oversight

Medicaid and CHIP: Considerations for Express Lane Eligibility

Published by the Government Accountability Office on 2012-12-05.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

United States Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548



           December 5, 2012

           The Honorable Max Baucus
           Chairman
           Committee on Finance
           United States Senate

           Subject: Medicaid and CHIP: Considerations for Express Lane Eligibility

           Dear Mr. Chairman:

           Each year, millions of children do not have health insurance coverage even though
           they are eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP),
           two joint federal-state programs that provide health insurance to certain low-income
           individuals. 1 Additionally, each year, some children lose Medicaid or CHIP coverage
           for which they are eligible and then, after a short coverage gap, reenroll—a process
           that is costly to the programs administratively, as well as burdensome for families. 2
           The Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA)
           provided states with new incentives and tools to simplify eligibility determinations
           and increase the enrollment and retention of children in Medicaid and CHIP. One of
           these tools is Express Lane Eligibility (ELE), which allows states to determine
           eligibility for children in Medicaid or CHIP by using certain information, such as
           information from other public-assistance programs that enroll children. 3 Specifically,
           within certain limits, ELE allows a state Medicaid or CHIP agency to use another

           1
            Medicaid finances health insurance for certain categories of individuals, including low-income
           children; CHIP is an insurance program for certain low-income, uninsured children whose family
           income is too high for Medicaid. Under Medicaid and CHIP, states pay qualified health care providers
           for covered services given to enrolled beneficiaries, and then seek reimbursement for the federal
           share of those payments.
           In fiscal year 2010, 34.4 million children had health coverage through Medicaid, and 7.7 million
           children had health care coverage through CHIP, while approximately 8 million children were
           uninsured. The specific factors considered in determining eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP vary
           across states and generally involve income, disability status, residency, age, and citizenship.
           2
            For example, many children who are still eligible lose coverage because the family failed to respond
           accurately or on time to notices to renew eligibility (children’s enrollment must be renewed at least
           once a year). Some children disenroll from CHIP or Medicaid because they are no longer eligible or
           obtain private coverage.
           3
            Pub. L. No. 111-3, § 203(a), 123 Stat. 8, 40 (2009) (codified, as amended, at 42 U.S.C.
           § 1396a(e)(13)). Under CHIPRA, the ELE option may only be used for Medicaid and CHIP eligibility
           determinations for children and cannot be used for parents or other adults. CHIPRA established new
           performance bonuses for states adopting at least five of eight specified policies to simplify Medicaid
           and CHIP enrollment and retention procedures for children; one of the specified policies was ELE.
           States are eligible for these performance bonuses for fiscal years 2009 through 2013. See Pub. L.
           No. 111-3, § 104, 123 Stat. 8, 17-23.



           Page 1                                                       GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
entity’s findings—in other words, determinations of fact, such as the family’s
income—when evaluating a child’s eligibility for Medicaid or CHIP, as long as those
findings were made within a reasonable period. These other entities, called Express
Lane Agencies, are defined to include public agencies that determine eligibility for
certain assistance programs, such as the National School Lunch Program, the
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly called the Food Stamp
Program), the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF), and Head
Start. 4 Under ELE, a state Medicaid or CHIP agency may rely on an Express Lane
Agency’s findings even if the Express Lane Agency uses a different method than
Medicaid or CHIP to derive those findings. 5

If a state opts to implement ELE, it selects the agency from which it will obtain a
finding, chooses the finding it will use (e.g., income, household size, or residency),
and decides whether it will use that finding for initial eligibility determinations,
renewals, or both. 6 For example, a state may choose to evaluate a child’s initial
eligibility for Medicaid using the state SNAP agency’s calculation of net income.
Children may be found eligible for Medicaid or CHIP using ELE, however, they may
not be denied eligibility using ELE. Instead, CHIPRA requires states to evaluate the
eligibility of children who are found ineligible through ELE using their regular
Medicaid or CHIP procedures. To implement ELE, states must obtain approval from
the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the agency within the
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that is responsible for overseeing
state Medicaid and CHIP programs at the federal level. To provide additional
oversight of ELE, CHIPRA required that HHS conduct, by contract, grant, or
interagency agreement, a comprehensive independent evaluation of ELE and report
the results of this evaluation to Congress by September 30, 2012. 7 This evaluation
had not been issued as of November 29, 2012. CHIPRA also requires that states
annually calculate and report on the rate of erroneous payments for children enrolled




