look” to the audit assignment
                 and the associated potential benefits. However, there is an associated
                 learning curve that is likely to cause both the public accounting firm and
                 the public company to incur some additional costs. Some public
                 accounting firms commented that this practice already occurs as a
                 result of career enhancement policies and practices of the firms.

               • The audit committee periodically obtaining the services of a public
                 accounting firm to assist it in overseeing the financial statement
                 audit or to conduct a forensic audit in areas of the public company’s
                 financial reporting process that present a risk of fraudulent financial



               Page 75                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix III
Potential Value of Practices Other Than
Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation for
Enhancing Auditor Independence and Audit
Quality




   reporting: Overseeing the auditor of record’s conduct of the financial
   statement audit is a significant responsibility that is especially
   challenging depending on the size and complexity of a public company.
   Having another public accounting firm as needed to assist the audit
   committee brings a “fresh look” to help the audit committee understand
   the public company’s operations, systems, and financial reporting
   practices and the underlying internal controls and risks. Also, as areas
   are identified that may have greater risk of fraudulent financial
   reporting, the audit committee may wish to have a public accounting
   firm conduct a forensic audit to provide both a “fresh look” and a more
   penetrating audit of transactions and related internal controls and
   financial reporting practices in areas of high risk. Additional costs will
   be incurred by the audit committee, and some degree of coordination
   and cooperation of the incumbent audit firm will be necessary, which
   will also add to the audit committee’s responsibilities.

• Requiring that the auditor of record be hired on a noncancelable
  multiyear basis, although the public accounting firm could terminate
  the relationship for cause during the contract period: Having the audit
  committee hire the auditor of record on a multiyear basis that only the
  auditor of record can cancel potentially enhances auditor independence
  and audit quality by assisting the auditor in dealing with any pressures
  from management in appropriately dealing with financial reporting
  practices that may materially affect the financial statements. However,
  this practice takes away flexibility of the audit committee to replace the
  auditor of record within the period of the contract should the audit
  committee be dissatisfied with the auditor of record’s performance.

Although many Tier 1 firms, Fortune 1000 public companies, and their audit
committee chairs saw some benefit in each of the alternative practices, in
general, they most frequently reported that the alternative practices would
have limited or little benefit. The most notable exception involved the
practice in which audit committee would hire the auditor of record on a
noncancelable multiyear basis, for which most Fortune 1000 public
companies and their audit committee chairs reported that the practice
would have no benefit. (See table 5.)




Page 76                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                                           Appendix III
                                           Potential Value of Practices Other Than
                                           Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation for
                                           Enhancing Auditor Independence and Audit
                                           Quality




Table 5: Views on Potential Value of Other Practices for Enhancing Auditor Independence and Audit Quality

Numbers in percentages
                                                                            Significant or very        Limited or
                                                                               positive benefit     little benefit   No benefit
Practice 1: Audit committee periodically holding open competition for
providing audit services
    Tier 1 firms                                                                            11                 44            45
    Fortune 1000 public companies                                                           11                 53            36
    Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs                                                     23                 53            24


Practice 2: Requiring periodic rotation of audit managers
    Tier 1 firms                                                                            14                 57            29
    Fortune 1000 public companies                                                           24                 48            28
    Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs                                                     42                 46            12


Practice 3: Audit committee periodically obtaining service of a public
accounting firm to assist in overseeing the financial statement audit
    Tier 1 firms                                                                            20                 53            27
    Fortune 1000 public companies                                                           10                 42            48
    Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs                                                     13                 59            28


Practice 4: Audit committee periodically obtaining service of a public
accounting firm to conduct a forensic audit
    Tier 1 firms                                                                            30                 46            24
    Fortune 1000 public companies                                                           13                 50            37
    Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs                                                     19                 61            20


Practice 5: Audit committee hiring auditor of record on a noncancelable
multiyear basis
    Tier 1 firms                                                                            22                 48            30
    Fortune 1000 public companies                                                            5                 34            61
    Fortune 1000 audit committee chairs                                                      6                 37            57
Source: GAO analysis of survey data.




