oversight

Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, Alpine, UT, Did Not Always Comply With Its Contract With HUD and Its Own Requirements for the Marketing and Sale of HUD-Owned Properties in the State of IL

Published by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Inspector General on 2017-08-11.

Below is a raw (and likely hideous) rendition of the original report. (PDF)

         Alpine First Preston JV II, LLC
                   Alpine, UT
          HUD’s Real Estate-Owned Management and
                   Marketing III Program




Office of Audit, Region 5      Audit Report Number: 2017-CH-1004
Chicago, IL                                        August 11, 2017
To:            Gisele G. Roget, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family Housing, HU

               //signed//
From:          Kelly Anderson, Regional Inspector General for Audit, Chicago Region, 5AGA
Subject:       Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, Alpine, UT, Did Not Always Comply
               With Its Contract With HUD and Its Own Requirements for the Marketing and
               Sale of HUD-Owned Properties in the State of IL




Attached is the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Office of Inspector
General’s (OIG) results of our review of Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, asset
manager, HUD’s real estate-owned Management and Marketing III program.
HUD Handbook 2000.06, REV-4, sets specific timeframes for management decisions on
recommended corrective actions. For each recommendation without a management decision,
please respond and provide status reports in accordance with the HUD Handbook. Please furnish
us copies of any correspondence or directives issued because of the audit.
The Inspector General Act, Title 5 United States Code, section 8M, requires that OIG post its
publicly available reports on the OIG website. Accordingly, this report will be posted at
http://www.hudoig.gov.
If you have any questions or comments about this report, please do not hesitate to call me at
312-353-7832.
                    Audit Report Number: 2017-CH-1004
                    Date: August 11, 2017

                    Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, Alpine, UT, Did Not Always
                    Comply With Its Contract With HUD and Its Own Requirements for the
                    Marketing and Sale of HUD-Owned Properties

Highlights

What We Audited and Why
We audited Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, a contracted asset manager in HUD’s
real estate-owned Management and Marketing III program, as part of the activities included in
our 2017 annual audit plan and because it was the sole contractor to market and sell U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) owned properties located in Illinois.
Our audit objective was to determine whether Alpine complied with its contract with HUD’s and
its own requirements for the marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties in the State of Illinois. 

What We Found
Alpine did not always comply with its contract with HUD and its own requirements for the
marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties. Specifically, it did not ensure that properties were
in ready-to-show condition. As a result, HUD lacked assurance that it received the highest net
return on the sale of the properties and that its holding costs for maintaining properties in
inventory were minimized.

What We Recommend
We recommend that HUD require Alpine to implement adequate procedures and controls to
ensure that it adequately monitors the conditions of the properties to ensure that they are
maintained in ready to show condition in accordance with HUD’s and its own requirements; and
update its quality control plan to include physical inspections of properties in its inventory.
Table of Contents
Background and Objective......................................................................................3

Results of Audit ........................................................................................................5
         Finding: Alpine Did Not Always Comply With Its Contract With HUD and Its Own
         Requirements for the Marketing and Sale of HUD-Owned Properties ....................... 5

Scope and Methodology .........................................................................................14

Internal Controls ....................................................................................................16

Appendixes ..............................................................................................................17
         A. Auditee Comments and OIG’s Evaluation ............................................................. 17

         B. Criteria ....................................................................................................................... 22




                                                                     2
Background and Objective
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) is an organizational unit within the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that administers the single-family mortgage
insurance program. FHA insures approved lenders against the risk of loss on mortgages. In the
event of a default on an FHA-insured loan, the lender acquires title to the property by
foreclosure, a deed in lieu of foreclosure,1 or other acquisition method; files a claim for insurance
benefits; and conveys the property to HUD. As a result of acquisitions through the mortgage
insurance program and other programs, HUD needs to manage and sell a sizable inventory of
single-family homes in a manner that promotes home ownership, preserves communities, and
maximizes the returns to the FHA insurance fund.