4
 Each state Medicaid or CHIP agency must decide which other agencies are capable of making
determinations for one or more of the eligibility requirements for their Medicaid or CHIP programs.
Accordingly, a state’s Medicaid or CHIP program may use different Express Lane Agencies and may
select more than one.
5
 For example, methods for calculating income within each state may differ across programs and
implementing entities. In determining program eligibility, some entities may include variables such as
court-ordered child support payments or income earned by 19-year-olds as part of a family’s income,
while other entities do not.
6
 State Medicaid and CHIP programs using ELE, however, must verify the citizenship or nationality
status of children using their regular procedures. If a state determines that children would otherwise
be eligible for Medicaid or CHIP using findings from an Express Lane Agency, children must be
enrolled pending the documentation of citizenship or nationality. (In addition to documentation, states
have the option of establishing citizenship through a match with the Social Security Administration.)
7
 Pub. L. No. 111-3, § 203(b), 123 Stat at 46-47. HHS contracted with Mathematica Policy Research—
which subcontracted with the Urban Institute and Health Management Associates—to conduct a
comprehensive evaluation of ELE. This evaluation will be completed through the issuance of several
reports. The first report, which was to have been issued by September 30, 2012, was to include
analyses of the effects of ELE on administrative costs (such as savings in time or money) and
enrollment. Two additional reports, scheduled to be released in 2013, are expected to consist of a
report with recommendations for legislative or administrative changes for ELE, and a final report with
analyses based on updated and expanded data.



Page 2                                                     GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
through ELE. 8 CHIPRA authorized ELE from 2009 through September 30, 2013.
Accordingly, unless reauthorized, CMS will not approve any state plan amendments
for ELE after this date. 9 Between 2009 and November 2012, 13 states received
approval to implement ELE for Medicaid, CHIP, or both. Seven of these states have
been approved to use ELE for less than 2 years.

Because CHIPRA’s authorization for ELE is scheduled to expire on September 30,
2013, Congress may consider whether or not to reauthorize it. You asked us to
provide information about ELE, including whether ELE, if available, would be useful
to states in implementing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). 10
Among other things, PPACA provides for the expansion of Medicaid eligibility to
certain previously ineligible adults. 11 This report compiles some key considerations
related to the availability of ELE beyond September 30, 2013.

To compile some key considerations related to the availability of ELE beyond
September 2013, we reviewed relevant federal laws, including provisions of CHIPRA
and PPACA, regulations, and guidance; reviewed publicly available reports on ELE,
including preliminary information from the CHIPRA-mandated evaluation of ELE; and
interviewed officials from HHS, representatives of organizations that represent
states, and representatives from selected stakeholder organizations. 12 We gathered
information regarding outcomes of states’ ELE implementations that were detailed in
publicly available reports; we did not evaluate the methods or data sources used for
those reports, nor did we conduct original analyses of data. We also reviewed our


8
 CHIPRA requires states to compute error rates associated with ELE by conducting full Medicaid
eligibility reviews on a statistically valid sample of children enrolled using findings from an Express
Lane Agency and to report the rate of erroneous excess payments to CMS annually. 42 U.S.C.
§ 1396a(e)(13)(E).
9
 States administer and operate their Medicaid and CHIP programs in accordance with state plans that
must be approved by CMS. To implement ELE, a state must submit a state plan amendment to CMS
for approval.
10
  Pub. L. No. 111-148, 124 Stat. 119 (2010), as amended by the Health Care and Education
Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HCERA), Pub. L. No. 111-152, 124 Stat. 1029. For purposes of this
report, references to PPACA include the amendments made by HCERA.
11
  PPACA provides for states to expand Medicaid coverage to nonpregnant, nonelderly individuals
with income at or below 133 percent of the federal poverty level beginning no later than January 1,
2014. PPACA also provides for a 5 percent income disregard when calculating modified adjusted
gross income for determining Medicaid eligibility, which effectively increases this income level to
138 percent of the federal poverty level. Federal poverty levels are based on federal poverty
guidelines issued by HHS on an annual basis. These guidelines provide income thresholds that vary
across states and by family size.
12
  Specifically, within HHS we spoke with officials from CMS, CMS’s Tribal Affairs Group, and HHS’s
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Among organizations that represent
states, we spoke with representatives from the National Association of Medicaid Directors and the
National Conference of State Legislatures. Representatives we spoke with from selected stakeholder
organizations were those that have conducted research or issued reports or briefs on ELE and
included the Center for Children & Families of the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, the
Children’s Partnership, Enroll America, the Kaiser Family Foundation, Mathematica Policy Research,
the National Academy for State Health Policy, and the Urban Institute. We also contacted
representatives from the American Public Human Services Association and the National Governor’s
Association, whose representatives indicated that they did not have any information to share on ELE.
To minimize overlap with other ongoing or recent evaluations of ELE, we did not interview state
officials.



Page 3                                                       GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
previous reports, including our November 2012 report on access to Medicaid. 13
Results from any one ELE implementation cannot be generalized to other
implementations because of differences between states in how ELE was
implemented (e.g., whether it was for initial enrollment or for renewals) and
differences between states in how they make eligibility determinations in the
absence of ELE.