                                           Page 77                                            GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix IV

Restatements of Annual Financial Statements
for Fortune 1000 Public Companies Due To
Errors or Fraud                                                                                           Appendx
                                                                                                                iIV




              To obtain some insight into the potential value of the “fresh look” provided
              by a new auditor of record, we analyzed the rate of annual financial
              statement restatements reported to the Securities and Exchange
              Commission (SEC) by Fortune 1000 public companies during 2002 and
              2003 through August 31, 2003. We particularly focused on restatements for
              2001 and 2002 and compared the financial statement restatement rates of
              those Fortune 1000 public companies that changed their auditor of record
              to those Fortune 1000 public companies that did not change their auditor of
              record during this period.

              Historically, only about 3 percent of public companies change auditors in
              any given year.1 However, we observed that 2.9 percent (28 out of 9602) of
              the Fortune 1000 public companies changed auditors during 2001 and 21.3
              percent (204 out of 960) of the Fortune 1000 public companies changed
              auditors during 2002. The significant increase from 2001 through 2002 was
              primarily due to the dissolution of Arthur Andersen LLP in 2002, which was
              caused, in part, by its criminal indictment for obstruction of justice
              stemming from its role as auditor of Enron Corporation. Since many of
              these public companies had to replace Andersen as their auditor of record
              during 2002, the number of changes in their auditor of record effectively
              represented a partial form of mandatory audit firm rotation.

              Tables 6 and 7 summarize the occurrence of the reported Fortune 1000
              public companies’ restatement filings.




              1
                R. Doogar (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and R. Easley and D. Ricchiute
              (University of Notre Dame), “Switching Costs, Audit Firm Market Shares and Merger
              Profitability,” (Nov. 20, 2001), which was discussed in GAO-03-864, cited a level of 2.7
              percent annual client switching of auditors based on prior research the authors performed
              using 1981-1997 Compustat data.
              2
                We identified 960 public companies included in the Fortune 1000 for the purpose of
              developing our sampling approach for administering the public company surveys, that is, in
              framing the upper stratum of the population universe.




              Page 78                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix IV
Restatements of Annual Financial
Statements for Fortune 1000 Public
Companies Due To Errors or Fraud




Table 6: Summary Results of the Fortune 1000 Public Companies That Changed
Auditors

Number of companies with restatements due to                             2001      2002
  Rules based changes                                                        0        0
  Errors                                                                     3        7
  Fraud                                                                      0        1
Restatements related to companies that changed auditors                      3        8
Fortune 1000 public companies that changed auditors                        28       204
Restatement rate for companies that changed auditors                    10.7%      3.9%
Source: GAO analysis of restatements.




Table 7: Summary Results of the Fortune 1000 Public Companies That Did Not
Change Auditors

Number of companies with restatements due to                             2001      2002
  Rules based changes                                                       2         1
  Errors                                                                   21         8
  Fraud                                                                     2         1
Restatements related to companies that did not change auditors             25        10
Fortune 1000 public companies that did not change auditors                932       756
Restatement rate for companies that did not change auditors              2.7%      1.3%
Source: GAO analysis of restatements.


The combined restatement rates from tables 6 and 7 for all Fortune 1000
public companies, including those that changed auditors and those that
retained their auditor of record, was 2.9 percent in 2001 (28 restatements
out of the 960 Fortune 1000 public companies) and 1.9 percent in 2002 (18
restatements out of the 960 Fortune 1000 public companies). The overall
restatement rates are higher in 2001 than the comparable levels of
restatements observed in 2002. This may be due to the fact that our
analysis was limited to restatements submitted to the SEC on Form 10-KA
filings for 2001 and 2002 through August 31, 2003. Some of the Fortune
1000 public companies that had not filed restatements with the SEC as of
August 31, 2003, may still do so in the future. Additionally, because some
companies may require considerable amounts of time and effort to unravel
complex accounting and financial reporting issues (e.g., WorldCom, which
is in the process of working its way out of bankruptcy proceedings, and the
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, better known as Freddie Mac,
which is working to restate 3 years of previously issued financial



Page 79                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix IV
Restatements of Annual Financial
Statements for Fortune 1000 Public
Companies Due To Errors or Fraud




statements), it is reasonable to expect that additional restatements will be
included in Form 10-KAs or other filings that had not been submitted to the
SEC as of August 31, 2003.

