oversight

Tactical Fighter Aircraft: Differences Between the Air Force's Roadmap and the Five Year Defense Plan

Published by the Government Accountability Office on 1990-08-30.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

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                                    l.._l_._._..,.          I_-
Allglrst         I!t!N
                                                         TACTICAL FIGHTER
                                                         AIRCRAFT
                                                          Differences Between
                                                          the Air Force’s
                                                          Roadmap and the Five
                                                          Year Defense Plan

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                                                                                        RELEASED
                                                           RESTRICTED ---Not     to be released outside the
                                                           General Accounting OBlce unless specifhlly
                                                           approved by the Office of Congressional
                                                           Relations.
                   United States
GAO                General Accounting Office
                   Washington, D.C. 20648

                   National Security and
                   International Affairs Division

                   B-226450

                   August 30,199O

                   The Honorable Les Aspin
                   Chairman, Committee on
                     Armed Services
                   House of Representatives

                   Dear Mr. Chairman:

                   This report is in response to your request for information about the Tac-
                   tical Fighter Roadmap in light of possible cuts in tactical forces. You
                   asked us whether the Tactical Fighter Roadmap clearly shows the force
                   structure included in the President’s budget request and supporting Five
                   Year Defense Plan. On March 23,1990, we briefed your staff on the
                   results of our work. This report summarizes and updates that
                   information.

                   Our objectives were to (1) provide information on the roadmap’s pur-
                   pose, development, basis, and relationship to the defense budget process
                   and (2) identify differences between the force structure (i.e., the number
                   and type of aircraft) in the October 1989 roadmap and the force struc-
                   ture in the amended fiscal year 1990/1991 budget and supporting April
                   1989 Five Year Defense Plan. The defense plan is a cost projection of the
                   Department of Defense’s (DOD) approved programs for the budget year
                   and four additional years.


                   The Tactical Fighter Roadmap presents a strategy for acquiring and
Results in Brief   maintaining the force structure desired by the tactical commanders. The
                   roadmap, however, is not an official strategy approved by DOD or Air
                   Force Headquarters. The Tactical Air Command (TAC), which represents
                   the commanders of U.S. Tactical Air Forces (TAF), develops and revises a
                   briefing on the roadmap based on threat considerations, force structure
                   positions, and fiscal constraints. During the budget process, the
                   roadmap is used by TAc and Air Force Headquarters in developing
                   budget requests. Portions of the briefing have also been presented to the
                   Congress during appropriations hearings.

                   The October 1989 roadmap includes TAF'S modernization plans for the 36
                   wings’ of tactical fighters assigned to its active, Air National Guard, and

                   ‘A tactical fighter wing usually consists of 3 squadrons of 24 combat aircraft each. TAC estimates it
                   needs about 100 aircraft for every fighter wing: 72 for combat, 18 for training, 8 for backup inven-
                   tory, and 2 for testing. The roadmap shows only combat aircraft.



                   Page   1                                              GAO/NSIADBO-262       Tactical   F’ighter Aircraf%
                      B226460                                                                             d’




                      reserve forces. It reflects the fiscal year 1990/1991 budget request but
                      presents a tactical force structure in the years beyond 1991 that is dif-
                      ferent from the force structure presented in the April 1989 defense plan.
                      The defense plan and the roadmap do not agree on the number and type
                      of aircraft scheduled to be purchased or retired after fiscal year 1991,
                      For example, they differ on the proportion of close air support aircraft
                      to total aircraft in the force and the type of aircraft to be used in that
                      mission. One reason for the difference is that the roadmap shows the
                      A-16 aircraft entering the force, but the defense plan does not. This and
                      other differences are not readily apparent because the defense plan is
                      not shown in summary form, as is the roadmap.