Since 1999, HUD has been outsourcing the disposition of its real estate-owned inventory to
private –sector contractors under its Management and Marketing (M&M) program, known as
M&M III. In 2010, HUD launched the third generation of management and marketing contracts
for field service managers2 and asset managers.3 A contract was also awarded to a mortgagee
compliance manager. HUD administers the program through four Homeownership centers
located in Atlanta, GA; Denver, CO; Philadelphia, PA, and Santa Ana, CA. Each center is
responsible for the direct oversight of the contracts for the field service managers and asset
managers within designated geographic areas.

For properties located in Illinois, HUD entered into a sole management and marketing contract
with Alpine First Preston Joint Venture II, LLC, for asset manager services to successfully
market and sell HUD-owned single-family properties and to monitor the conditions of the
properties ensure that they are maintained in ready-to-show condition until sold.

Alpine is a firm that specializes in asset management and loan servicing, with expertise in
regulatory compliance, real estate-owned management and disposition, portfolio risk
management, and real estate services. It is the sole contractor serving as the asset manager for
HUD’s management and marketing program for the State of Illinois. Alpine’s contract with
HUD requires it to monitor the conditions of the properties through inspections and notify HUD
of identified deficiencies. Alpine entered a joint venture agreement on August 1, 2014, and its
corporate office is located in Alpine, UT. HUD’s Homeownership Center in Atlanta is
responsible for the direct oversight of Alpine’s contract.


1
  A deed in lieu of foreclosure is a transaction in which a homeowner voluntarily transfers the title to the property to
the lender in exchange for a release from the mortgage obligation.
2
  Field service managers are companies that provide property preservation and protection services consisting of but
not limited to inspecting and securing properties, performing cosmetic enhancements or repairs, and providing
ongoing property maintenance.
3
  Asset managers are companies that are responsible for the marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties,
consisting of but not limited to monitoring the condition of the properties to ensure that they are maintained in
ready-to-show condition until sold.


                                                            3
To implement its asset manager contract with HUD, Alpine contracts with local listing brokers to
perform property marketing and sale services and property inspections. Regarding property
inspections, Alpine’s listing brokers perform (1) the initial inspections of HUD-acquired
properties to determine whether the properties are in ready-to-show condition, (2) walk-through
inspections to ensure that all initial services, work orders and repairs,4 if applicable, had been
completed to ensure that the properties are in ready-to-list condition before the properties are
listed for sale, and (3) routine property inspection services and identifies issues that need to be
addressed to maintain the properties in marketable (ready-to-show) condition.

Our audit objective was to determine whether Alpine complied with its contract with HUD and
its own requirements for the marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties in the State of Illinois.




4
 Field service managers are responsible for performing initial services, routine inspections, completing work orders,
and needed repairs. Due to the various locations of the properties, they would use subcontractors to perform the
services.


                                                          4
Results of Audit

Finding 1: Alpine Did Not Always Comply With Its Contract With
HUD and Its Own Requirements for the Marketing and Sale of
HUD-Owned Properties
Alpine did not always comply with its contract with HUD and its own requirements for the
marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties. Specifically, it did not ensure that properties were
in ready-to-show condition. The deficiencies occurred because Alpine did not provide adequate
oversight of its listing brokers to ensure that properties were maintained in accordance with its
contract with HUD and its own requirements. As a result, HUD lacked assurance that it received
the highest net return on the sale of the properties and that its holding costs for maintaining
properties in inventory were minimized.
Alpine Did Not Ensure That Properties Were Adequately Maintained
From Alpine’s inventory of properties, we observed 26 properties to determine whether Alpine
ensured that the properties were maintained in accordance with its contract with HUD and its
own requirements. Contrary to HUD’s requirements and Alpine’s marketing plan,5 11 of the 26
properties (42 percent) had 25 deficiencies. The 11 properties had interior or exterior health and
safety hazard deficiencies, other deficiencies, or a combination of deficiencies. Specifically,