Financial statement restatements filed for changes in accounting principles
or changes in organizational business structure (e.g., stock splits, mergers
and acquisitions), reclassifications, or compliance with SEC reporting
requirements, referred to as “rules based changes,” are not necessarily
indications of compromised audit quality or auditor independence.
However, financial statement restatements due to errors or fraud raise
doubt about the integrity of management’s financial reporting practices, the
quality of the audits, and the auditor’s independence. Therefore, the
following focus of our analysis was on annual financial statement
restatements (hereinafter referred to as “restatements”) due to errors or
fraud.

The rate of restatement due to errors or fraud for Fortune 1000 public
companies that changed auditors were 10.7 percent in 2001 and 3.9 percent
in 2002 compared to restatement rates due to errors or fraud of 2.5 percent
in 2001 and 1.2 percent in 2002 for companies that did not change auditors.
Although the data indicate that the overall restatement rate is
approximately four3 times higher in 2001 and three times higher in 20024 for
those Fortune 1000 public companies that changed auditors than for those
companies that did not change auditors, caution should be exercised as
further analysis would be needed in order to determine whether the
restatements are associated with the “fresh look” of the new auditor
attributed to mandatory audit firm rotation. In that respect, in some cases
we were able to determine from our review of the Form 10-KAs, any related
Form 8-Ks, and the results of Internet news searches, that the restatements
were identified as a result of an SEC investigation or an enforcement
action. However, for the majority of the restatements we identified, the
information included in the SEC’s EDGAR system did not provide sufficient
information to ascertain whether company management, and in those

3
  The 10.7 percent rate of restatements due to errors or fraud of the Fortune 1000 public
companies that changed auditors in 2001 was approximately 4.25 times higher than the 2.5
percent rate of restatements due to errors or fraud of the Fortune 1000 public companies
that did not change auditors.
4
  The 3.9 percent rate of restatements due to errors or fraud of the Fortune 1000 public
companies that changed auditors in 2002 was approximately 3.25 times higher than the 1.2
percent rate of restatements due to errors or fraud of the Fortune 1000 public companies
that did not change auditors.




Page 80                                               GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                             Appendix IV
                             Restatements of Annual Financial
                             Statements for Fortune 1000 Public
                             Companies Due To Errors or Fraud




                             cases where there was a change in auditor, the predecessor auditor, or the
                             successor auditor identified the error or fraud and whether it was identified
                             before or after the change in auditor. Also, the recent corporate financial
                             reporting failures have greatly increased the pressures on management and
                             auditors regarding honest, fair, and complete financial reporting.



Effect of Restatements Due   The phrase in an auditor’s unqualified opinion, “present fairly, in all
to Errors or Fraud           material respects, in conformity with generally accepted accounting
                             principles,” indicates the auditor’s belief that the financial statements taken
                             as a whole are not materially misstated. An auditor plans an audit to obtain
                             reasonable assurance of detecting misstatements that could be large
                             enough, individually or in the aggregate, to be quantitatively material to the
                             financial statements.5 Financial statements are materially misstated when
                             they contain misstatements the effect of which, individually or in the
                             aggregate, is important enough to cause them not to be presented fairly, in
                             all material respects, in conformity with generally accepted accounting
                             principles. As previously noted, misstatements can result from errors or
                             fraud. As defined in Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement of
                             Financial Concepts No. 2, materiality represents the magnitude of an
                             omission or misstatement of an item in a financial report that, in light of
                             surrounding circumstances, makes it probable that the judgment of a
                             reasonable person relying on the information would have been changed or
                             influenced by the inclusion or correction of the item.