                      TAF consists of TAC, which is responsible for updating the roadmap, the
Background            U.S. Air Forces in Europe, and the Pacific Air Forces. Although TAF
                      operates many types of aircraft, the roadmap consists of only tactical
                      fighter aircraft that perform air-to-air and air-to-ground combat mis-
                      sions. These include A-7, A-10, F-4, F-4G, F-15, F-lSE, F-16, F-l 11, and
                      F-l 17A aircraft. The roadmap’s future force also includes the new air-
                      to-air aircraft, the Advanced Tactical Fighter, and new air-to-ground
                      aircraft, the Advanced Tactical Aircraft and the A-16. Other aircraft
                      assigned to TAF are not part of the 36-wing force because, according to
                      TX officials, they perform support, not fighter, missions such as recon-
                      naissance and forward air control.

                      The defense plan summarizes the programs approved by DOD for forces
                      and associated resources. The defense plan projects budgets for 6 years
                      and the number of aircraft for 8 years. The April 1989 defense plan
                      contained approximately $1.5 billion for operating and maintaining 36
                      wings of tactical aircraft in fiscal year 1990. In addition, the fiscal year
                      1990/1991 budget requested $4.2 billion to purchase 186 more tactical
                      aircraft.


                      The Tactical Fighter Roadmap presents TAF'S strategy for acquiring and
Roadmap Purpose,      maintaining the number and type of tactical aircraft it desires to mod-
Development, Basis,   ernize and sustain for its 36-wing force. TAC develops and revises the
and Use               roadmap based on threat considerations, TAF force structure positions,
                      and fiscal constraints. During the budget process, the roadmap is used in
                      preparing budget requests, and portions have been briefed to the Con-
          *           gress during appropriations hearings.




                      Page 2                                   GAO/NSLAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
Roadmap Is a Plan to        The October 1989 roadmap identifies TAF'S desired number and type of
Modernize Tactical Forces   aircraft and plans for improvements. The roadmap includes plans for
                            introducing new and retiring old aircraft over the next 10 years and the
                            number and type of aircraft to be purchased. To sustain a modern
                            36-wing force, the October 1989 roadmap advocated buying 209 aircraft
                            each year. The roadmap does not include cost estimates for operating
                            and maintaining these aircraft.

                            The roadmap groups the aircraft according to their use and identifies
                            the force mix (the proportion of each group to the total force). Specifi-
                            cally, the F-15 and Advanced Tactical Fighter are for air-to-air missions,
                            whereas the A-7, A-10, A-16, F-4G, F-l 11, and F-l 17A are for air-to-
                            ground missions. The F-4, F-lSE, and F-16 are designated as multirole
                            because they can perform either air-to-air or air-to-ground missions.
                            According to the roadmap, the force mix is to be no more than 25 per-
                            cent air-to-air, no more than 36 percent air-to-ground, and at least 40
                            percent multirole.

                            The roadmap recognizes the need to improve aircraft capabilities, but it
                            does not include detailed plans for these improvements. For example, to
                            keep the force modern, the roadmap lists avionics, engines, airframes,
                            and munitions as areas requiring improvements. However, it does not
                            include a schedule showing when each aircraft type should receive
                            improvements, what the specific improvements should be, or an esti-
                            mate of what the improvements will cost.


Roadmap Development         According to a TAC official, there is no official guidance on roadmap
                            development. The official said that TAC informally consults with the TAF
and Revision                commanders and Air Force Headquarters officials on the roadmap’s con-
                            tent and updates the roadmap when there are significant changes in a
                            budget or when TAF officials agree on aircraft force structure changes. A
                            briefing on the revised roadmap is presented to TAF commanders at their
                            semiannual conference and, if approved, becomes an official TAF posi-
                            tion. Since it is a TAF position, approval is not requested from Air Force
                            Headquarters or DOD, according to TAC officials.




                            Page 3                                 GAO/NSIAlMO-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
                          B-226450                                                                      4.