We conducted this performance audit from June 2012 to December 2012, in
accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. Those
standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate
evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on
our audit objectives. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable
basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives.

Results in Brief

Four key considerations related to ELE’s availability beyond 2013 include (1) the
potential for administrative savings; (2) effects on enrollment of eligible, but not
enrolled, children; (3) states’ level of interest in using ELE particularly for
implementing PPACA; and (4) uncertainty regarding the potential for erroneous
excess payments for children enrolled through ELE.

•    Available information regarding administrative savings associated with ELE
     suggests that ELE could save time and reduce administrative costs. For
     example, a study that compared the cost of enrolling children using ELE in
     Louisiana with the cost of enrolling and renewing children by using the state’s
     traditional process estimated savings of $9.0 million to $12.9 million during the
     first year of implementation.

•    Available information also suggests that ELE could have beneficial effects on
     enrollment, but the extent to which it will do so will depend on how it is
     implemented. For example, South Carolina renewed 65,000 children using ELE
     during the first 6 months of its ELE implementation.

•    Stakeholders we spoke with generally believed that states currently using ELE
     would be interested in continuing to do so, for example, to avoid having to
     change their Medicaid or CHIP enrollment or renewal processes. Although
     current ELE authority under CHIPRA applies only to children, stakeholders noted
     benefits if ELE could be used for adults—a group for which Medicaid coverage is
     expanded under PPACA—such as the administrative savings of enrolling
     children and their parents at the same time or of enrolling newly eligible adults.
     Stakeholders also noted that some states may not have been interested in
     implementing ELE because they are busy implementing changes required by
     PPACA, or because they may be concerned about ELE’s scheduled expiration.




13
 GAO, Medicaid: States Made Multiple Program Changes, and Beneficiaries Generally Reported
Access Comparable to Private Insurance, GAO-13-55 (Washington, D.C.: Nov.15, 2012).



Page 4                                               GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
•    Whether ELE may have resulted in erroneous excess payments for children
     enrolled through ELE is uncertain. As of November 2012, CMS had not issued
     guidance on how to determine ELE errors and calculate such payments, pending
     other agency priorities in implementing PPACA. If the ELE option is continued, it
     will be particularly important that CMS issue such guidance, as questions have
     been raised by states and others regarding how an ELE error should be defined.

Background

States have the flexibility to design ELE implementations to increase enrollment and
retention in their Medicaid or CHIP programs in a way that meets their unique needs.
The particular way in which a state designs its ELE implementation can reflect
specific state goals or particular considerations regarding potential Express Lane
Agencies. For example, a state’s ELE goals could include simplifying the eligibility
determinations made by the state or targeting the state’s outreach to groups of
eligible uninsured children served by other entities. A state’s considerations in
selecting an Express Lane Agency could include an assessment of the reliability of
the agency’s data, 14 the extent to which children served by a potential Express Lane
Agency are already enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP, and existing collaborations or
data-sharing agreements.

States opting to implement ELE must submit a Medicaid or CHIP state plan
amendment (or both) to CMS for approval. 15 The state plan amendment must
identify key features such as the Express Lane Agency; the finding or findings that
will be used; and whether the option will be used for initial enrollment, renewals, or
both. As of November 9, 2012, 13 states had received CMS approval to implement
ELE in their Medicaid program (5 states), CHIP program (2 states), or both (6
states). 16 These ELE implementations have been in place for different amounts of
time. After CHIPRA’s enactment in 2009, 2 states received approval to implement
ELE in 2009, 4 states received approval in 2010, 3 states received approval in 2011,
and 4 states received approval in 2012. As of November 2012, one additional state
plan amendment for ELE implementation was under review, from a state that
already has approval for another ELE implementation and is seeking to broaden its
use of ELE.



14
  We have previously reported on issues related to the reliability of data from certain agencies that
can be selected as Express Lane Agencies, including SNAP and the National School Lunch program.
For example, in 2012 we reported that SNAP and the National School Lunch program were among
the top 10 programs with the highest reported amounts of improper payment dollar estimates in fiscal
year 2011. Incomplete or inaccurate reporting of income by participants was reported as one of the
primary reasons for the SNAP improper payments. See GAO, Improper Payments: Remaining
Challenges and Strategies for Governmentwide Reduction Efforts, GAO-12-573T (Washington, D.C.:
Mar. 28, 2012), 7.
15
  State plans describe how the states will operate their Medicaid and CHIP programs and detail
eligibility criteria and other key information. A state must submit any changes it wishes to make to its
plan, such as revisions to eligibility criteria, to CMS for review and approval as a state plan
amendment.
16
 The 13 states that had received CMS approval to implement ELE were Alabama, Colorado,
Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania,
South Carolina, and Utah.