                             Table 8 summarizes the net dollar effect of the restatements due to errors
                             or fraud on the reported net income (loss) of all 43 companies’ previously
                             issued annual financial statements for the fiscal years, calendar years, or
                             both ended from 1997 through 2002.6




                             5
                               Although the auditor should be alert for misstatements that could be qualitatively material,
                             it ordinarily is not practical to design procedures to detect them. Section 326 of the AICPA’s
                             Statement on Auditing Standards states that “an auditor typically works within economic
                             limits; his or her opinion, to be economically useful, must be formed within a reasonable
                             length of time and at reasonable cost.”
                             6
                               The restatement of one of the 43 companies that submitted restatements due to errors or
                             fraud related to financial statements that were originally issued in 1995. However, we were
                             unable to quantify the dollar effect of the restatements associated with these financial
                             statements because the SEC’s EDGAR system did not include financial statements filed
                             prior to 1997.




                             Page 81                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                                                  Appendix IV
                                                  Restatements of Annual Financial
                                                  Statements for Fortune 1000 Public
                                                  Companies Due To Errors or Fraud




Table 8: Summary of Net Dollar Effect of Restatements Due to Errors and Fraud

Dollars in millions
                                          1997                1998              1999        2000                2001             2002
Net effect of restatements              ($69.2)             ($71.2)        ($1,387.0)    ($821.4)           ($456.3)          ($124.8)
Net income (loss),
previously reported                     $337.4              $316.4         $11,054.7    $12,234.2          ($1,234.4)         ($640.2)
Misstatement rate                       (20.5)%             (22.5)%          (12.5)%       (6.7)%            (37.0)%          (19.5)%
Source: GAO analysis of restatements.


                                                  The misstatement rates associated with these 43 companies’ previously
                                                  issued statements of net income (loss), which ranged from a 6.7 percent
                                                  overstatement of net income (loss) for 2000 to a 37.0 percent
                                                  understatement of net income (loss) for 2001, would clearly be considered
                                                  material enough to have affected the fair presentation of the results of
                                                  operations included in these 43 companies’ financial statements.
                                                  Accordingly, it is probable that the judgment of a reasonable person relying
                                                  on the information included in these companies’ previously issued financial
                                                  statements would have been changed or influenced by the inclusion of
                                                  omitted information or correction of misstated items due to errors or fraud.




                                                  Page 82                                           GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix V

International Experience with Mandatory
Audit Firm Rotation                                                                                       Append
                                                                                                               x
                                                                                                               i
                                                                                                               V




Italy         Italy has required mandatory audit firm rotation of listed companies since
              1975 in which the audit engagement may be retendered (recompeting for
              providing audit services) every 3 years and the same public accounting firm
              may serve as the auditor of record for a maximum of 9 years. In addition,
              there is a minimum time lag of 3 years before the predecessor auditor can
              return. The mandatory audit firm rotation requirement was intended to
              safeguard the independence of public accounting firms. In a meeting with
              IOSCO Standing Committee one member, the Italian representative from
              Commissione Nazionale per le Societa e la Borsa (CONSOB), the Italian
              securities regulator, indicated that Italy’s experience with mandatory audit
              firm rotation has been a good one, noting that mandatory audit firm
              rotation gives the appearance of independence, which is considered very
              important to maintaining investor confidence. However, it was also noted
              that there have been negative impacts, when after 3 years, there is fee
              pressure by the listed company on the audit firm that contributes to
              reduced audit fees. In responding to our survey, CONSOB’s representative
              indicated that there has been a progressive reduction in audit fees, which
              has given rise to concern over audit firms’ ability to maintain adequate
              levels of audit services and quality control.