Roadmap Based on Threat   The roadmap’s modernization strategy focuses on meeting the threat
Considerations, TAF’s     within some fiscal constraints. TAF considers the current and future
                          threat in determining the need for and development of tactical aircraft,
Desires, and Fiscal       the roadmap’s annual procurement goal, and the relative number of dr-
Constraints               craft for each mission. However, fiscal constraints limit the total number
                          of aircraft in the force.

                          The aircraft contained in the roadmap have been justified through TAF'S
                          requirements process, which bases the need for and development of
                          each aircraft on the operational threat specified in various documents.
                          The Systems Operational Requirements Document, for example, con-
                          tains an assessment of foreign military capabilities and defines the air-
                          craft requirements necessary to operate effectively against such
                          capabilities.

                          Threat is also considered in developing the roadmap’s procurement goal,
                          The October 1989 roadmap states that TM'S goal is to purchase 209 air-
                          craft each year to sustain a modern 36-wing force. This goal is based on
                          TAF'S desire to maintain the average age of tactical aircraft at no more
                          than 11 years. According to TAC officials, if the TAF fighter force main-
                          tains an average age of 11 years or less, the force’s capabilities will keep
                          pace with the threat.

                          TAF also considers threat information in maintaining the roadmap’s force
                          mix. According to TX officials, the roadmap’s force mix was justified by
                          a TAC study that considered the historical wartime use of tactical air-
                          craft, the existing force mix, and Air Force Headquarters’ Planning
                          Force. The Planning Force is the Air Force’s determination, without con-
                          sidering fiscal constraints, of the number of each type of aircraft
                          required to be reasonably assured of success against the projected
                          threat. The TAC study resulted in TAF guidelines for the percent of the
                          force to be assigned to air-to-air, air-to-ground, and multirole groups.
                          According to a TAC official, TAC uses these proportions when planning the
                          roadmap’s desired schedules for introducing and retiring aircraft.

                          TAF'S decisions on individual  aircraft have also initiated changes in the
                          roadmap, These changes may include new aircraft for meeting the
                          threat or different numbers of a certain type aircraft to be maintained in
                          the force. If TAF decides it needs a new type of aircraft, TAC officials
                          stated that the roadmap would be changed to show the procurement and
                          introduction of that aircraft into the force. For example, the roadmap
                          advocates procuring the A-16, even though DOD has not approved or
                          funded the A- 16’s procurement.


                          Page 4                                  GAO/NSIAD-ftO-262Tactical Fighter Aircraft
  II                  B.226460




                      Fiscal constraints also affect the size of the force and the pace of force
                      modernization in the roadmap. For example, although the 1984 roadmap
                      presented a goal for the aircraft fighter force to grow to 40 wings to
                      meet the threat, the goal was subsequently reduced to 36 wings in
                      response to budgetary pressures. The next roadmap will shows an even
                      smaller force that, according to a TAC official, will reflect Air Force
                      Headquarters’ budget submission to DOD for fiscal years 1992 to 1997.

                      The roadmap has been revised to reflect the most recent President’s
                      budget. For example, although the October 1989 roadmap specifies a
                      goal of buying 209 aircraft each year, the roadmap shows that only 186
                      aircraft will be procured in fiscal years 1990 and 1991, the same amount
                      contained in the President’s budget request for those years.


Roadmap Used During   Both TAC and Air Force Headquarters use the roadmap during the
Budget Process        budget process. According to a TAC planning official, TAC requests
                      funding for roadmap items. For example, TM'S budget request to Air
                      Force Headquarters for fiscal years 1992 to 1997 supported the October
                      1989 roadmap’s plan to buy the A-16 aircraft. According to an official at
                      Air Force Headquarters, the roadmap is used in considering TX'S budget
                      request.