Page 5                                                       GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
Key Considerations Include Administrative Savings, States’ Level of Interest,
and Uncertainty Regarding the Potential for Erroneous Excess Payments

Information Regarding Administrative Savings with ELE

As of September 2012, the available information regarding administrative savings
associated with ELE was largely about two states (Louisiana and South Carolina)
and suggested that ELE could save time and reduce costs. In addition, in a recent
report, we noted that several states reported that ELE contributed to decreases in
the average time taken to process new Medicaid applications. The CHIPRA-
mandated evaluation of ELE is expected to provide more complete information about
administrative savings based on analyses of data from six states that implemented
ELE. Preliminary results of that evaluation suggest that ELE does have the potential
to yield administrative savings, the extent to which will depend on how it is
implemented.

An analysis of Louisiana’s ELE implementation conducted by the Urban Institute
indicated that Louisiana’s Medicaid program realized between $15 and $22 in
administrative savings for each dollar it spent to create ELE infrastructure. 17 To
create the infrastructure for its ELE program Louisiana spent almost $600,000. State
officials told the Urban Institute that the administrative costs for an initial
determination of eligibility for Medicaid through Louisiana’s traditional processes
were about $116 per application, compared to between $12 and $15 per application
through its ELE program. The Urban Institute estimated that this differential allowed
the state to save between $1.0 million and $1.1 million on initial enrollment costs
during 2010, the first year that Louisiana implemented ELE. Administrative costs for
renewal in Medicaid through Louisiana’s traditional processes were $51 to $76 per
application, but renewal was estimated to cost nothing through ELE. The Urban
Institute estimated that this differential allowed the state to save between $8.0 million
and $11.9 million on renewals during the first full year of renewals. Therefore the
estimated combined savings for ELE initial enrollments and renewals range from
$9.0 million to $12.9 million, or $15 to $22 in administrative savings for each dollar of
initial investment. 18




17
 Stan Dorn, Ian Hill, and Fiona Adams, Louisiana Breaks New Ground: The Nation’s First Use of
Automatic Enrollment through Express Lane Eligibility (Washington, D.C.: The Urban Institute, 2012).
18
  The Urban Institute noted several limitations to its analysis. For example, it assumed that all ELE-
enrolled children who used their Medicaid cards would, in the absence of ELE, have enrolled using
the state’s traditional processes. That assumption would overestimate administrative cost savings
because some of these children would probably not have enrolled in the absence of ELE. In contrast,
administrative costs may have been understated because some children who were enrolled through
ELE might, in the absence of ELE, only have been enrolled on an expedited basis after developing an
urgent medical need. Administrative costs exceed average levels in such cases.



Page 6                                                    GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
 Louisiana’s Express Lane Eligibility Implementation

 Louisiana uses findings from SNAP to identify and automatically enroll children in Medicaid. The
 SNAP application that Louisiana originally used informed parents that if their children qualify for
 SNAP, they may also qualify for free health insurance. If parents did not wish their information to be
 shared with Medicaid, they could decline this option by checking a box on the SNAP application.
 (In January 2011, the form was changed to allow families to opt in to information sharing and
 automatic enrollment.) Each month, the department that administers SNAP gave the state Medicaid
 program an electronic file of children receiving SNAP whose parents did not opt out of the
 information sharing option. Medicaid staff matched this SNAP file against Medicaid files to identify
 those children who were not already enrolled and against Social Security Administration (SSA) data
 to verify citizenship status. Then, relying on the SNAP findings and the SSA data match, the SNAP
 children were automatically enrolled in Medicaid. The state sent the parents enrollment cards for the
 children. Louisiana treated a child’s first use of the Medicaid card to access care as evidence of
 consent to enrollment.

 (From Stan Dorn, Ian Hill, and Fiona Adams, Louisiana Breaks New Ground: The Nation’s First Use
 of Automatic Enrollment through Express Lane Eligibility [Washington, D.C.: The Urban Institute,
 2012], and Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Optimizing Medicaid Enrollment: Spotlight on
 Technology [Menlo Park, Calif.: The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010].)



South Carolina estimated that it would save 50,000 hours and $1 million per year by
implementing ELE. 19 South Carolina uses income findings from SNAP and TANF for
Medicaid renewals. Prior to implementing ELE, South Carolina officials determined
that a large number of children temporarily lost coverage at renewal, which can be
problematic for families and also increases the administrative costs for Medicaid
because it requires staff to make new eligibility determinations when children
reapply. Specifically, the officials found that 42 percent of children who lost coverage
at renewal were reenrolled in Medicaid within 1 month. They also estimated that staff
spent, on average, 20 minutes on each renewal determination. Since South
Carolina’s ELE implementation allowed for automated reviews with no staff
involvement, it enabled the state to save money as well as prevented children from
losing coverage.