          7 properties had 11 interior health and safety hazards,
          4 properties had 4 exterior heal and safety hazards,
          7 properties had 7 other interior deficiencies, and
          3 properties had 3 other exterior deficiencies.
Seven Properties Had Eleven Interior Health and Safety Hazards
Seven properties were not free of interior health and safety hazards. The following items are
examples of interior health and safety hazards observed: uncapped and exposed electrical wires,
missing or damaged outlet covers, torn or damaged floor; defective threshold, broken windows,
and protruding nails.
Four Properties Had Four Exterior Health and Safety Hazards
Contrary to section C.2.2 of Alpine’s contract, four properties were not free of exterior health
and safety hazards. The following items are an example of exterior health and safety hazards
observed: unsecured detached garage door and unsecured roof board.
Seven Properties Had Seven Other Interior Deficiencies
Contrary to section C.2.2 of Alpine’s contract, seven properties were not in ready-to-show
condition due to interior deficiencies. The following items are examples of other interior


5
    See appendix B for criteria.


                                                     5
deficiencies observed: writings on the wall, dirty refrigerator with molded food, bad odor, debris
in basement, and dirty sink with mold like substance.
Three Properties Had Three Other Exterior Deficiencies
Contrary to section C.2.2 of Alpine’s contract, the exterior of three properties was not in ready-
to-show condition. The following items are examples of other exterior deficiencies observed:
excessive leaves in the yard, garbage around the exterior of the property, and debris in the front
yard.

The following photographs illustrate examples of the deficiencies noted during the property
observations of the 11 properties that were not maintained in accordance with Alpine’s contract
with HUD or its own requirements.


Property # OIG25:
Broken outlet




                                                 6
Property # OIG49:
Unsecured garage
door




 Property # OIG49:
 Broken window




                     7
Property # OIG18:
Tripping hazard




  Property # OIG18:
  Dirty refrigerator
  with food (mold)




                       8
Property # OIG28:
Unsecured roof
board




Property # OIG43:
Debris in basement




                     9
Property # OIG30:
Broken threshold




Property # OIG6:
Dirty vent




                    10
    Property # OIG7:
    Uncapped wires




The 11 properties had an inspection by Alpine’s listing brokers before our observations;
however, HUD’s P260 system6 did not contain documentation showing that the listing brokers
had identified the same deficiencies. In addition, HUD’s P260 system did not contain work
orders showing that work had been requested or completed to mitigate the identified deficiencies
during the listing brokers’ later inspections. The property management ready-to-show condition
checklist requires that assigned properties be maintained in ready-to-show condition at all times.
In addition, Alpine’s listing brokers were required to report to Alpine when their inspections
determined that a property was not in ready-to-show condition.

As a result of our audit, in March 2017, Alpine issued work order notifications to correct the
deficiencies that we had identified for 8 of the 11 properties. The remaining three properties had
been sold. As of June 7, 2017, Alpine provided documentation to support that the deficiencies
had been mitigated for the eight properties.

Alpine Did Not Adequately Oversee Its Listing Brokers
The weakness described above occurred because Alpine did not adequately oversee its listing
brokers to ensure that properties were maintained in accordance with its contract with HUD and
its own requirements. Alpine conducted desk reviews of the listing brokers’ inspection reports,
and other supporting documentation. However, the inspection reports and supporting

6
 P260 is an internet-based system that serves as the primary system of record for all HUD real estate-owned case
management transactions. The system assigns each property for contractors to track the disposition activity from
conveyance to sale.




                                                         11
documentation were not always accurate. For example, for one property (FHA case number 137-
533890), a subcontractor for HUD’s field service manager inspected the property on January 21,
2017. The photographs to support the inspection showed that the subcontractor removed a
disconnected broken toilet from the basement. However, Alpine’s inspection report dated
January 22, 2017, contained a photograph of the toilet in the basement. According to Alpine’s
senior vice president, its listing broker’s field inspector performed a routine inspection on
January 15, 2017, but used January 22, 2017, as the date of the inspection. When the listing
broker’s field inspector reinspected the property on February 5, 2017, he inappropriately changed
the date for the inspection from January 22 to January 19, 2017.

Further, Alpine’s quality control plan did not specify whether or when it would conduct onsite
quality control inspections to ensure that its listing brokers were complying with the terms of
their agreements and to validate the inspection reports and other documents prepared by its
listing brokers. According to Alpine’s senior vice president, Alpine had not performed onsite
quality control property inspections since October 2016. However, it had notified its listing
brokers of the deficiencies identified during the October onsite inspections and the deficiencies
had been corrected. Alpine did not maintain sufficient documentation to support that the onsite
quality control inspections had occurred and that corrective actions had been taken.