                      Although it is not an official Air Force position, the roadmap is used by
                      officials at Air Force Headquarters to brief congressional committees
                      during the budget process. Air Force officials consider the roadmap val-
                      uable because it presents an overall picture of TAF'S future force needs.
                      Therefore, the Air Force uses the roadmap to advocate aircraft procure-
                      ment in its budget submission to the Congress. For example, officials
                      with the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff
                      of the Air Force have briefed the House Committee on Appropriations
                      each year from 1984 to 1988 on portions of the roadmap. Specifically,
                      the fiscal year 1988 Air Force Acquisition Statement affirmed that
                      determining “the appropriate quantity and mix of fighter aircraft has
                      been guided by the Tactical Fighter Roadmap.” Moreover, the Air
                      Force’s statement to the Congress for the fiscal year 1989 appropria-
                      tions hearings said that the Air Force uses the Tactical Fighter Roadmap
                      as a guide to achieve and maintain the tactical fighter force.




                      Page 5                                 GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
                      B226460                                                                           E




                      The October 1989 roadmap’s projected force and procurement plans for
Differences Ektween   fiscal years 1990 and 1991 closely coincided with those in the April
the Roadmap and the   1989 defense plan, However, some differences occur after fiscal year
Defense Plan          1991 in the planned number and type of aircraft to be purchased, main-
                      tained, and retired. The impact of these differences in projected future
                      tactical forces is not readily apparent, since the defense plan is not
                      presented in summary form, as is the roadmap.

                      Our comparison of tactical forces projected in the defense plan and the
                      roadmap identified differences in force mix, total procurement, type of
                      aircraft maintained in the force, and aircraft retirement schedules. For
                      example, after fiscal year 1991, the roadmap’s close air support strategy
                      is to upgrade or retire the A-7s, retire the A-10s buy A-16s, and modify
                      some F-16s while maintaining about 27 percent, or 9.6 wings, of the tac-
                      tical force as close air support aircraft.

                      The defense plan’s provisions for close air support forces is not readily
                      apparent. The defense plan differs from the roadmap in that it (1)
                      shows the retirement of the A-7 aircraft 3 years earlier, (2) indicates
                      more of the A-10 aircraft are maintained in the tactical forces for a
                      longer period, and (3) excludes procurement of the A-16 aircraft. Thus,
                      the defense plan appears to show a gradual decrease of close air support
                      aircraft to a level well below 27 percent as A-7s retire and are not
                      replaced by A-16s. However, according to DOD, Air Force Headquarters,
                      and TAC officials, the Air Force’s strategy will be to use multirole F-16s
                      in the close air support mission to maintain the percent of the tactical
                      force currently designated to perform close air support.


                      The roadmap and the defense plan present two different long-term pro-
Conclusions and       jections of future tactical forces. However, these differences are not
Observations          readily apparent because the defense plan is not shown in summary
                      form and does not show how aircraft will be used. A comparable DOD
                      roadmap that captures the long-term tactical force structure that DOD
                      proposes to buy and maintain might be beneficial. A DOD roadmap could
                      summarize the tactical fighter programs approved by DOD and supported
                      by its defense plan and be presented in a format similar to the Tactical
                      Fighter Roadmap. The DOD roadmap presentation could be submitted to
                      the Congress with the President’s budget for use in assessing the long-
                      term effect of procurement plans and budget requests for tactical forces,
                      particularly in light of a tighter budget and anticipated changes in the
                      Air Force’s force structure.



                      Page 6                                 GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
E220460




The types of tactical missions and the aircraft that perform them are
described in appendix I. Our objectives, scope, and methodology are dis-
cussed in appendix II.

As arranged with your office, unless you publicly announce its contents
earlier, we plan no further distribution of this report until 30 days after
its issue date. At that time we will send copies to interested congres-
sional committees; the Secretaries of Defense and the Air Force; and the
Director, Office of Management and Budget.

Please contact me at (202) 275-4268 if you or your staff have any ques-
tions concerning this report. Major contributors to this report are listed
in appendix III.