              Research in Italy1 concludes that mandatory audit firm rotation carries
              significant threats to audit quality from competitive pressures. However,
              the CONSOB raised concerns about the study’s methodology, accuracy,
              data used, and appropriateness of the conclusions. Our review of the
              executive summary of the study also identified potential limitations on the
              reliability of data used and methodological concerns that created
              uncertainties about the study’s conclusions.2 Italy has also considered
              partner rotation; however, because Italy is currently considering reducing
              the maximum auditor tenure from 9 years to 6 years, partner rotation has
              not been given further consideration.




              1
                SDA Universita Bocconi Corporate Finance and Real Estate Department and
              Administration and Control Department, The Impact of Mandatory Audit Rotation on
              Audit Quality and on Audit Pricing: The Case Of Italy (Executive Summary).
              2
                The authors of the SDA Universita Bocconi study did not respond to our request to provide
              us additional information about the reliability of data that were used and the methodological
              approach.




              Page 83                                                 GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
            Appendix V
            International Experience with Mandatory
            Audit Firm Rotation




Brazil      Brazil enacted a mandatory audit firm rotation requirement in May 1999
            with a 5-year maximum term and minimum time lag of 3 years before the
            predecessor auditor of record can return. The Comissao de Valores
            Mobiliarios (CVM), which is the Brazilian Securities Commission, indicated
            that the primary reason mandatory audit firm rotation was enacted was to
            strengthen audit supervision following accounting fraud at two banks
            (Banco Economico and Banco Nacional). Brazil does not have a partner
            rotation requirement, as the CVM believes that the requirement of rotating
            audit firms is stronger than changing partners within firms. However, as a
            component of its mandatory audit firm rotation requirement, Brazil
            prohibits an individual auditor who changes audit firms to audit the same
            corporations previously audited.



Singapore   Starting in March 2002, the Monetary Authority of Singapore stipulated that
            banks incorporated in Singapore should not appoint the same public
            accounting firm for more than 5 consecutive financial years. However, this
            requirement does not apply to foreign banks operating in Singapore. Banks
            incorporated in Singapore that have had the same public accounting firm
            for more than 5 years have until 2006 to change their audit firms. While a
            “time out” period is not stipulated, banks incorporated in Singapore shall
            not, except with the prior written approval of the Monetary Authority of
            Singapore, appoint the same audit firm for more than 5 consecutive years.
            In addition, listed companies are required under the Listing Rules of the
            Singapore Exchange to rotate audit partners-in-charge every 5 years.

            The primary reason Singapore instituted mandatory audit firm rotation for
            local banks was to promote the independence and effectiveness of external
            audits. In addition, mandatory audit firm rotation for local banks was cited
            by Singapore’s officials as a measure to help (1) safeguard against public
            accounting firms having an excessive focus on maintaining long-term
            commercial relationships with the banks they audit, which could make the
            firms too committed or beholden to the banks, (2) maintain the
            professionalism of audit firms—where with long-term relationships, audit
            firms run the risk of compromising their objectivity by identifying too
            closely with the banks’ practices and cultures, and (3) bring a fresh
            perspective to the audit process—where with long-term relationships,
            public accounting firms might become less alert to subtle but important
            changes in the bank’s circumstances.




            Page 84                                      GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
                 Appendix V
                 International Experience with Mandatory
                 Audit Firm Rotation




Austria          In Austria, Austrian Commercial Law will require mandatory audit firm
                 rotation every 6 years to strengthen the quality of audits and to enhance
                 auditor independence by limiting the time of doing business between the
                 audited company and its auditor of record. The 6-year mandatory audit
                 firm rotation requirement will become effective from the beginning of the
                 year 2004, and there will be a minimum time lag of 1 year before the
                 predecessor auditor of record can return. Austria does not have a partner
                 rotation requirement; however, anyone who serves as the audit partner of a
                 public company for 6 consecutive years will not be allowed to continue to
                 serve in that capacity by becoming employed by the company’s successor
                 auditor.