HUD’s qualitative monitoring reviews for the months of July through September 2016 showed
that properties assigned to Alpine were generally not maintained in ready-to-show condition.
According to HUD’s Atlanta Homeownership Center’s director of Real Estate-Owned division,
although the field service manager was responsible for the maintenance of the properties, Alpine
was responsible for reporting whether the properties were continuously maintained in ready-to-
show condition.

As a result of our audit, Alpine has performed onsite quality control inspection for 33 properties
in April 2017. Its inspections identified similar deficiencies that we had identified during our
property observations. According to Alpine’s senior vice president, Alpine plans to amend its
quality control plan to include field inspections for 5 percent of its inventory every 6 months.

Conclusion
Alpine lacked oversight of its listing brokers to ensure that properties were maintained in
accordance with HUD’s and its own requirements. As a result, HUD lacked assurance that it
received the highest net return on the sale of the properties and that its holding costs for
maintaining properties in inventory were minimized.
Recommendations
We recommend that HUD’s Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family Housing require
Alpine to

       1A.     Implement adequate procedures and controls to ensure that it properly monitors
               the listing brokers to ensure compliance with its contract. The procedures and
               controls should include but not limited to performing quality control reviews and




                                                 12
      supervisory review of its brokers, and maintaining documentation of its quality
      control reviews and corrective actions.

1B.   Update its quality control plan to include the performance of physical inspections
      of the properties in its inventory.




                                       13
Scope and Methodology
We performed our audit work between November 2016 and January 2017 at Alpine’s office
located on 1321 Murfreesboro Pike, Suite 202, Nashville, TN, and the Chicago regional office.
In addition, we performed our property observations in IL. The audit covered the period
February 1, 2016 through October 31, 2016, Alpine’s active inventory in HUD’s P260 system,
and was expanded as necessary.

To accomplish our review objective, we interviewed HUD’s staff from the Atlanta
Homeownership Center and Alpine’s employees. In addition, we obtained and reviewed the
following:

        HUD’s contract with Alpine; Alpine’s marketing and quality control plans; quality
         control reviews; and internal policies and procedures; and
        Information contained in HUD’s P260 system, including the active properties assigned
         Alpine inventory, routine, initial, and prior-to-list inspection reports and photographs.

During the review, we selected two separate samples totaling 27 (16 + 11) properties. Rather
than selecting a 100 percent sample selection or representative selection, we identified a
relatively small items of interest to support our conclusion because we had enough knowledge
about the universe. 7 For the first sample, we selected 16 of the 52 properties located in the
Chicago area that were not under a sales contract as of January 5, 2017, to determine whether the
properties were maintained in ready-to-show condition. For the second sample, we selected 11
of the 15 properties located in the Chicagoland metropolitan area that had recently undergone
either an initial or prior-to-list inspection to determine whether the properties were in ready-to-
show condition before the properties were listed for sale. We observed 26 of the 278 properties
in January 2017. The results of the sample property observation were limited to the population
reviewed and cannot be projected to the universe.

We relied in part on data maintained by Alpine and data maintained in HUD’s P260 system.
Although we did not perform a detailed assessment of the reliability of the data, we performed a
minimal level of testing and found the data to be adequately reliable for our purposes.




7
  During our recently completed audit of P.K. Management Group, Incorporated (PKMG), the HUD contracted field
service manager for the State of IL, audit report 2016-CH-1008, we observed over 100 properties throughout the
State of IL. Based on the results of the audit, we determined that a small sample would be sufficient for this review
due to our knowledge of the conditions of the HUD-owned properties in IL. Therefore, we limited our observations
to properties located within either Chicago or the Chicagoland area.
8
  We were not able to gain access into one of the selected property to observe its condition (FHA property number
137-472799.


                                                          14
We provided our review results to HUD’s Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family
Housing; director of the Atlanta Home Ownership Center, Real Estate Owned Division; and
Alpine’s president.

We conducted the audit in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards.
Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate
evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit
objective(s). We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our finding
and conclusion based on our audit objective.