Sincerely yours,




Director
Air Force Issues




Page 7                                  GAO/NSIAD-90-262Tactical Fighter Aircraft
Contents                                                                                              I’



Letter
Appendix I                                                                                                10
Descriptions of         A-7D                                                                              11
                                                                                                          12
Tactical Missions and   tiim                                                                              13
Aircraft                F-4G                                                                              14
                        F-16C                                                                             16
                        F-16E                                                                             16
                        F-16C                                                                             17
                        F-1llF                                                                            18
                        F-117A                                                                            19

Appendix II                                                                                               20
Objectives, Scope,and
Methodology
Appendix III                                                                                              22
Major Contributors to
This Report
Figures                 Figure   I. 1: A-7D                                                               11
                        Figure   1.2: A-10                                                                12
                        Figure   1.3: F-4E                                                                13
                        Figure   1.4: F-4G                                                                14
                        Figure   1.5: F-15C                                                               16
                        Figure   1.6: F-15E                                                               16
                        Figure   1.7: F-16C                                                               17
                        Figure   1.8: F-l 11F                                                             18
                        Figure   1.9: F-l 17A                                                             19




                        Abbreviations

          Y
                        DOD        Department of Defense
                        TXC        Tactical Air Command
                        TiiF       Tactical Air Forces


                        Page 8                             GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
Page 9   GAO/NSIAD-99-282Tactical Fighter Aim&t
Appendix I

Descriptionsof Tactical Missionsand Aircraft’


                The Tactical Fighter Roadmap includes plans for aircraft assigned to
                perform tactical air-to-air and air-to-ground missions. Air-to-air missions
                are to achieve air superiority. Air-to-ground missions include close air
                support, air interdiction, and suppression of enemy air defenses. Close
                air support and air interdiction missions are to provide assistance to
                ground forces. Suppression of enemy air defenses mission is to neu-
                tralize, degrade, or destroy surface enemy air defense systems in a spec-
                ified area. The aircraft that perform one or more of these tactical
                missions are described on the following pages. Descriptions include per-
                formance characteristics and, according to the October 1989 roadmap,
                the number of each type of combat aircraft and their average ages as of
                fiscal year 1989.




                Page 10                                 GAO/NSIAIMO-262 Tactical Fighter Aircraft
                                  Appendix I
                                  Dtwriptions    of Tactical   Missions
                                  and Aircraft




                                   The A-10, shown in figure 1.2, is a single-seat, twin-engine, close air sup-
A-10                               port aircraft that has an internally mounted 30-millimeter, 7-barrel
                                   cannon and can carry up to 16,000 pounds of ordnance, including
                                   various missiles and bombs. It is a subsonic aircraft that has a range of
                                   288 miles and can also remain airborne for 1.7 hours. The roadmap
                                   showed 432 A-10s in the inventory with an average age of approxi-
                                   mately 8.8 years.




                                                                                                                       c
                                                                                         -._..,,__._..-                    -   ,,.,.T.- .,,. -..,,   ”
-_-    -.-..   -.-.   -, -...,..--...-..,-                                        .,,,



                                     Source: Air Force




                                     Page 12                                 GAO/NSIALMO-262              Tactical   Fighter            Aircraft
                      Appendix I                                                                       .
                      Derrlptlons   of Tactical   Ml&one
                      and Alrcr&




F-11lF               The F-l 1 lF, shown in figure 1.8, is a two-seat, twin-engine, day or night,
                     long-range air interdiction aircraft that can carry up to 25,000 pounds
                     of various missiles and bombs. It is a supersonic aircraft that can
                     achieve a maximum speed of 2.5 times the speed of sound and has a
                     range of 2,925 miles. The roadmap showed 192 F-l 11s in the inventory
                     with an average age of about 17.9 years.