Additionally, in our recent report on access to care through Medicaid, 6 states
reported to us that ELE helped reduce the time required for processing new
applications. 20 We surveyed the 50 states and the District of Columbia from February
through May 2012 and asked whether the average processing time for new regular
Medicaid applications—applications not based on disability—had changed since
January 2008. Of the 8 states that had implemented ELE for initial eligibility
determinations before the survey was completed, 6 reported that the average
processing time had decreased—Alabama, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, New Jersey,

19
 CMS, 2011 CHIPRA Annual Report: Steady Growth, New Innovation (Washington, D.C.: 2011); and
John Supra, South Carolina’s Experience Implementing Express Lane Redeterminations (Columbia,
S.C.: South Carolina Health & Human Services, Nov. 1, 2011).
20
  For this report, we administered a survey of Medicaid officials in the 50 states, the District of
Columbia, and the 5 largest U. S. territories generally asking about their experiences from 2008 to
2011 with regard to any changes in beneficiaries’ access to care. Not all states were able to provide
specific data in response to our survey. For example, 16 states could not report their average
processing times for their Medicaid applications, of which about half noted that they do not track
these data or that they track them differently than how they were requested in our survey. For
additional details, see GAO-13-55.



Page 7                                                     GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
and Oregon—and each of these 6 states indicated that they believed that ELE was
one of the procedures that had decreased the processing times. 21

The CHIPRA-mandated evaluation of ELE included a plan to estimate administrative
costs in 6 states that implemented ELE—Alabama, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, New
Jersey, and Oregon. 22 Preliminary results of the evaluation indicated that ELE has
the potential to result in administrative savings, the extent to which will depend on
how the state implements ELE. Preliminary results also indicated that administrative
savings were generally greater in states that implemented highly automated ELE
enrollment processes, and these states were generally ones that had built on
existing relationships with their Express Lane Agencies. Furthermore, preliminary
results suggested that some states’ savings were partially offset by the costs of
implementing ELE, including costs of identifying and conducting outreach to children
who did not subsequently enroll. 23

Information Regarding ELE’s Effects on Enrollment

As of September 2012, available information from several states regarding the
effects of ELE on enrollment suggested that ELE could have beneficial effects on
enrollment, although the magnitude of the effect varied according to how the state
implemented ELE. During 2010, Louisiana identified over 20,500 children who were
eligible for initial enrollment in Medicaid through its ELE implementation, and of
these children, about 11,100 were enrolled and used services. 24 In the first full year
during which Louisiana used ELE for renewals, over 156,000 children were renewed
through ELE. South Carolina renewed 65,000 children using ELE during the first
6 months of its ELE implementation. 25 (Both states implemented ELE using
automated reviews of electronic data.) New Jersey’s ELE implementation resulted in
enrollment of a more modest number of children. 26 The state used information
provided on its income tax forms to identify uninsured children, and enrolled slightly
over 3,800 children on the basis of the 2008 tax form and another 135 children on
the basis of the 2009 tax form. 27


21
  Of the other two states that had implemented ELE procedures for initial Medicaid determinations
before the survey was completed, Georgia reported that it did not know whether its average
processing time for new regular applications had changed since January 2008, and Louisiana
reported that its average processing time for new regular applications (which would include
applications from most adults, not just children) had increased.
22
 As of November 29, 2012, the results of this evaluation had not been issued. This evaluation used
methods for estimating administrative costs that differed from the methods that the Urban Institute
used in its evaluation of the Louisiana ELE implementation.
23
 Margaret Colby, Adam Swinburn, and Sean Orzol, More with Less: Express Lane Eligibility’s
Potential to Improve Administrative Efficiency (abstract for a conference of the Association for Public
Policy Analysis and Management, November 2012).
24
 Stan Dorn, Ian Hill, and Fiona Adams, Louisiana Breaks New Ground.
25
 CMS, 2011 CHIPRA Annual Report: Steady Growth, New Innovation.
26
 Families USA, Express Lane Eligibility: Early State Experiences and Lessons for Health Reform.
(Washington, D.C.: January 2011).
27
  Under ELE, a state may obtain and use information directly from state income tax records or
returns.