                                                15
Internal Controls
Internal control is a process adopted by those charged with governance and management,
designed to provide reasonable assurance about the achievement of the organization’s mission,
goals, and objectives with regard to

   effectiveness and efficiency of operations,
   reliability of financial reporting, and
   compliance with applicable laws and regulations.
Internal controls comprise the plans, policies, methods, and procedures used to meet the
organization’s mission, goals, and objectives. Internal controls include the processes and
procedures for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling program operations as well as the
systems for measuring, reporting, and monitoring program performance.
Relevant Internal Controls
We determined that the following internal controls were relevant to our audit objective:

   Effectiveness and efficiency of operations – Policies and procedures that management has
    implemented to reasonably ensure that a program meets its objectives.
   Compliance with applicable laws and regulations – Policies and procedures that management
    has implemented to reasonably ensure that resource use is consistent with laws and
    regulations.
We assessed the relevant controls identified above.
A deficiency in internal control exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow
management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, the
reasonable opportunity to prevent, detect, or correct (1) impairments to effectiveness or
efficiency of operations, (2) misstatements in financial or performance information, or (3)
violations of laws and regulations on a timely basis.
Significant Deficiency
Based on our review, we believe that the following item is a significant deficiency:

   Alpine lacked adequate oversight of its listing brokers to ensure that properties were
    maintained in accordance with its contract with HUD and its own requirements (finding).




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Appendixes

Appendix A
             Auditee Comments and OIG’s Evaluation


Ref to OIG
Evaluation




Comment 1


Comment 2



Comment 3

Comment 4




Comment 2




                               17
             Auditee Comments and OIG’s Evaluation




Ref to OIG    Auditee Comments
Evaluation


Comment 5




                               18
Ref to OIG   Auditee Comments
Evaluation




Comment 6

Comment 6




Comment 7




                            19
                         OIG Evaluation of Auditee Comments


Comment 1   We commend Alpine for the corrective actions it has taken to address the
            noncompliance with its contract with HUD and its own requirements for the
            marketing and sale of HUD-owned properties. It should work closely with HUD
            to ensure that it has adequately improved its quality control procedures and that
            those procedures are fully implemented.

Comment 2   Alpine stated that the field service manager or the government technical
            representative ensures that the property condition has been resolved after they
            have been notified via work order notifications from Alpine. In addition, the field
            service manager was responsible for the maintenance and management of a
            property. However, according to HUD’s contract with Alpine, Alpine was
            required to use the work order system to make requests for work items, and verify
            the accuracy and validity of all work orders and the corrective actions taken to
            ensure that the properties were being maintained in accordance with its contract.
            Further, according to HUD’s Atlanta Homeownership Center’s director of Real
            Estate-Owned division, although the field service manager was responsible for the
            maintenance of the properties, Alpine was responsible for reporting whether the
            properties were continuously maintained in ready-to-show condition.

Comment 3   Alpine stated that it was diligent in training its vendors on contractual
            requirements. In addition, it stated that it provided ongoing oversight of the
            listing brokers and their performance was reviewed and rated on a quarterly basis.
            We acknowledge that Alpine provided guidance to the listing brokers via regular
            conference calls. However, as discussed in the report, its quality control plan did
            not specify whether or when it would conduct onsite quality control inspections to
            ensure that the listing brokers were complying with the terms of their agreements
            and to validate the inspection reports and other documents prepared by its listing
            brokers.

Comment 4   We acknowledge the steps Alpine has taken to address the cited deficiencies.
            Further, we acknowledge that the property condition deficiencies for FHA case
            number 137-362908 were corrected after our inspection on January 11, 2017, and
            before our results briefing on February 28, 2017. On May 31, 2017, Alpine
            provided documentation to support that the deficiencies had been mitigated for
            FHA case number 137-362908, which we already considered before the issuance
            of the discussion draft audit report.

Comment 5   We previously reviewed and considered the contents of the table before we issued
            the discussion draft audit report to Alpine for comment. Therefore, no revisions
            to the audit report were warranted.