Figure 1.8: F-111F




                                                                                  .,,,
                     Source: Air Force




                     Page 18                                 GAO/NSIAD-SO-262   Tactical   Mghter   Aircraft
                          Appendix I
                          Desctiptione   of Tactical   Missions
                          and Aircraft




F-l 17A                   The F-l 17A, shown in figure 1.9, is a single-seat, twin-engine, air-to-
                          ground aircraft. Its armament and performance data are highly classi-
                          fied. The roadmap showed 36 F-l 17As in the inventory with an average
                          age of about 3.1 years.

Flguro 1.9: F-l 17A




                          Source: Air Force




                      Y




                          Page 19                                 GAO/NSlAIMO-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
Appendix II

Objectives,Scope,and Methodology


              Our objectives were to (1) provide information on the Tactical Fighter
              Roadmap’s purpose, development, basis, and relationship to the defense
              budget process and (2) identify differences between the force structure
              in the roadmap and the force structure in the amended fiscal year 1991
              budget and supporting Five Year Defense Plan. At the time of our
              review, the defense plan supporting the amended fiscal year 1991
              budget had not been published due to uncertainties in the international
              situation. Therefore, we identified differences between the April 1989
              defense plan, which supported the President’s amended fiscal year
              1990/1991 budget, and the October 1989 roadmap.

              To obtain information on the roadmap, we interviewed the officials
              responsible for its revisions at TAC Headquarters, Langley Air Force
              Base, Virginia; reviewed the summary briefing on the roadmap and the
              supporting force mix, average aircraft age, and affordability briefings;
              and analyzed TM'S aircraft modernization strategies, including aircraft
              inventory and procurement for each aircraft. We also reviewed TAC regu-
              lations to identify how aircraft development and procurement is justi-
              fied and how roadmap development relates to budget development.

              We reviewed Air Force regulations on the planning process and DOD reg-
              ulations on its planning, programming, and budgeting system at Air
              Force Headquarters, Washington, D.C. We interviewed Air Force Head-
              quarters officials to identify how the Air Force implements the DOD
              planning, programming, and budgeting system, how the Air Force
              develops the Planning Force, and how the roadmap is used during
              budget development.

              To identify differences between the force structure in the roadmap and
              in the defense plan, we compared the numbers of each type of aircraft
              for fiscal years 1990 through 1997. The Assistant Secretary of Defense
              (Comptroller) provided us with the published copy of the defense plan
              and a computer tape containing the individual data that are aggregated
              to produce the printed copy.

              We did not perform a reliability assessment of the defense plan data.
              However, these data are reviewed internally by DOD before they are
              released by the Comptroller. Further, we used the printed defense plan
              as an internal control to check the accuracy of information retrieved
              from the computerized data. The budget year data were consistent with
              other budget documents.




              Page 20                               GAO/NSJAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraf’t
APl=&     IJ
ObJecthe,    Scope, and Methodology




We conducted our review from August 1989 to June 1990 in accordance
with generally accepted government auditing standards. As requested,
we did not obtain official agency comments on this report. However, we
discussed the information in this report with DOD and Air Force officials
and included their comments where appropriate.




Page 21                                GAO/NSWBO-262   Tactical   F’ighter Aircraft
Appendix III

Major Contributors to This Report


                        Norman J. Rabkin, Associate Director
National Security and   Robert L. Pelletier, Assistant Director
International Affairs   William R. Grave&e, Assignment Manager
                        Harvey J. Finberg, Computer Systems Analyst
Division, Washington,   Jai E. Lee, Computer Programmer/Analyst
DC.

Norfolk Regional        Brenda M. Waterfield, Evaluator-in-Charge
Office                  Craig A. Hall, Staff Evaluator
                        Allison C. Pike, Staff Evaluator




               Y




(aazale)                Page 22                                GAO/NSIAD@O-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
Orders may also tm plact~d by calling   (202) 2756241.
                                                              .   _,   -.   -._.-   -..   -
                                        .   .   .,,,,,   ,,
,.   --,   -   -.,.,-   --   ,.   _.I
                  APpendlr I
                  Deacriptiona   of Tactical   Mienions
                  andAim-&




A-7D              The A-7D, shown in figure 1.1, is a single-engine, single-seat, close air
                  support and air interdiction aircraft that can carry a 20-millimeter gun
                  and up to 16,000 pounds of missiles and bombs. It is a subsonic aircraft
                  that, with external fuel tanks, can achieve a range of 2,871 miles. The
                  A-7K is a two-seat version of the aircraft. The roadmap showed 270
                  A-7s in the inventory with an average age of approximately 16.6 years.