United Kingdom   In January 2003, the United Kingdom adopted the recommendations of the
                 Co-ordinating Group on Audit and Accounting Issues (CGAA)3 to
                 strengthen the audit partner rotation requirements by reducing the
                 maximum period for rotation of the lead audit partner from 7 years to 5
                 years. The United Kingdom also adopted CGAA’s recommendation to limit
                 the maximum period for rotation of the other key audit partners to 7 years.
                 According to the CGAA report, the rotation of the audit engagement
                 partner has been a requirement in the United Kingdom for many years, and
                 the United Kingdom concluded that the requirements for the rotation of
                 audit partners played an important role in upholding auditor independence.

                 With respect to the issue of mandatory audit firm rotation, the United
                 Kingdom supports CGAA’s recommendations, which concluded that the
                 balance of advantage is against requiring the mandatory rotation of audit
                 firms. The primary arguments against mandatory audit firm rotation, as
                 cited in the CGAA report, include the possible negative effects on audit
                 quality and effectiveness in the first years following a change, the
                 substantial costs resulting from a requirement to switch auditors regularly,
                 the lack of strong evidence of a positive impact on audit quality, the
                 potential difficulty or impossibility of identifying a willing and able audit
                 firm that can accept the audit without violating independence requirements


                 3
                   The CGAA was established by the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Secretary of State
                 for Trade and Industry to ensure that there is a coordinated and comprehensive work
                 program for individual regulators to review the United Kingdom’s current regulatory
                 arrangements for statutory audit and financial reporting, avoiding any unnecessary overlap;
                 commission additional work or reviews if judged appropriate; and reach a view on the
                 adequacy of the proposals, and, if appropriate, make specific recommendations.




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         Appendix V
         International Experience with Mandatory
         Audit Firm Rotation




         in a concentrated listed company audit market, and competitive
         implications of such a requirement. However, CGAA also recommended
         that audit committees should consider changing their auditor of record
         when the audit tenure is from 15 years to 20 years.



France   In France, audit partner rotation had been required since 1998 by the
         French Code of Ethics of the accounting profession. However, the
         requirement was not enforceable because the Code of Ethics had not
         specified any maximum length for mandatory rotation of audit partners. In
         August 2003, France promulgated the French Act on Strengthening of
         Financial Security, which makes it illegal for an audit partner to sign more
         than six annual audit reports. The main requirement that serves as an
         alternative to mandatory audit firm rotation is the French requirement of
         having two firms engaged in the audit of entities issuing consolidated
         financial statements, which has been a requirement since 1985 and has
         been reincluded in the August 2003 promulgation of the French Act on
         Strengthening of Financial Security. According to the Deputy Chief
         Accountant of the Commission des Operations de Bourse, mandatory audit
         firm rotation is not required in France primarily because of concern over
         the potential impairment of audit quality due to the new auditor’s lack of
         knowledge of the company’s operations.



Spain    The Comision Nacional del Mercaso de Valores (CNMV)—the agency in
         charge of supervising and inspecting the Spanish stock markets and the
         activities of all the participants in those markets—indicated that from 1989
         through 1995, Spain had a mandatory audit firm rotation requirement with
         a maximum audit term of 9 years, which included mandatory retendering
         every 3 years. The main objectives of this former requirement were to
         enhance auditors’ independence and promotion of fair competition.
         However, in 1995, the Spanish “Company Law” and the Spanish “Audit Law”
         were amended, effectively eliminating the mandatory audit firm rotation
         requirement, by allowing that “after the expiration of the initial period
         (minimum 3 years, maximum 9 years), the same auditor could be re-hired
         by the shareholders on an annual basis.” The Director of the CNMV
         indicated that the 9-year mandatory audit firm rotation requirement was
         abandoned since the main objective of increased competition among audit
         firms had been achieved and because of listed companies’ increased
         training costs incurred with a complete new team of auditors from a new
         public accounting firm. In November 2002, the Spanish “Audit Law” was
         amended to introduce a new requirement under which “all audit-engaged


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                  Appendix V
                  International Experience with Mandatory
                  Audit Firm Rotation




                  team” members (including audit partners, managers, supervisors, and
                  junior staff) have to rotate every 7 years in certain types of companies,
                  which include all listed companies, companies subject to public
                  supervision, and companies with annual revenues over 30 million euros.