                                             20
Comment 6   Alpine’s revised quality control requirements and its commitment to conduct
            inspections of a minimum of five percent of the properties in its inventory every 6
            months, if fully implemented, should improve its oversight of the listing brokers’
            to ensure that Alpine complies with its contract with HUD. However, Alpine
            should work closely with HUD, including during the audit resolution process, to
            ensure that it has adequately improved its quality control procedures and that
            those procedures are fully implemented.

Comment 7   We acknowledge Alpine’s attached quality control plan amendment. Alpine
            should work closely with HUD to ensure that it has adequately improved its
            quality control procedures and that those procedures are fully implemented.
            However, the quality control plan amendment was excluded from the audit report
            because it was not necessary for understanding Alpine’s comments.




                                             21
Appendix B
                                              Criteria

Section 2.2 of HUD’s contract with Alpine states that (1) a property is in ready-to-show
condition when it meets all the following requirements and must remain in ready-to-show
condition until the property is sold HUD is no longer responsible for its maintenance. Dwellings
and structures must be free of debris; and health and safety hazards. The property must be free
of broken windows; exposed nails and hooks must be removed; exposed electrical wires must be
capped; and any broken or missing outlet and switch covers in easily accessible areas must be
covered. All appliances and plumbing fixtures must be clean and the house must be free of bad
odors; floors must be cleaned and carpets vacuumed; graffiti must be covered in a professional
manner; and the yard must be free of trash, debris, and accumulated leaves. The properties must
be secured meaning all windows, doors and openings must be locked, boarded, or otherwise
secured to prevent unauthorized entry by person or animal into any portion of the dwelling,
including exterior entrances to crawl spaces, and any other structures on the property, for
instance, garages and sheds. The properties must be free of health and safety hazards or any
conditions or situations at a property that exposes the government to abnormal risk; that presents
a source of danger, which could cause an accident, or poses the threat of injury, harm to the
public and the hazard must be corrected within one day of discovery or notification. All repairs
required to correct safety hazards and any approved repairs to be done before listing the property
for sale must be completed in order for the house to be in ready-to-show condition.

Section 5.1.8.1 of HUD’s contract with Alpine states that the contractor must develop, maintain,
and implement a comprehensive quality control plan. The plan must ensure that all aspects of
the performance work schedule are performed completely and appropriately, and must contain a
plan for corrective action when deficiencies or insufficient performance are identified by either
HUD or the contractor. The quality control plan must include a detailed inspection oversight
program covering all general and specific tasks and specify tasks or areas to be inspected on
either a scheduled or unscheduled basis including the manner in which inspection is to be
conducted.

Section 5.2.1.1 of HUD’s contract with Alpine states that that not later than two business days
from assignment to an asset manager, the contractor must ensure that the listing broker performs
an initial inspection using the asset manager’s property inspection report to ascertain whether the
property is in ready-to-show condition. Further, no sooner than two business days before the
initial listing of the property for sale, the contractor should ensure that the listing broker performs
a walk through inspection to ensure that all initial services, work orders and repairs, if applicable,
had been completed as intended and ensure that the property is in ready-to-list condition.

Section 5.2.1.11 of HUD’s contract with Alpine states that the contractor must ensure listing
brokers perform required inspections, ensure listing brokers provide other customary services
(i.e. property inspections every 2 weeks, monitor and document activity at property, and
coordinate with the asset manager, field service manager, selling broker and buyer’s closing




                                                   22
agent). The contractor’s marketing and quality control plans should address how the contractor
intends to accomplish these requirements.

Alpine’s marketing plan states that the listing brokers are tasked with providing initial and
ongoing (routine) inspections and identifying any property issues that need to be addressed to
maintain the asset in marketable (ready-to-show) condition.

Property management ready-to-show condition checklist states that (1) minor surface mold and
mildew throughout the interior of the property will be cleaned with a disinfectant or a bleach
solution, especially around tub/shower areas and sinks, and (2) trip hazards should be mitigated
throughout the property. Further, the listing brokers are required to report to Alpine when their
inspections determined that properties were not being maintained in ready-to-show condition.

Alpine’s master listing broker service agreement states that the listing broker will inspect all
properties every two weeks until closing. Inspection reports on the approved form and photo
documentation must be uploaded into the P260 system with proper photo documentation within
24 hours of inspection.




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