Figure 1.1:A-7D




                  Source: Air Force




                  Page 11                                 GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
                   Appendix I
                   Deecrlptiona   of Tactical   MLWSOIM
                   and Aircraft




F-4E               The F-4E, shown in figure 1.3, is a two-seat, twin-engine, all-weather,
                   air-to-air and air-to-ground aircraft that can carry a 20-millimeter gun
                   and various missiles. It is a supersonic aircraft that has a range of about
                   700 miles and can achieve a maximum speed of twice the speed of
                   sound. The roadmap showed 324 F-4Es in the inventory with an average
                   age of about 18.9 years.

Figure 1.3: F-4E




                   Source: Air Force




                   Page 13                                 GAO/NSIAD-m-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
           Appendix       I                                                                 ,
           Dencriptione
                      of TacticallWssions
           and Aircraft




F-4G       The F-4G, shown in figure 1.4, is a modified F-4E. The gun on the F-4E
           has been replaced by electronic warfare equipment, which enables the
           F-4G to suppress enemy air defenses. The F-4G’s primary armament is
           various missiles. The roadmap showed 72 F-4Gs in the inventory with
           an average age of about 19.1 years.




            Source: Air Force




       Y




            Page 14                               GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
                    Appendix I
                    Dewrlptiona    of Tactical   Midone
                    and Aircraft




F-15C               The F-EC, shown in figure 1.6, is a single-seat, twin-engine, air-to-air
                    aircraft that can carry a 20-millimeter gun and various missiles. It is a
                    supersonic aircraft that can achieve a maximum speed of 2.6 times the
                    speed of sound and has a range of 2,878 miles. Other versions of the air-
                    to-air fighter aircraft include the single-seat F-16A and the two-seat
                    F-16B and D. The roadmap showed 604 F-16s in the inventory with an
                    average age of about 8.4 years.

Figure 1.5: F-15C




                    Source: Air Force




                    Page 15                                GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft
Appendix I
Descriptions   of Tactical   M~S&NIB
and AimraPt




The F-16E, shown in figure 1.6, is a two-seat, twin-engine, :~~5RZI~iKl
air-to-air and air-to-ground aircraft that can carry up to 24,600 *a
of ordnance, including various missiles and bombs. It is a ti~~~~~tir~~0
craft that can achieve a maximum speed of 2.5 times the speed of 3
and, with external fuel tanks, has a range of 3,670 miles. The WIOCI
showed 24 F-16Es in the inventory with an average age of 210~
mately 0.6 years.




 -IIM~~ Air Force
            L

        .



                   Appendix I
                   Dtmriptiom     of Tactical      Mbsione
                   and Aircraft




F-16C              The F-16C, shown in figure 1.7, is a single-seat, single-engine, day or
                   night, air-to-air and air-to-ground aircraft that can carry a 20-millimeter
                   gun and various missiles and bombs. It is a supersonic aircraft that can
                   achieve a maximum speed of 2 times the speed of sound and has a range
                   of about 2,000 miles. Other versions of the aircraft include the single-
                   seat F-16A and two-seat F-16B and D. The roadmap showed 798 F-16s in
                   the inventory with an average age of about 4.3 years.

Flguro 1.7: F-NC




                                       --   ,.._,,.,,. . ,,   _._- ,,

                   Source: Air Force




                   Page 17                                              GAO/NSIAD-90-262   Tactical   Fighter   Aircraft