The Netherlands   In January 2003, the Royal Nederlands Instituut van Register Accountants
                  (NIvRA) and Nederlandse Orde van Accountants-Administratieconsulenten
                  (NOvAA) of the Netherlands, which are the bodies that represent the
                  accounting profession in the Netherlands and are responsible for the
                  qualifications and regulation of the accounting profession, adopted the
                  recommendation of CGAA to strengthen the audit partner rotation
                  requirements by reducing the maximum period for rotation of the
                  engagement audit partner from 7 years to 5 years and to limit the maximum
                  period for rotation of the other key audit partners to 7 years. The adoption
                  of these measures by both NIvRA and NOvAA made these requirements a
                  part of the code of conduct for auditors. A representative of the
                  Netherlands Authority for the Financial Markets indicated that the Dutch
                  government is in the process of promulgating these audit partner rotation
                  regulations into law, where the requirement will only apply to public
                  interest entities.



Japan             In Japan, the Amended Certified Public Accountant Law was passed in May
                  2003, and beginning on April 1, 2004, audit partners and reviewing partners
                  will be prohibited from being engaged in auditing the same listed company
                  over a period of 7 consecutive years. Mandatory audit firm rotation has
                  never been required in Japan, and public companies have never been
                  encouraged to voluntarily pursue audit firm rotation. While Japan agreed
                  with the December 2002 report issued by the Subcommittee on Regulations
                  of Certified Public Accountants of the Financial System Council that
                  mandatory audit firm rotation will need further consideration in the future,
                  Japan’s securities regulator stated that mandatory audit firm rotation was
                  not supported because of the concerns that it (1) may cause confusion
                  given the concentration of audit business held by large public accounting
                  firms, (2) is not required in other major countries other than Italy, (3) may
                  significantly lower the quality of audits due to the need to arrange newly
                  organized audits, and (4) would result in greater cost of implementation
                  under the current concentration of audit business held by large public
                  accounting firms.




                  Page 87                                       GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
         Appendix V
         International Experience with Mandatory
         Audit Firm Rotation




Canada   There are currently no Canadian requirements for mandatory audit firm
         rotation. However, mandatory audit firm rotation was included in banking
         legislation shortly after the 1923 failure of the Home Bank and up to the
         December 1991 revision of the Bank Act. The Bank Act required that two
         firms audit a chartered bank, but that the same two firms could not
         perform more than two consecutive audits. As a result, one of the two
         firms would have to rotate off the audit for a minimum of 2 years.

         According to Canadian officials, in practice this requirement was
         implemented in two different ways. Some banks appointed a panel of three
         audit firms with one of the three firms being a permanent auditor while the
         other two firms rotated every 2 years. Other banks appointed a panel of
         three audit firms and rotated among the three firms. Generally, the firm
         that was in its “off year” did not completely step away from the audit of the
         bank and would maintain at least a watch on developments in the bank’s
         business and financial reporting to ensure that it was knowledgeable
         enough to step back in when it rotated on again.

         One of the primary benefits of the system was believed to be that the use of
         two firms facilitated an independent review of the loan portfolio. This new
         perspective was generally considered to be a useful safeguard, and it was
         believed that the second firm would not bring with it an element of
         additional cost. The rotation element of the system was considered to
         bring with it an additional element of security by ensuring that issues were
         reviewed regularly by auditors with a fresh perspective, thus minimizing
         the risk of a problem festering because an issue was decided on and not
         reevaluated.