Page 8                                                     GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
In addition to increasing the number of enrolled children, ELE may help reach
children who differ in age or other characteristics from those who are enrolled
through other methods. For example, the Urban Institute’s analysis of the Louisiana
ELE implementation found that children who were enrolled through ELE included a
greater proportion of children who were over the age of 7 than did children who were
not enrolled through ELE. 28

The CHIPRA-mandated evaluation of ELE also included a plan to examine
enrollment outcomes associated with ELE implementations to date. Preliminary
analysis of data from 5 states that implemented ELE—Alabama, Iowa, Louisiana,
Maryland, and New Jersey—indicated that enrollment gains associated with ELE
varied depending on how the state implemented ELE. Preliminary results also
suggested that states that used automated processes or that minimized the number
of steps that were required to apply for coverage tended to have greater increases in
enrollment with ELE. 29

States’ Level of Interest in Using ELE, Including for PPACA Implementation

States’ level of interest in continuing or starting to use the ELE option, including for
PPACA implementation, is also a key consideration regarding the availability of ELE
after September 30, 2013. Stakeholders we interviewed—including representatives
of organizations that represent states, representatives of organizations that have
conducted research or issued reports or briefs on ELE, and CMS officials—
described reasons why states might be interested in using ELE, and why some
states may not have chosen to implement ELE to date. As of November 2012,
13 states had been approved to implement ELE. Stakeholders we spoke with
generally believed that states that currently use ELE would be interested in
continuing to use it beyond the September 30, 2013, expiration date. For example,
states that have already implemented ELE may want to continue using it to avoid
having to change their Medicaid or CHIP enrollment or renewal processes or to
continue any benefits they have accrued through its use. In addition, some
stakeholders said that states may want to use ELE as they transition children from
CHIP to Medicaid in implementing a PPACA requirement that raises the required
income threshold for Medicaid eligibility for certain children. 30 Stakeholders also
identified a number of reasons why states may not have chosen to implement ELE
to date. One reason highlighted by many stakeholders was the significant budget
pressures that states are facing, which might make them reluctant to undertake
options that would increase Medicaid or CHIP enrollment and costs, including costs
for the services additional enrollees would receive. Several stakeholders also noted

28
 Stan Dorn, Ian Hill, and Fiona Adams, Louisiana Breaks New Ground.
29
 Sean Orzol, Adam Swinburn, and Margaret Colby, Expanding Coverage Using Express Lane
Eligibility: Analysis of Administrative Data from Five States (abstract for a conference of the
Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, November, 2012).
30
  Prior to PPACA, states were required to provide Medicaid coverage for children age 6 to 19 with
income below 100 percent of the federal poverty level and had the option of extending coverage
above that income level under their Medicaid or CHIP programs. Beginning January 1, 2014, PPACA
increases the mandatory income level for these children from 100 to 133 percent of the federal
poverty level. As a result, those states that have enrolled children age 6 to 19 with income between
100 and 133 percent of the federal poverty level in separate CHIP programs must transfer this
population into their Medicaid programs no later than January 1, 2014.



Page 9                                                     GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
that states have significant responsibilities in preparing to implement PPACA
requirements and, as a result, do not have the time to explore and implement new
options like ELE. Several stakeholders also noted that states may be thinking that
there is no point in implementing ELE if the authority is going to expire in September
2013.

Although current ELE authority under CHIPRA applies only to children, states’
interest in the continued availability of ELE may depend to some degree on their
ability to use ELE to enroll adults in Medicaid. The stakeholders we interviewed
noted benefits to being able to use ELE for adults, such as substantial administrative
savings from renewing children and their parents at the same time. Some
stakeholders said that not being able to use ELE for parents has made ELE less
attractive to states. Furthermore, several stakeholders said that if ELE were made
available for adults, states that move forward with Medicaid expansion under
PPACA could use ELE to enroll newly eligible adults. 31 Currently, states with interest
in expanding ELE to include adults may request authority to do so through what is
known as a section 1115 Medicaid demonstration. The Secretary of Health and
Human Services has authority under section 1115 of the Social Security Act to grant
states waivers of certain federal Medicaid requirements and to provide federal funds
for expenditures that are not otherwise allowable for the purpose of demonstrating
alternative approaches to service delivery. Several stakeholders noted, however,
that this option is less than optimal for states because section 1115 demonstrations
are time-limited and take more administrative time and cost to obtain approval than a
state plan amendment. So far, 2 of the 13 states that have implemented ELE
(Alabama and Massachusetts) have been approved by CMS to use ELE to enroll
certain Medicaid-eligible adults as part of their section 1115 demonstrations. 32

Stakeholders also noted other reasons that states might find it beneficial to be able
to use ELE after September 2013:

•    PPACA requires that, effective January 1, 2014, states determine Medicaid or
     CHIP income eligibility for certain categories of individuals using a uniform
     method—modified adjusted gross income (MAGI)—that is derived from a federal
     tax-based definition of income. 33 Therefore, if reauthorized, ELE could be useful
     when federal income tax information cannot be used to determine eligibility, for
     example, if the household does not file federal income taxes.


31
  PPACA provides for the expansion of Medicaid eligibility to nonpregnant, nonelderly individuals with
income at or below 133 percent of the federal poverty level beginning no later than January 1, 2014.
32
 HHS has stated that states may also pursue authority to use ELE with children beyond
September 30, 2013, through a section 1115 demonstration.
33
  Unless there is an exception, states are required to use MAGI in determining eligibility for new
Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries beginning on January 1, 2014. For beneficiaries determined eligible
on or before December 31, 2013, states need not apply MAGI until March 31, 2014, or the next
regularly scheduled renewal of eligibility. ELE is one of the exceptions to the MAGI requirement;
however, because ELE is currently scheduled to expire as of September 30, 2013, this exception is
time-limited. For example, a child who was enrolled in a state Medicaid program through ELE prior to
September 30, 2013, will not need to have his or her eligibility reevaluated using MAGI until
March 31, 2014, or the next regularly scheduled redetermination—up to a year after the ELE-based
determination, whichever is later.



Page 10                                                   GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
•    PPACA also requires states to employ efficient, data-driven procedures for
     determining eligibility that maximize data sharing across agencies and minimize
     burdens on individuals and families. 34 In response, states may be modernizing
     their existing eligibility and enrollment systems to accommodate the new
     requirements. 35 Until they have modernized such systems, some states may find
     it helpful to use ELE, although other states may find it cumbersome to maintain
     ELE-based systems while upgrading their data systems.

Uncertainty Regarding the Potential for Erroneous Excess Payments

Whether states’ use of ELE has resulted in erroneous excess payments for children
enrolled through ELE is another key consideration related to the availability of ELE
beyond September 2013. However, the extent to which erroneous payments may
have been made is not known. CHIPRA provides a mechanism to evaluate the
potential for erroneous excess payments for children enrolled through ELE and to
ensure corrective actions, including corrective adjustment to the federal share of
these payments. Specifically, consistent with the definition of traditional Medicaid
erroneous excess payment calculations, CHIPRA requires states to compute error
rates associated with ELE by conducting full Medicaid eligibility reviews on a
statistically valid sample of children enrolled using findings from an Express Lane
Agency and to report the rate of erroneous excess payments to CMS annually. 36
However, given the complexities of ELE, questions have been raised regarding how
an ELE error should be defined. For example, one of the ELE stakeholders we
interviewed noted that ELE essentially changed Medicaid and CHIP eligibility rules,
and questioned whether a child enrolled through ELE who turned out not to meet
standard Medicaid eligibility criteria, but was enrolled appropriately on the basis of
the findings of another agency as allowed by ELE, should be considered an error. In
addition, technical questions have arisen, such as whether states should include
children who were initially enrolled through ELE but subsequently renewed using the
state’s traditional procedures when calculating errors.

As of November 2012, CMS had begun discussions about error rates internally and
with states, but had not yet obtained error rate information from them, according to
CMS officials. In February 2010, CMS stated that it would issue guidance to states


34
  For example, PPACA requires that states participate in a coordinated eligibility and enrollment
process for Medicaid and other health insurance programs, including CHIP, and that state eligibility
determination systems interface with a Federal Data Services Hub (referred to as the federal hub).
The federal hub is an electronic service under development by HHS that states will use to verify
certain information with other federal agencies, such as an applicant’s citizenship through the Social
Security Administration, immigration status through the Department of Homeland Security, and
income data through the Internal Revenue Service.
35
 States may receive federal funds equal to 90 percent of costs incurred between April 19, 2011 and
December 31, 2015 for the design, development, installation, or enhancement of Medicaid eligibility
determination systems. Medicaid Program: Federal Funding for Medicaid Eligibility Determination and
Enrollment Activities, 75 Fed. Reg. 21950, 21974 (Apr. 19, 2011).
36
   If the error rate exceeds 3 percent for either of the first 2 fiscal years in which the state implements
ELE, the state must identify the corrective actions taken. If the error rate exceeds 3 percent for any
fiscal year in which the state implements ELE, the state must reduce its claim for federal funds in the
amount of the erroneous payments made for children included in the sample in excess of the
3 percent error rate. 42 U.S.C. § 1396a(e)(13)(E).



Page 11                                                         GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
about how to calculate error rates. 37 But as of November 2012, the agency had not
yet done so. CMS officials said they have instead directed their attention to issues
associated with implementation of PPACA, which was enacted approximately 1 year
after the ELE option was made available. CMS officials said that they were
considering, and have had discussions with states about, various options for how
error rates should be calculated, recognizing the complexities of doing so. CMS
officials said they do not anticipate issuing proposed rules or guidance about ELE
error rates in the immediate future. 38

Concluding Observations

The option of implementing ELE is still a relatively new one for states. Although
available information on the administrative savings and enrollment effects
associated with ELE is limited, early information suggests ELE could create
administrative savings for states and could have beneficial effects on enrollment.
And while ELE’s authority is scheduled to expire, stakeholders suggested that states
already using ELE would be interested in continuing its use, including to assist with
PPACA implementation. Because of the limited number of states currently using
ELE and the uncertainty about the potential costs associated with any erroneous
excess payments resulting from states’ use of ELE, the savings from and outcomes
of ELE implementations cannot be fully understood. We recognize that CMS has
directed its attention to issues associated with PPACA implementation, and that
determining how error rates associated with ELE should be calculated could take
some time. Because CHIPRA’s authorization for ELE is scheduled to expire in less
than 1 year, we are not making a recommendation at this time. However, if ELE is
extended beyond its scheduled September 30, 2013, expiration date, it will be
particularly important that CMS place higher priority on clarifying how states should
determine ELE error rates and collect information on these erroneous excess
payments.