         Since the 1923 failure of the Home Bank, the dual auditor requirement with
         mandatory audit firm rotation for one of the two audit firms every 2 years
         was in place for over 60 years and was considered to be one of the key
         safeguards in the bank governance system. However, in 1985 two regional
         banks in the province of Alberta failed despite the existence of the dual
         auditor system. A subsequent government inquiry into the failures found
         that the Office of the Inspector General of Banks, now the Office of the
         Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), heavily relied on the
         external auditors and recommended the need for some direct examination
         by the supervisor of the quality of banks’ loan portfolios. Until 1991, only
         Canadian banks were required to rotate their auditor of record. In 1991, in
         line with a push for harmonized supervision, banking legislation was
         amended to reduce the requirement to one audit firm, and the mandatory
         audit firm rotation requirement was abandoned with the revision of the


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          Appendix V
          International Experience with Mandatory
          Audit Firm Rotation




          Bank Act. According to Canadian officials, one of the reasons for the
          abandonment was that many argued that the cost was not matched by the
          benefits and it was noted that Canada seemed to be largely alone in the
          world imposing such a system. There were few strong advocates for
          retaining the system, but questions were raised as to whether it was in fact
          a valuable element of protecting the safety and soundness of the banking
          system.

          Mandatory audit firm rotation is not currently being considered in Canada.
          Instead, as of July 2003, mandatory rotation of audit partners for all public
          companies was being considered by Canada’s securities regulator,
          supported by a new model of independent oversight and inspection of
          auditors of public companies. The accounting profession, through the
          Public Interest and Integrity Committee of the Canadian Institute of
          Chartered Accountants and in collaboration with provincial institutes, is
          considering developing an updated independence standard that considers
          certain requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act for Canadian application to
          listed financial institutions regulated by OSFI. This independence standard
          will focus on mandatory rotation of the engagement partner rather than the
          firm auditing a listed enterprise regulated by OSFI, as well as other key
          members of the firm involved with the audit. According to Canadian
          officials, extending this requirement to nonlisted financial institutions is
          under consideration but the outcome will not be known for some time.



Germany   In Germany, according to the German Commercial Code, a qualified auditor
          or certified accounting firm, beginning with annual financial statements
          issued after December 31, 2001, may not be an auditor of a stock
          corporation that has issued officially listed shares if it employs a certified
          accountant who has signed the certification concerning the examination of
          the annual financial statements or the consolidated financial statements of
          the corporation more than six times in the 10 years prior to the fiscal year
          to be examined. According to German officials, the principle of audit
          partner rotation has proven to be successful, and there are no plans to
          switch to a model based on mandatory audit firm rotation because the
          purpose of guaranteeing an independent audit of the financial statements
          of a company can be efficiently achieved by audit partner rotation.
          However, in order to improve investor protection and company integrity,
          Germany’s federal government published a 10-point paper, which included
          a planned amendment to the corresponding Commercial Code regulations
          to shorten the period of time after which an auditor of record must rotate




          Page 89                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix V
International Experience with Mandatory
Audit Firm Rotation




to every 5 years and to include all responsible audit partners in the rotation
requirement.




Page 90                                        GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
Appendix VI

GAO Contacts and Staff Acknowledgments                                                         Appendx
                                                                                                     iVI




GAO Contacts      Jeanette M. Franzel, (202) 512-9471
                  John J. Reilly, Jr., (202) 512-9517



Staff             In addition to those individuals named above, William E. Boutboul,
                  Cheryl E. Clark, Robert W. Gramling, Wilfred B. Holloway,
Acknowledgments   Michael C. Hrapsky, Catherine M. Hurley, Charles E. Norfleet,
                  Judy K. Pagano, Sidney H. Schwartz, Jason O. Strange,
                  Partricia A. Summers, and Walter K. Vance made key contributions to this
                  report.




(194346)          Page 91                                     GAO-04-216 Public Accounting Firms
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