Agency Comments

We provided a draft of this report to HHS for review. HHS did not comment on our
findings but provided technical comments, which we incorporated as appropriate.

                                              –––––

As agreed with your office, unless you publicly announce the contents of this report
earlier, we plan no further distribution until 30 days from the report date. At that time,
we will send copies of this report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services,
the Acting Administrator of CMS, appropriate congressional committees, and other
interested parties. The report also will be available at no charge on the GAO website
at http://www.gao.gov.


37
  In a letter to state health officials in February 2010, CMS stated that it would specify a process for
the error rate measurement in regulation and also noted that additional guidance would be
forthcoming regarding the selection of samples, the calculation of the improper payment rate, and the
format and means of reporting the results of the payment reviews. CMS, Letter to State Health
Officials, SHO #10-003 (Feb. 4, 2010).
38
 We did not interview state officials to determine whether they were calculating error rates.



Page 12                                                    GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
If you or your staff have any questions about this report, please contact me at
(202) 512-7114 or iritanik@gao.gov. Contact points for our Offices of Congressional
Relations and Public Affairs may be found on the last page of this report. GAO staff
who made major contributions to this report are listed in enclosure I.

Sincerely yours,




Katherine Iritani
Director, Health Care

Enclosure




Page 13                                           GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
Enclosure I

                    GAO Contact and Staff Acknowledgments

Contact

Katherine Iritani, (202) 512-7114 or iritanik@gao.gov

Staff Acknowledgments

In addition to the contact named above, key contributors to this report were
Catina Bradley, Assistant Director; Kristen Joan Anderson; Linda McIver;
Roseanne Price; Christina Ritchie; and Hemi Tewarson.




(291053)



Page 14                                           GAO-13-178R Express Lane Eligibility
This is a work of the U.S. government and is not subject to copyright protection in the
United States. The published product may be reproduced and distributed in its entirety
without further permission from GAO. However, because this work may contain
copyrighted images or other material, permission from the copyright holder may be
necessary if you wish to reproduce this material separately.
                      The Government Accountability Office, the audit, evaluation, and
GAO’s Mission         investigative arm of Congress, exists to support Congress in meeting its
                      constitutional responsibilities and to help improve the performance and
                      accountability of the federal government for the American people. GAO
                      examines the use of public funds; evaluates federal programs and
                      policies; and provides analyses, recommendations, and other assistance
                      to help Congress make informed oversight, policy, and funding decisions.
                      GAO’s commitment to good government is reflected in its core values of
                      accountability, integrity, and reliability.

                      The fastest and easiest way to obtain copies of GAO documents at no
Obtaining Copies of   cost is through GAO’s website (www.gao.gov). Each weekday afternoon,
GAO Reports and       GAO posts on its website newly released reports, testimony, and
                      correspondence. To have GAO e-mail you a list of newly posted products,
Testimony             go to www.gao.gov and select “E-mail Updates.”

Order by Phone        The price of each GAO publication reflects GAO’s actual cost of
                      production and distribution and depends on the number of pages in the
                      publication and whether the publication is printed in color or black and
                      white. Pricing and ordering information is posted on GAO’s website,
                      http://www.gao.gov/ordering.htm.
                      Place orders by calling (202) 512-6000, toll free (866) 801-7077, or
                      TDD (202) 512-2537.
                      Orders may be paid for using American Express, Discover Card,
                      MasterCard, Visa, check, or money order. Call for additional information.
                      Connect with GAO on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube.
Connect with GAO      Subscribe to our RSS Feeds or E-mail Updates. Listen to our Podcasts.
                      Visit GAO on the web at www.gao.gov.
                      Contact:
To Report Fraud,
Waste, and Abuse in   Website: www.gao.gov/fraudnet/fraudnet.htm
                      E-mail: fraudnet@gao.gov
Federal Programs      Automated answering system: (800) 424-5454 or (202) 512-7470

                      Katherine Siggerud, Managing Director, siggerudk@gao.gov, (202) 512-
Congressional         4400, U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street NW, Room
Relations             7125, Washington, DC 20548

                      Chuck Young, Managing Director, youngc1@gao.gov, (202) 512-4800
Public Affairs        U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street NW, Room 7149
                      Washington, DC 20548




                        Please Print on Recycled Paper.